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What kind of pepper is this?

Will they last a while? Can they be frozen? Stored?

Good recipes?

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LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


Garnerville, NY
image.jpg 1.9M
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Comments

  • BotchBotch Posts: 3,198
    edited August 2013
    According to the Great American Chile Pepper, Fresco poster hanging in my kitchen, you have yourself what's called a "Peter Pepper".  All the brief write-up says is "A rare Ornamental, southern Louisiana and Texas".  
    Sorry I can't be more help... 
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    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
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  • BotchBotch Posts: 3,198
    I had to look the thing up on Wikipedia, and got quite a chuckle reading about it.  This is a family forum so I'll just post the link:  Peter Pepper
     

    ;))
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
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  • JRWhiteeJRWhitee Posts: 2,619
    Botch said:
    I had to look the thing up on Wikipedia, and got quite a chuckle reading about it.  This is a family forum so I'll just post the link:  Peter Pepper
     

    ;))

    :((
                                                                        
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    Large BGE 2006, Mini Max 2014 
    Founding Member of the Green Man Group cooking team.
    Johns Creek, Georgia




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  • Hungry JoeHungry Joe Posts: 1,161
    edited August 2013
    That looks like what we call "Long hots" or "Long Italian hots" in Jersey.
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  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,280
    That looks like what we call "Long hots" or "Long Italian hots" in Jersey.
    thats what it look liked to me.  I had a plant go crazy and I dried a bunch and made some great crushed red peppers with them.  
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  • jaydub58jaydub58 Posts: 1,615

    Look like just nice, healthy cayenne to me.  The crook in the body and fairly sharp tip make me think that.  I grow a couple of plants of them every year. 

    No need to freeze them.  When they are nice and red, just pick them and use a needle and thread to string them together to dry out.  When they are nice and dry you can store them in a closed glass container for at least year.  I've stored them longer than that on occasion. 

    You  can cook with them whole or tear them into pieces.  I like to grind them up with a coffee bean grinder to sprinkle into food (don't use the same one your wife uses for home coffee!).

    A real nice hot pepper that is easy to work with and sure spices up your egging.

    PS, DON'T forget to wash your hands every time you do anything with them!

    John in the Willamette Valley of Oregon
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  • I'm from Jersey and those look just like the ones we grow, easy to care for in this climate.  Med-Hot, I like em. We smoke them, dry them, grind them, make sauce out of them.  Versatile.  
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  • BotchBotch Posts: 3,198
    jaydub58 said:

    The crook in the body and fairly sharp tip make me think that. 

     
    I completely missed the sharp tip, thanks for the observation; not a peter pepper...
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
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  • HibbyHibby Posts: 454
    edited August 2013
    I can do you one better than that. We were plagued by a batch of mulch that came with some phallus impudicus fungi. Very tough to get rid of (ended up having to strip and burn all mulch). Horrible stinky stuff and frequently grew multiple inches in one day. Nice pepper you've got there.
    Conservative stalwart in Thornville, Ohio
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  • Back to the question, lol, yes, you can string them like popcorn and hang them to dry and the will keep for some time, otherwise I cut and deseed them, freeze, and just make sure you use them frozen, don't thaw first.
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  • DawnlDawnl Posts: 210
    Grew those last year, call them cow's horn.  Some are hot and some mild, interesting pepper.  Dried them for grinding.
    Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 17,112
    betting its a "hot portugal" pepper, they sell the plants up north because they have a shorter gow season than alot of other peppers
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  • robnybbqrobnybbq Posts: 1,783
    Cool - Will pick them this week and dry them out.

    Thanks

    What about Hungarian Hot peppers - Can those be dried or use them now?

    _______________________________________________________________
    LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


    Garnerville, NY
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