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Knife question (cutco)

So I am in the market for a good butchers knife. I am using the same cheap target block set that had like 10 knives for $50 from target I got when I was 20 and rented first place. 
The goal is buy a butchers knife, then a pairing knife. A buddy has Cutco knives and i was using his butcher knife last night. I really liked it. Sharp, good feel. But I have a few questions 1) how good are they actually? seem to have a good warranty 2) bc cant really buy direct it seems kind of scammish. but also dont buy direct from BGE so... 3) should i buy something else instead? i prefer to send my knife off once a year to be sharpened by manufacture. i think cutco has that option. 

any of info you can offer would be helpful
Boom

Comments

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,008
    Feeling good in your hand is an important factor when considering a knife.

    Is the blade you are looking at straight, or their "double D" serrated. Personally, I don't like serrated for much of anything except hard crust bread. And, serrated would probably require shipping back to the factory. While I sharpen my own blades, I know of a couple local guys who will sharpen a butcher's knife for $6 - $8, and I can get it done while I wait.

    Cutco says their blades are now 440A, and heat treated. 440A is quite stain resistant, but I haven't read that even w. treatment it is particularly hard. If you get it, have a good honing steel on hand.

    You might also look at the Victorinox Fibrox line, or Dexter-Russell.

    Small question. Why a butcher knife? Most home meat cutting can be done w. a chef's or a boning knife.


  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,405
    thanks for response

    i meant chefs knife. i was talking to someone while typing that ha. chefs knife is the knife i am looking for. 
    Boom
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,405
    and i am open to other knives. not set on cutco. i want to spend $100-150 max on a chefs knife. i want one that can use for rest of life ha. 
    we have a local store in columbia called charleston cooks. they sell expensive stuff (so hoping good) and there is a williams-sonoma on other side of town. 
    Boom
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 7,156
    If you have a local knife store(or Williams Sonoma) go buy and play around with some to get the right feel. Also, what is your budget? Japanese and German steel can be found for reasonable prices. Lamson and Goodnow make good stuff up in Massachusetts as well. 

    +1 on the Victornox blades. There chef knife is top quality for around $30. 
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,405
    If you have a local knife store(or Williams Sonoma) go buy and play around with some to get the right feel. Also, what is your budget? Japanese and German steel can be found for reasonable prices. Lamson and Goodnow make good stuff up in Massachusetts as well. 

    +1 on the Victornox blades. There chef knife is top quality for around $30. 
    can go up to $150, like to stay around $100
    Boom
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 7,156
    Go strong on the chef knife and stay away from pricey secondary knives(like the pairing) Global, Wustof, Henkels and Lamson all fall in the range of $75-$150. You can also check out chefknivestogo.com and scroll through their forum to see people's thoughts on knives. Lots of options in that budget.
  • +1 on Victorinox Fribox.

    Just go on Amazon......you can buy a whole drawer full of them for what you're going to spend on Cutco, Wusthof, Henkels, etc.  I have a whole set of Wusthof knives, but Victorinox is what I grab for big knives.  Wustof makes great paring knives, but their chef's knife is way too bulky.

    Get two sizes of chef's knives, and their slicing knife with the granton edge.  Three knives for under $150.

    I also have a Kyocera ceramic knife for veggies and other non-fibrous foods.  I eventually buy a Japanese sushi knife as well, but I use don't want to buy special sharpener for it (because of the angle).  I use a Chef's Choice 130 right now......they make a special one for Japanese knives.

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  • RaymontRaymont Posts: 171

    I really like my shun chef's knife. Wish I had the whole set.

    Small & Large BGE

    Nashville, TN

  • Find something that feels good and is well made.  And don't feel like you have to pay $150 if the knife feels good.  I've went to kitchen supply stores locally and found quality chef's knives for $30 to $50 that were just as good as the designer knives you see at Bed Bath and Beyond.

    Ice 

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,008
    You can also check out chefknivestogo.com and scroll through their forum to see people's thoughts on knives. Lots of options in that budget.
    I have several knives from CKTG, and have been happy w. the service and the price. Definitely a fine place for comparison shopping, w. many knife types, both Western and Japanese. Their house brand, the Richmond Artifex line, is remarkably fine for the price, and is made to their specs by Lamson & Goodnow.

    There are lots of good knives in the $100 range that will certainly last for decades, probably longer. Just avoid major goofs, like tossing them into a sink or dishwasher, using them to pry apart meat joints, or cutting on granite or glass surfaces.
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 4,819
    You have the right mindset - your friend's knife impressed you because it felt right in your hand while using it. Like @Eggcelsior said, visit a place where you can try a knife out. Big difference in the long term satisfaction index.
    Think about what you will use your knives for. For me, 90% of knife use is meat is trimming and deboning (specially poultry), so a good boning knife (stiff fillet knife) works for me. I have a good 10" slicer, used for brisket and roasts. Like @gdenby said double D edge for crusty breads.
    For veggies, 6" and 8" Santoku Target cheapies - never had a carrot, eggplant or piece of celery that cared if it was chopped by a $5 knife or $100 knife. 
    There is no one answer, only the one you are happy with. 

    Delta B.C., Canuckistan - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • MrossMross Posts: 240
    We have Cutco knives and I hate every single one of them. I have found I only use a Chef Knife and a Boning knife. Any of the major names make good knives and you need to handle a few different ones before you buy.
    My motto is Buy once Cry once! Get the best knife you can afford.
    Duncan, SC
  • I have a small set of Cutco, and would not buy them again.  They are sharp when they come back from them, but lose the edge quickly.  I've had them for three years, sent them back twice and need to send them back again for a fresh edge.

    I know others that have them and love them and keep the edge, my experience has not been good.
  • StlScottStlScott Posts: 77
    +1 for Victorinox. Fantastic blade, cuts great, feels good in my hand and didn't break my wallet.

    StlScott
  • Just got a promo email from Kyocera......30% sale.  Use promo code "SUMMER" at checkout.

    http://kyoceraadvancedceramics.com/

    I have their 5.5" Santoku knife.  I've been meaning to order there peeler, slicer, and a few other things to try.

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  • BuckeggBuckegg Posts: 9
    My wife bought a set of Cutco from a friends son. I just about fainted when I saw the price. I think they are way too expensive for what you get. I have a Shun that I bought on Woot, It's great.
  • pkaboo1pkaboo1 Posts: 99

    I have a 8" Wusthof, 8"Shun, and a 8"Victorinox.

    I think I paid $26.00 for the Victorinox, and I use it most of the time,

    I like the handle.

    I  always use my honing steel.

    I

    Snellville,Ga.
  • onedbguruonedbguru Posts: 302
    edited August 2013
    I sold Cutco when I was 19.  That was 36+ years ago.  I still have the same set I used to demo with.  They have a lifetime warranty and I have sent the butcher knife back once a few years ago to be re-sharpened.  Cost... shipping.  I also sent back a metal spatula (turner) and one serving spoon due to broken handles. They replaced both of them at nc.  I will probably send a couple others back for sharpening including the big chefs knife. Again, that is once in 36+ years.  I also have a full 8-piece set of the steak knives. To demo these, I used 1/2 shoe leather. If it can cut that, it can cut any steak.  With the bread slicer (serrated) I could slice a piece of Wonder Bread into 5 very thin slices - without tearing it. Try that with any other knife.  

    There were 2 carving sets (knife + carving fork), bread slicer, butcher knife (hacks a chicken in half with ease), large chefs, 2 serving spoons (one slotted), a ladle and a whisk, a boning knife, paring knife and a small spatula with one serrated cutting edge (great for slicing a tomato and putting mayo on bread for a great BLT). 
     
    I would give them 2 thumbs up.
  • *full disclosure*

    They are made and marketed to home makers, not serious cooks.  The serrated blade, the handle, the lack of bolsters, etc.  I could go on but this guy went on a MUCH longer rant (albeit very well thought out) about why they aren't worth a damn.


    Get a real knife or small battery and a steel get them professionally sharpened from time to time.  I bring my knives two or three times to NW Cutlery in Chicago where they do any size blade for three bucks.  They come out like scapels though.

    As others have suggested, I would reccomend the Victorinox.  They're great knifes, affordable and I actually prefer them over the heavier knives because they're thinner and lighter and sharpen a little easier.  I've found their 10" chef knife is a little "taller' than a lot of other brands which gives a guy with a big hand a little more room and anyone more sharpening life. They make them with wood handles or plastic. 

    12"

    8" (I really like this one)

    for your butchering :)

    great little knife



    "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
     Brillat-Savarin
  • RRPRRP Posts: 12,046
    edited August 2013
    We have a like new set of 5 Cutco knifes that we bought from a neighbor boy his freshman year in college about 25 years ago. I sort of knew the story and knew they were overpriced, but I also knew he needed the money for school. I recall that set was like $300, but the lifetime warranty plus the obvious quality was apparent. Only problem then as well as now is my wife has a phobia from too many horror shows about sharp knifes. ours came with a slick protective storage tray around which I designed and built into a hidden portion of a low level kitchen shelf. Unless you know how to find it and open it no one will ever accidentally discover it! No demented person will wander in to our kitchen and find these 5 lethal weapons! LOL Now fast forward to the present...after all these years I have used these and carefully cleaned them and still love them, but my work horse chef knifes and others are my everyday knifes...and they too are out of sight for killers to grab, but not as hidden as our pearl handled Cutco set. PS... to this very day I remember my response that night to the steak knife demo whereby the Manila rope was sliced...I said "if I can afford these knifes then I probably can afford to buy quality steaks that aren't that tough!"

  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,405
    RRP said:
    I said "if I can afford these knifes then I probably can afford to buy quality steaks that aren't that tough!"
    HAHAHAHAHA that is funny
    Boom
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 847
    I have had a Cutco set for 15+ years and am pleased with them. Like any knife, you need to sharpen occasionally. No biggie. I have never sharpened the serrated knives, and they still cut well. I also have inexpensive Kuhn-Rikon knives that I take on vacations, etc. Scary sharp when new, but easy to maintain.
    XLBGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • I like my Wusthof Classic 7" hollow-ground santoku and my Global 7" nakiri for most work.  When I'm breaking down a sub-primal, though, I use a long, thin Wusthof utility knife to trim and then this guy to cut the steaks:

    image
    Also, I have a knife problem and spend too much money on knives.  I admit and am okay with my problem.

    [Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.
  • I have a bunch of Cutco knives that I have received as gifts over the years. I really like them, but they do dull very quickly. Fortunately, I have access to a decent sharpener so I keep them like razor blades. At some point I will buy nicer knives, but for now I'm plenty happy with the Cutco.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,008

    Also, I have a knife problem and spend too much money on knives.  I admit and am okay with my problem.
    Welcome to the club. Altho sometimes I feel silly slicing liver sausage w. a $200 knife.
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