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Pork Chop Brine

Anyone have a fantastic brine for thick cut chops, would appreciate any assistance!
LBGE 2013 Located in Savannah, Georgia

Comments

  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 11,107
    edited August 2013
    water, salt, sugar. I'm doing it right now

    You can add herbs if you like but they make for an expensive brine and the flavor is pretty subtle. You could add a little lemon, bay leaf, cracked pepper and any herbs you like. I've done it all and have settled on 1 cup salt, 1/2 cup sugar, I gallon water.

    Here is a fancy brine for you if you want to go down the route:

    Herb Brine:

    1 Gallon (4 liters) Water
    1 Cup (225 Grams)  Kosher Salt
    1/2 Cup (125 grams) Sugar
    (this is all you need but I add the following on their advice in the book):

    1 bunch of fresh Tarragon
    1 bunch of Fresh Parsley
    2 bay leaves
    1 head of Garlic- Halved Horizontally
    1 Onion- sliced
    3tbsp/30 grams black pepper- lightly crushed
    2 lemons- Halved (give a good squeeze as you toss then in)

    Should be noted that any aromatic can be thrown in - Celery, Carrot, garlic, any herbs (stems are fine) are all good and the more the merrier.

    combine all brine ingredients into a pot and bring to a boil. Stir to dissolve all salts and sugars. Remove from heat and allow to cool to room temp. then put in fridge until chilled.

    Add bird to the brine and weight it down with a plate or something that will keep the whole thing completely submerged for the appropriate brine time (see below).

    Remove from brine, pat dry and let rest uncovered in the fridge for 2-24 hours. This is important as it forms the "pellicle" (tacky surface) that binds to the smoke flavor)

    Brine Times:

    Boneless Chicken Breast (8oz/225 grams): 2 hrs
    2lb chicken (1 Kilo) 4-6 hours
    3-4lb chicken (1.5-2 kilos) 8-12 hours
    Boneless Turkey Breast (4 inches/10cm thick) 12-18 hours
    10-15lb Turkey (4-7 Kilo) 24 hours
    Turkey over 15lb/7 kilos: 24-36 hours




  • AquacopAquacop Posts: 457
    I am humbled from by graced by the famous The Cen-Tex Smoker, thanks very much for your input/advice, I value this forums knowledge greatly. Plus you guys are Bat-Shit crazy and thats right up my alley!

    Cheers, Mark
    LBGE 2013 Located in Savannah, Georgia
  • I just use about a quarter of the water to bring to a boil and dissolve the solids and then add rest of water after taking off heat. Shortens the time you have to wait for it to cool.
  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,116
    Add ice as part of the water and that reduces cooling even more. Put the brine in the frig, and get the temp down to 40 degrees before you add the protein.
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 14,035
    Best thick pork chops (rib chops) Simple brine, 1/2 c kosher salt, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2-3 cups water...brine the chops a few hours (zip lock gallon bag is perfect). Pat dry, coffee rub and cook 'em hot and fast. preferred internal here would be to pull at 130-135* tops...carryover during the rest will bring them to 140-145* +/-. Keep it simple! Just don't cook 'em to death!!
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • NibbleMeThisNibbleMeThis Posts: 2,237
    I like to add a little apple juice for my pork chop and pork tenderloin brine.

    4 cups water
    30 grams salt by weight (about 2-3 Tbsp of Kosher salt)
    1.5 Tbsp brown sugar
    1.5 Tbsp agave nectar or good local honey
    1 tsp minced garlic
    12 black peppercorns
    1 bay leaf
    3 cups ice
    2 cups apple juice

    Heat the 4 cups of water and stir in salt, sugar, agave, garlic, peppercorns and bay leaf.  Stir until dissolved.  Remove from heat and add cold apple juice and ice to cool to 40f or below.  Use to brine pork chops 4-6 hours.  If needing a shorter soak time, I increase the salt to 5 Tbsp and reduce brine time to 2 hours. 
  • AquacopAquacop Posts: 457
    Mickey said:
    Best thick pork chops (rib chops) Simple brine, 1/2 c kosher salt, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2-3 cups water...brine the chops a few hours (zip lock gallon bag is perfect). Pat dry, coffee rub and cook 'em hot and fast. preferred internal here would be to pull at 130-135* tops...carryover during the rest will bring them to 140-145* +/-. Keep it simple! Just don't cook 'em to death!!
    What temp do you cook them at Mickey?
    LBGE 2013 Located in Savannah, Georgia
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,590
    Mickey does everything raised direct at 400º - works very well. I like chops and steaks reverse seared, so indirect at 250 until IT clears 125º - then high heat finish for colour and taste. 
    Brine is the answer - learned that here. As CT says, the herbs are very subtle, I've raided the spice cabinet and used up some of the dried Tarragon we received as a wedding present - after 42 years it is not like fine wine, but it felt better than throwing it out. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 10,895
    Aquacop said:

    I am humbled from by graced by the famous The Cen-Tex Smoker, thanks very much for your input/advice, I value this forums knowledge greatly. Plus you guys are Bat-Shit crazy and thats right up my alley!


    Cheers, Mark
    I'm gonna puke... This guy almost burnt his house down and you're taking advice from him? =))

    Jk... I contact him weekly
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 11,107
    edited August 2013
    henapple said:
    I am humbled from by graced by the famous The Cen-Tex Smoker, thanks very much for your input/advice, I value this forums knowledge greatly. Plus you guys are Bat- @#!*% crazy and thats right up my alley!

    Cheers, Mark
    I'm gonna puke... This guy almost burnt his house down and you're taking advice from him? =)) Jk... I contact him weekly
    and the joke is on you. I've ruined more food than most people have cooked and I make all this sh*t up as I go. Good luck.



  • AquacopAquacop Posts: 457
    henapple said:
    I am humbled from by graced by the famous The Cen-Tex Smoker, thanks very much for your input/advice, I value this forums knowledge greatly. Plus you guys are Bat- @#!*% crazy and thats right up my alley!

    Cheers, Mark
    I'm gonna puke... This guy almost burnt his house down and you're taking advice from him? =)) Jk... I contact him weekly
    and the joke is on you. I've ruined more food than most people have cooked and I make all this sh*t up as I go. Good luck.


    You guys are Hilarious, one day I would love to but you a cold beer or 12
    LBGE 2013 Located in Savannah, Georgia
  • AquacopAquacop Posts: 457
    Mickey does everything raised direct at 400º - works very well. I like chops and steaks reverse seared, so indirect at 250 until IT clears 125º - then high heat finish for colour and taste. 
    Brine is the answer - learned that here. As CT says, the herbs are very subtle, I've raided the spice cabinet and used up some of the dried Tarragon we received as a wedding present - after 42 years it is not like fine wine, but it felt better than throwing it out. 
    Thanks
    LBGE 2013 Located in Savannah, Georgia
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 1,255
    I'm tying an Alton Brown 2 hour mustard brine. My first brine of anything. So, my question is, after I pull the chops and rinse them off in cold water, do I season before throwing them on the egg or is the brine all the seasoning they need? Thanks.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 5,291
    Brined the pork chops I did this weekend. I threw some Old Bay in the brine in place of half of the salt. Came out pretty good, but there's something to be said about keeping it simple with just salt, sugar, water. I lifted the brine recipe from someone who lifted it from Cen-Tex.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 1,255
    edited October 2013
    Here is the brine I'm trying. http://www.food.com/recipe/alton-browns-2-hour-mustard-brine-for-pork-chops-or-roast-191816 After researching other brines this one appears to have more salt per liquid. I added some water to make sure all my chops were covered.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 1,255
    Success. A tad on the salty side but the moisture and texture was great. I'll keep it at it. Probably just stick with water, apple cider vinegar, brown sugar, and salt. Just need to find the right ratios.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/
  • Mickey said:
    Best thick pork chops (rib chops) Simple brine, 1/2 c kosher salt, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2-3 cups water...brine the chops a few hours (zip lock gallon bag is perfect). Pat dry, coffee rub and cook 'em hot and fast. preferred internal here would be to pull at 130-135* tops...carryover during the rest will bring them to 140-145* +/-. Keep it simple! Just don't cook 'em to death!!
    Amen - 145 IT then wrap in tinfoil
  • ratcheerratcheer Posts: 189
    I just do a plain brine of 1 cup water, 1 T Kosher salt, and 1 T sugar. I usually only do 2 or 3 chops at a time. After an hour or so in the brine, I dry the chops and dry rub them with whatever seasonings.

    I have tried seasoned brines, but I could never really tell any difference in the flavor, so I stopped fussing with it.

    Tim
  • A little different take but my favorite way for years.

    Method: Direct Grilling

    Advance Preparation: 1-3 days for curing the pork

    Ingredients:
    1/2 cup sugar
    1 tbsp coarse salt (kosher or sea)
    1 tbsp sweet paprika
    2 tsp ground black pepper
    6 cloves garlic, minced
    4 boneless pork chops (each 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick and 6-7 oz) or 1 1/2
    lbs pork loin (2-3 tenderloins)
    2 tbsp vegetable oil
    Rice, for serving (optional)

    1. Place sugar, salt, paprika, pepper and garlic in a small mixing
    bowl and stir to mix.
    2. If using pork loin, cut it crosswise into 1/2 inch thick slices.
    Place the pork in a baking dish and sprinkle the rub all over both
    sides, patting it onto the meat with your fingertips. Let the meat
    cure in the refrigerator, covered, for at least 24 hours or as long as
    3 days (the longer the stronger). You can also cure the spice-rubbed
    pork in a resealable bag.
    3. Set up the grill for direct grilling and preheat to high.
    4. When ready to grill, brush and oil the grill grate. Using a
    rubber spatula, scrape most of the rub off the pork. Lightly brush
    the chops on both sides with the oil. Place the chops on the hot
    grill until browned on the outside and cooked through, 2-3 minutes per
    side. To test for doneness, use the poke method; the meat should be
    firm but gently yielding.
    5. Transfer the grilled pork to a platter or plates, let it rest for
    2 minutes. Rice makes a good accompaniment.

    Yield: Serves 4
    XL BGE 
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 14,035
    Aquacop said:
    henapple said:
    I am humbled from by graced by the famous The Cen-Tex Smoker, thanks very much for your input/advice, I value this forums knowledge greatly. Plus you guys are Bat- @#!*% crazy and thats right up my alley!

    Cheers, Mark
    I'm gonna puke... This guy almost burnt his house down and you're taking advice from him? =)) Jk... I contact him weekly
    and the joke is on you. I've ruined more food than most people have cooked and I make all this sh*t up as I go. Good luck.


    You guys are Hilarious, one day I would love to but you a cold beer or 12
    Just show up in Salado Texas on  March 14 & 15th.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • 500500 Posts: 1,198
    Large BGE; Midlothian, Virginia
    I like Pig Butts and I can not lie.
    "Barbecue is a journey, one meal at a time."
  • HDumptyEsqHDumptyEsq Posts: 1,095
    Sage - add lots of sage.

    Tony in Brentwood, TN.

    Medium BGE, New Braunfels off-set smoker, 3-burner Charbroiler gasser, mainly used for Eggcessory  storage, old electric upright now used for Amaz-N-Smoker.

    "I like cooking with wine - sometimes I put it in the food." - W. C. Fields

  • jscarfojscarfo Posts: 317
    Should you bring brine to a boil? Or just mix it together
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,159
    henapple said:
    I am humbled from by graced by the famous The Cen-Tex Smoker, thanks very much for your input/advice, I value this forums knowledge greatly. Plus you guys are Bat- @#!*% crazy and thats right up my alley!

    Cheers, Mark
    I'm gonna puke... This guy almost burnt his house down and you're taking advice from him? =)) Jk... I contact him weekly
    and the joke is on you. I've ruined more food than most people have cooked and I make all this sh*t up as I go. Good luck.


    I always thought you were blowing smoke when you said you were kind of a big deal around here. Guess not

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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