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homemade mozzarella for your pizza

RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
edited August 2013 in EggHead Forum

image   


30 Minute Mozzarella

 

This is a summary of a recipe from a library book entitled Recipes For All Types Of Cheese

 

Ingredients needed:

 

1 gallon whole milk that has not been ultra-pasteurized

¼ teaspoon  liquid rennet (or ¼ rennet tablet) diluted in ¼ cup cool, unchlorinated water

1 teaspoon cheese salt (optional) BTW un-idolized Kosher salt is a fine substitute.

2 level teaspoons citric acid (powder)

 

Method:

 

1. Add citric acid to milk and mix thoroughly

 

2. heat the milk to 88° - I used my Thermapen

 

3. gently stir in the diluted rennet using an up and down motion and continue heating to 105°. Turn off heat and let curd set for a few minutes – I let it go for 4 minutes

 

4. The curds should look like thick yogurt. If the whey is still milky white instead of yellowish wait a few more minutes.

 

5. scoop out the curds with a slotted spoon into a 2 quart microwaveable bowl. Press the curds gently with your hands pouring off as much whey as possible. Reserve the whey.

 

6. microwave the curds for 1 minute on high. Drain off the whey and quickly work the hot cheese into a ball with a spoon or your hands using rubber gloves for protection.

 

7. microwave two more times for 35 seconds each time draining off the whey and working the cheese.

 

8.  knead the cheese quickly like bread dough until it is smooth. Sprinkle on the salt if desired while kneading and stretching. When the cheese stretches like taffy it is done, but if the curds break you need to reheat them again.

 

9. when the cheese is smooth and shiny it is ready to eat. If you want to eat it later cover it and refrigerate.

 

Yield: ¾ to 1 pound

 

Use of the by product of whey is a whole other venture.

 

Recipe recap made by RRP.

Ron
Dunlap, IL

Comments

  • Federalist226Federalist226 Posts: 82
    edited August 2013
    Great write-up! One question, is there any workaround so you don't have to use the microwave? For some reason I have an aversion to using the micro.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    Great write-up! One question, is there any workaround so you don't have to use the microwave? For some reason I have an aversion to using the micro.
    This is verbatim from the book:

    No microwave?

    If you don't have a microwave, you may want to put on heavy rubber gloves at this point (after step #5.)
    Heat the reserved whey to at least 175. Add 1/4 cup of cheese salt to the whey. Shape the curd into one or more balls, put them in a ladle or strainer, and dip them into the hot whey for several seconds. Knead the curd with spoons between each dip and repeat this process several times until the curd is smooth and pliable.
     


    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • BigWaderBigWader Posts: 490

    how long does the process take?  Is this a weeknight after the kids are in bed sort of task (9:30ish) or a Sunday afternoon thing?

    This looks awesome by the way... it is like bocconcini at this point?

     

    Large BGE

     

  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,590

    man, great write-up @RRP. I am definitely going to give this a shot.

    SWMBO is going to look at my like I have three heads now--- hanging meat in the kitchen, fridge packed with curing bacon, sitting at kitchen table using meat glue to adhere a stuffed tenderloin, and fondling curds....

    :))
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • bccomstockbccomstock Posts: 326
    edited August 2013
    BigWader said:

    how long does the process take?  Is this a weeknight after the kids are in bed sort of task (9:30ish) or a Sunday afternoon thing?

    This looks awesome by the way... it is like bocconcini at this point?


    RRP said:


       


    30 Minute Mozzarella



    ;)
    LBGE
    MS Gulf Coast - Proud member of the Who Dat Nation!
    My Not Frequently Updated Blog: http://datcue.wordpress.com
  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    BigWader said:

    how long does the process take?  Is this a weeknight after the kids are in bed sort of task (9:30ish) or a Sunday afternoon thing?

    This looks awesome by the way... it is like bocconcini at this point?

    Just like the title of the recipe said...30 minutes. That is what it takes to make it, but I always let it cool down about an hour before storing it in the refrig. I just leave mine as one big ball...bocconcini is little more than making it into smaller balls and storing wet in whey. I prefer the more solid so that I can slice or grate it.
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • we made this in the store all the time and only used hot water (no nuker). lots of fun. a trick to storing in the whey is to make the water "as salty as sea water". That means when you taste it, it makes you choke a little :)

    It does not affect the saltiness of the cheese but that way the little balls float and don't flatten out against the bottom of the container.

    Once you are done, you can make your own Ricotta (translates as "re-cooked") cheese from the whey. Like OP said....that's a whole other deal but its still cool to do.

    Nicely done RRP. haven't done this in a while. Might try to find some buffalo milk at the farmers market this weekend.............



  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    Buffalo milk would be interesting. The secret here for those using cow milk is finding the whole milk which has not been ultra pasterized. Our population is 110k , but I can find it in only one grocery store! BTW goat milk can also be used.
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • Thanks RRP. I'm bookmarking this page.
  • J_QueJ_Que Posts: 195
    Bookmarked!
    I knew all the rules, but the rules did not know me.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,147
    I've made this using the microwave method - came out good.  I did get a weird brown "crust" on the cheese on the pizza, but it tasted fine.  Just didn't behave the same as the harder store-bought mozz. 

    Here's a link to finding good cheese making milk.   http://www.survivalschool.com/articles/Milk_for_Cheese_Making.htm
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    edited August 2013


    I have not experienced that issue in all the times I have followed this recipe, nor the many pizzas I have made using it. BTW the book also listed these troubleshooting hints.

     For a firmer cheese, use more rennet. If your cheese is too hard, use less rennet. If the curds turn into the consistency of ricotta cheese and will not come together, change the brand of milk- it make have been heat-treated at the factory to too high a temperature. Most of all, be patient. When you get this to work, you will never stop making it!
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • RRP said:
    Buffalo milk would be interesting. The secret here for those using cow milk is finding the whole milk which has not been ultra pasterized. Our population is 110k , but I can find it in only one grocery store! BTW goat milk can also be used.
    buffalo mozzarella is awesome. tons more flavor. It's what all the primo pizzerias use. Give it a try if you can find buffalo milk. 

  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    edited August 2013
    For me to find buffalo milk might be a stretch - BTW I see it is really the milk of water buffalo not our American buffalo as we think roam out West, although being in Texas, maybe you do have the real deal!

     OTOH last week I was challenged to find a source locally of "pure - gas" meaning gasoline that contains no ethanol. Finally found a station in a nearby town that sells it...premium only of course. 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • RRP said:
    For me to find buffalo milk might be a stretch - BTW I see it is really the milk of water buffalo not our American buffalo as we think roam out West, although being in Texas, maybe you do have the real deal!

     OTOH last week I was challenged to find a source locally of "pure - gas" meaning gasoline that contains no ethanol. Finally found a station in a nearby town that sells it...premium only of course. 
    I've done Bison and it was really good. You can get the milk form some euro importers but it's best just to buy the cheese at that point. Not sure i want euro water buffalo milk that's been on a boat for a month :))



  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 11,259
    edited August 2013
    apparently you can get the real deal in Houston. These guys have a farm in OK but looks like they process the dairy and meat in H-Town.


  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    Houston would be a bit of a drive for me...guess I'll just stick with Illinois moo-juice!
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • NsdexterNsdexter Posts: 135
    edited August 2013
    Great write up, only issue I have I I can't get rennet locally, and the shipping doubles the price from the US
    HFX NS
  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    Obviously I don't know where you live but by chance you know anybody who is into home brewing? Rennet is used in that process as well and if you look at the recipe again you'll see it takes very little, so maybe you could buy some that way. I use the liquid rennet meaning it has to stay in the refrig, but it also comes in tablet form.
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,689
    Nsdexter said:

    Great write up, only issue I have I I can't get rennet locally, and the shipping doubles the price from the US

    Check the canning area. Sometimes it is located near pectin.
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 5,302
    Super cool. Thanks for the step by step recipe. I would love to try this.

    And thanks for the link to the water buffalo page, Cen-Tex. Filed away for future use.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256
    CORRECTION : what I meant to say was rennet is often sold by the same stores and suppliers which cater to home brewers. Rennet is not used in beer making.
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • FiremanyzFiremanyz Posts: 411
    Anybody in Maryland that wants to try this, I know of a dairy that only pasturizes to 145. That is the lowest the state of md will allow. It is located on the eastern shore, their website is nicefarmscreamery.com I highly recommend their products as we have been buying from them for the past four years. Also forgot to add the milk is not homogenized so you will find cream on top sometimes. They do one market across the bridge on Sundays in Annapolis. Check them out. Also his butter if AWSOME.
  • StlScottStlScott Posts: 77

    @RRP - thank you very much for sharing this.  Stupid question ... but is rennet all the same?

    I'm really surprised it's this easy (and look forward to trying it).  The first time you told me about this, I looked it up online ... and the closest I could come was getting a curd of mozzarella and building off of that.   

    StlScott

  • RRPRRP Posts: 13,256

    Scott,

    Natural calf rennet is taken from the stomachs of young calves slaughtered for veal. It can also come from slaughtered young goats and sheep. Vegetable rennet and mold rennet are popular substitutes and produce the same coagulating properties in milk for cheese making.

    Ron

     

    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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