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Well that was embarrassing...

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Comments

  • gpsegggpsegg Posts: 287
    I have had racks of beef back ribs curl......don't really have the answer. others no problem at all cooked the same way....
    George
    Palm Beach Gardens, Fl and Blue Ridge, Ga.
  • hotwheelshotwheels Posts: 73
    edited July 2013
    OK Now we're getting somewhere! :-)  When the ribs curled, were the "curled ribs" tough, dry? How were they? What pit or dome temp did you use?

    People say that Television is bad for you.  It's that bloody Fridge, that's killing me.

  • hotwheels said:



    Only thing I can think of is they were creamated.Too hot too long. Do you have a big dog?
    Dog? Good idea, but I don't think you realize how tough these were.. There's no dog on this earth that could chew these.

    Think he meant dog ribs? I hear great danes are really tough compared to collies or labs.
  • hotwheelshotwheels Posts: 73
    Think he meant dog ribs? I hear great danes are really tough compared to collies or labs.
    I'm sure it's nothing a little Dizzy Pig Seasoning wouldn't fix. lol

    People say that Television is bad for you.  It's that bloody Fridge, that's killing me.

  • LitLit Posts: 3,088
    I really do not like beef ribs but if you cooked them to 190 degrees you way over cooked them. I usually do mine at 250 dome and they are done in 2.5 hours or so. At 300 dome I am guessing those went 4 hours or so to get to 190. I would stick to baby back or st Louis style pork ribs they are much better and more forgiving.
  • MrCookingNurseMrCookingNurse Posts: 3,811
    edited July 2013
    There ya go. Beef ribs are not pork ribs and do not cook the same. I have only cooked one rack of them, but a totally different monster. I did pork ribs Saturday for around 5 hours at 250 and they could have used a little longer, the beef ribs were done around the 3.5-4 hour mark.

    You were given beef ribs like you ordered, just cooked too long


    _______________________________________________

    LBGE & SBGE (big momma and pat)
  • nashbamanashbama Posts: 102
    I'm guessing high heat is the main issue. When I cook pork chops, I'll score the edges or else they will cup when I sear them. The corkscrew effect may be a result of the same thing, the higher heat causes the meat on the edges to cook and shrink faster than the middle.

    The internal temp may also be too high which is why it was dried out. A lot of folks just go with a bend test rather than internal temp. If it can pass the bend test, it's safe to eat.
  • hotwheelshotwheels Posts: 73
    Lit said:
    I really do not like beef ribs but if you cooked them to 190 degrees you way over cooked them. I usually do mine at 250 dome and they are done in 2.5 hours or so. At 300 dome I am guessing those went 4 hours or so to get to 190. I would stick to baby back or st Louis style pork ribs they are much better and more forgiving.

    I certainly have a lot to learn, so I'm going to try the 225-250 on Friday. But I've done about 5 beef rib cooks at 300F dome and pulled at 190-200F at about 3 hours with good results. On this "corkscrew cook" I even did the first 45 minutes at 270.

    Oh well...  Perhaps I'll get 'great' results if I go lower and slower. 

    Pork or beef?  Everyone is different, but I find the beef ribs have more flavour so I will just have to get better at this. :-)

    People say that Television is bad for you.  It's that bloody Fridge, that's killing me.

  • hotwheelshotwheels Posts: 73
    edited July 2013
    Sub par meat seldom produces great results all things being equal from previous cooks.

    After talking to my butcher at a big grocery chain today, I think Fred19Flintstone nailed the answer right from the start. The "corkscrew ribs" were bought at a small mom & pop butcher shop, which probably used a poor grade of beef, possibly from an old cow. The best grades of beef come from steers (meaning castrated male) of certain weight, ages 24 to 30 months old, and then graded by marbling etc.  Years ago my butcher had the same poor results with beef ribs as I did. He said they were not fit to eat, back when this grocery chain sold the cheap poor quality beef ribs. The chain had so many complaints, they stopped selling the poor grade beef ribs. When cows age and become unable to produce milk, they are used for hamburger...,  and ribs, etc are sold off very cheaply.  Funny as it sounds,  I probably served up an old cow to my guests.  From now on I only buy Prime grade.

    So I'm a little hesitant, but tommorrow I'm serving beef back ribs again. Prime grade ribs.  Yes, from some poor young castrated steer. Thanks for all the tips and help.
     

    People say that Television is bad for you.  It's that bloody Fridge, that's killing me.

  • Choice beef is usually fine too. Just avoid select like the plague.
  • hotwheelshotwheels Posts: 73

    Dino ribs and pork back ribs!! Friends were impressed. Ribs were probably the best I've done yet, so I'm getting better.

    Slow cooked at 225 (no foil) rather than 300; pulled around 185. Pork ribs were not as juicy as the beef, but good.

    Before 225F.JPG
    3264 x 2448 - 3M
    after 225F.JPG
    3264 x 2448 - 3M

    People say that Television is bad for you.  It's that bloody Fridge, that's killing me.

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