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Pressure treated or no? Table question

Did you build your table with pressure treated wood? If not, how did you protect it from the weather?
Chicago, Illinois

Comments

  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 736
    Pressure treated wood is treated with some nasty stuff to keep bugs from eating it.  You do not want food around pressure treated wood.
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,718
    Many people have built tables with pressure treated except for the top where foot can contact - where they use a more expensive, but weather resistant material.

    Also let it be known that they make some nice treated woods - kiln dried and heat-treated.  You can use almost any wood if you protect it properly - extreme treatments - marine epoxy, more common - spar varnish.  Even decking sealant helps, or oils.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • I used pressure treated wood because it was cheaper and I am a poor boy so every dollar saved is good. I keep mine under an outside cover and it works pretty well. because pressure treated wood does have some toxic chemicals in don't allow the food to come into contact with it. also expect some cracking and some warping. By the way, "if you want to double your money, fold it and put it back in your pocket, a quote from Mark Twain."
    San Angelo, texas
  • The Naked WhizThe Naked Whiz Posts: 7,779
    Hmmm.  Picnic tables are often made of pressure treated lumber. 

    The Naked Whiz
  • Mine is not pressure treated.  We used three coats of spar eurathane on everything.  For additional protection, we bought just a regular tarp at Lowes and SWMBO, handy lady that she is, sewed it up so it's a decent looking cover.

    Damascus, VA.  Friendliest town on the Appalachian Trail.

    LBGE Aug 2012, SBGE Feb 2014

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,718
    Hmmm.  Picnic tables are often made of pressure treated lumber. 

    That's a good point.  Personally, I don't prep or put food directly on my egg table.  Ever.  I use foil or cookie pans or baking pans.  Maybe some people do, and, in case they've lived under a rock, they should know that's a bad idea because the treatment chemicals are poisonous.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • The Naked WhizThe Naked Whiz Posts: 7,779
    Exactly nolaegghead.  My table was tile and red oak, but the food never touched the table, nevertheless.

    The Naked Whiz
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,135
    maybe the fda lives under a rock or maybe i just cant find real info trying to google it but this is all i could find
    :))

    Why shouldn’t treated wood be used for cutting boards or countertops?

    The Food and Drug Administration discourages the use of any wood, treated or untreated, for cutting boards and countertops because these surfaces can become gouged during food preparation. Bacteria can grow in these gouges, creating unsanitary conditions in your kitchen. Only hard, abrasion-resistant materials should be used for cutting surfaces.


  • The Naked WhizThe Naked Whiz Posts: 7,779
    The FDA lives under a rock.  I've read a study that showed that wood cutting boards when properly santized have less bacteria on them than artificial surfaces.  But again, why would anyone put the food in touch with the wood on an outdoor table.  I'd be more worried about the bird crap.
    The Naked Whiz
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,718
    The FDA lives under a rock.  I've read a study that showed that wood cutting boards when properly santized have less bacteria on them than artificial surfaces.  But again, why would anyone put the food in touch with the wood on an outdoor table.  I'd be more worried about the bird crap.
    Out of the 6 or 7 cutting boards I have, only one is plastic, and I throw it in the dishwasher after using it.  I prefer wood.  It's been common knowledge for years that wood cutting boards are safe.  I present this article back from the early '90s.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1993/02/10/health/wooden-cutting-boards-found-safer-than-plastic.html

    That said, I wash my wood cutting boards and let them dry out before reusing them.  (hence the reason I have so many cutting boards). 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,135
    The FDA lives under a rock.  I've read a study that showed that wood cutting boards when properly santized have less bacteria on them than artificial surfaces.  But again, why would anyone put the food in touch with the wood on an outdoor table.  I'd be more worried about the bird crap.
    ive been using the same old board at the camp to clean trout and salmon for 8 years now, all its gotten is a cold water rinse and its been outside on the table the whole time
    :D chartered fishing boats do the same with a seawater rinse and those boats get plastered with seagull crap
    :)) it does happen
    :D
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 452
    Like others have said, you probably wouldn't be putting the food directly on the wood, so maybe it isn't a big deal; nonetheless, just to be cautious, I wouldn't use pressure treated lumber.  I just prefer to avoid toxic materials as best I can.  Seems like particularly solid advice if you've got kids hanging around.  I built my table of redwood.  It hardly rains where I am, so I just sealed it with Thompson's and called it a day.  
    Southern California
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