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Sunday Brisket

13 pound brisket went on to the Egg at 9 Saturday evening with the dome at 250.  Got up this morning, temp fell to 235 and adjusted back to 250.  Finished up at 2:30 this afternoon internal temp was 195.  Tested multiple points with the probe...soft as butter.  Went to the cooler for 3 1/2 hours, dinner at 6.  Brisket came out pretty well, decent smoke, tender and moist.

 

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Comments

  • BustersdadBustersdad Posts: 197
    Apologies for the duplicate pic
  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,179
    Looks good. I'd eat that.
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • fljoemonfljoemon Posts: 313
    Sorry for the newb question ... never made a brisket before .. why put it in the cooler? Also when you serve do you warm it after you take it out of the cooler?
    LBGE & Mini
    Orlando, FL
  • fljoemonfljoemon Posts: 313
    edited July 2013
    Okay found the answer ... it is just sticking in a cooler box without any ice :-) .. so basically the hot brisket stays hot in an aluminum foil.

    Here's the answer I found:
    Coolering the brisket just allows it to continue cook under its own heat loads without the risk of drying it out with higher temps. A 180 degree brisket will hold 180 for a few hours and continue to break down, whereas continuing to cook at 220 aids in drying out before its done tenderizing. 

    The term "Coolering", as used often, is a technique used to hold a temperature until ready to be served.. There is no ice involved as would be in "cooling" to bring a temperature down to a desired level... Just using the insulation of a cooler to retain heat given off by the cooked meat in the cooler.
    LBGE & Mini
    Orlando, FL
  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,179
    fljoemon said:
    Sorry for the newb question ... never made a brisket before .. why put it in the cooler? Also when you serve do you warm it after you take it out of the cooler?

    It actually goes into the cooler to keep it hot. You can pre warm the cooler with hot water, dump it out and dry it. Wrap the meat (also works for pulled pork) in heavy duty foil, pack it in towels and place it in the cooler to keep it hot. It will stay hot for hours, so if done early, you can keep it until ready to eat. You will see references to FTC - Foil, Towel, Cooler. Used in catering as a faux cambro to keep meet hot until ready to serve.
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • NJ_BBQNJ_BBQ Posts: 77
    Tjcoley said:
    fljoemon said:
    Sorry for the newb question ... never made a brisket before .. why put it in the cooler? Also when you serve do you warm it after you take it out of the cooler?

    It actually goes into the cooler to keep it hot. You can pre warm the cooler with hot water, dump it out and dry it. Wrap the meat (also works for pulled pork) in heavy duty foil, pack it in towels and place it in the cooler to keep it hot. It will stay hot for hours, so if done early, you can keep it until ready to eat. You will see references to FTC - Foil, Towel, Cooler. Used in catering as a faux cambro to keep meet hot until ready to serve.
    Wouldn't doing FTC leave you with a soft soggy bark?
  • TerrebanditTerrebandit Posts: 1,063
    I did one today too and yours looks much better. Did you monitor the temp in the flat? Any other tricks for keeping it so moist?
    Dave - Austin, TX
  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,179
    NJ_BBQ said:
    Tjcoley said:
    fljoemon said:
    Sorry for the newb question ... never made a brisket before .. why put it in the cooler? Also when you serve do you warm it after you take it out of the cooler?

    It actually goes into the cooler to keep it hot. You can pre warm the cooler with hot water, dump it out and dry it. Wrap the meat (also works for pulled pork) in heavy duty foil, pack it in towels and place it in the cooler to keep it hot. It will stay hot for hours, so if done early, you can keep it until ready to eat. You will see references to FTC - Foil, Towel, Cooler. Used in catering as a faux cambro to keep meet hot until ready to serve.
    Wouldn't doing FTC leave you with a soft soggy bark?
    You may sacrifice some bark, however, if done earlier than planned, it's a great way to keep it until ready.  I've FTC'd a brisket for 5 hours, and still had great bark.  
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • BustersdadBustersdad Posts: 197
    @Terrebandit, no I only have a single probe inserted in thickest part of the brisket. Part of it is luck of the draw with the piece of meat. I think the quality of my brisket cooks has improved with my improved contol of the temp...on the overnite part of the cook, only lost 15 degrees, otherwise pegged at 250.
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632

    Fantastic looking brisket!! I just picked one up from Tom Thumb yesterday. Prices were down to $1.49 a lb (due to 4th coming up). Got a $10 off coupon on checkout, gonna go back and get another one today (will probably come out to $6 after the coupon.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • TerrebanditTerrebandit Posts: 1,063
    @Terrebandit, no I only have a single probe inserted in thickest part of the brisket. Part of it is luck of the draw with the piece of meat. I think the quality of my brisket cooks has improved with my improved contol of the temp...on the overnite part of the cook, only lost 15 degrees, otherwise pegged at 250.

    thanks for that tip. Mine seems to hold pretty steady at 265, so I night take a run at that next time.
    Dave - Austin, TX
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