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Just bought my first BGE!

Hello Eggheads, i just bought my first BGE. It's just my fiancee and i so we went with the medium. I'm excited to get to cooking on it but was hoping someone can give me some rookie pointers and what i should cook first to properly season the egg. Thanks! 
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Comments

  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    "Fiancee" ??  how is she gonna act when your spending more time with your egg than her??  What kind of accessories did you get with it -- that will determine just what you can cook?
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  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,685
    Welcome aboard and very perceptive with the header "my first BGE!".  And just to get you up-to-speed, fiancee can be shortened to SWMBO-as the future will show :)
    Louisville
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  • "Fiancee" ??  how is she gonna act when your spending more time with your egg than her??  What kind of accessories did you get with it -- that will determine just what you can cook?
    I have the plate setter, rib rack and chicken rack that you fill with beer. Any must haves? and yes "Fiancee" lol 
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,415
    edited June 2013
    Make sure you get the egg in the prenuptial agreement. ;)

    Buy a young yard bird and try a spatchcock chicken.  Keep the legs in the back where it's hotter, cook direct around 350-400 until the breast is 160.  Try raising the grid if you can, if you can't, keep the temps down to 300-350.

    Welcome to the club!


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • GreenhawKGreenhawK Posts: 398
    I suggest a Boston Butt for your first cook.  It is a good meat to practice temp stability on, is forgiving, and the fat content will help season your egg.  

    Congratulations on your new Egg
    Large BGE

    Decatur, AL
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  • Thanks for the suggestions! I figured a low and slow cook might be best at first before i got into searing with it. 
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  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    Well -- understand the butt might be an all night thing??  The spatchcocked chicken about an hour.  You could do the spatchcocked chicken indirect(using the platesetter with the legs up) with your grid supported off the platesetter legs -- at gasket level.  Cook the chicken at 350 to 375 degrees -- hopefully you have something to tell you the internal temperatures of the breast and thigh?  165 in the breast and 180 in the thigh. 
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  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 751
    You'll need four things: Dead animal, whole or parts depending on your choice of animal. Lump charcoal. something to ignite the charcoal. And most importantly something to keep you hydrated as you slave away preparing delicious dinners for your loved ones. Any one of these four items will create endless discussion on this forum. Welcome to the club.
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
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  • sharhammsharhamm Posts: 254
    Go to the ceramic grill store and get a woo for more cooking space. You'll need a grid lifter, see third eye for thst. Eggware for a stainless steal cap. Let's not forget a thick pizza stone. A high que grid to replsce the cast iron one. How about a cast iron grill for those great grill marks? That's a good start for now.
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  • tulocaytulocay Posts: 1,688
    thermapen is a must IMHO
    LBGE, Marietta, GA
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  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 2,902
    I suggest doing a dry run first just to get used to how the egg reacts with different temp setting.

    By dry I mean no food. I do however suggest having many adult beverages during said dry run.

    ___________________________________

     

     LBGE,SBGE, and a mini makes three......Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

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  • td66snrf said:
    You'll need four things: Dead animal, whole or parts depending on your choice of animal. Lump charcoal. something to ignite the charcoal. And most importantly something to keep you hydrated as you slave away preparing delicious dinners for your loved ones. Any one of these four items will create endless discussion on this forum. Welcome to the club.
    I like the way you think. 

    Charlie i was thinking about using the rib rack but on the chicken roasting side or is it better to do spatchcock style? 
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  • HibbyHibby Posts: 420
    Welcome to the party.
    Conservative stalwart in Thornville, Ohio
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  • tulocay said:

    thermapen is a must IMHO

    This

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  • egger aveegger ave Posts: 540
    Welcome to the cult.. Have fun and cook some great BBQ.
    1 Large BGE, 1 Mini BGE, Original wife and 4 dogs living in the heart of BBQ country in Round Rock Texas. "Friends don't let friends cook with propane"
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  • thermapen is a must IMHO
    This
    What is it? a BGE product? 
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  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    The spatchcocked chicken just lays spread eagle on the grid at gasket level..   Understand there are many options on your equipment needs, and many manufacturers.  Some will work with  others, some will not, and you are married to that manufacturer.  And there are many ways to cook and get the same results -- some control temperature with electronic controllers, others with their vents -- top vent, or bottom vent, some both vents.  You kind of got to absorb what you read here BEFORE buying something that you might not really use that much.  As someone mentioned, most eggers cook "to internal meat temperatures", a very important tool is "something" to determine this temperature.  Most here will recommend the Thermapen.  It is quality equipment, fast reacting, and extreamly accurate.  There are other units that can do the same thing, and are cheaper--  but the Thermapen is the way to go.  Buy your "fiancee" one as an engagement present.....then borrow it from her!!! >:D<
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  • jccbone62jccbone62 Posts: 194
    Welcome to the club. Patience is the key!
    XL owner in Wichita, KS
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  • If low and slow is your plan you will definitely need a Maverick.
    LBGE 2013 SBGE 2014
    Columbus IN
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  • LowflyerLowflyer Posts: 734
    Congrats and welcome aboard!!!
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  • StreetgliderStreetglider Posts: 103
    Welcome, I vote for the spatchcock chicken, SWMBO says it the best chicken she's ever had.

    _________________________________________________

    LBGE, Grill Extender, 5 burner Char-Broil gasser that hold my eggessories
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  • sariverssarivers Posts: 67
    Welcome. I am relative new and this forum is a great place to learn. I would suggest to keep it simple to begin with; egg, platesetter and a digital meat themometer. Hamburgers are easy. I also like the spatchcock chicken. Pork butt is my favorite but my first time was an all nighter, 18 hours. If you cook low and slow you should plan on at least 2 hours per pound. Best grill I've ever owned.
    Columbia, SC

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  • freddyjfreddyj Posts: 121
    Congrats dude, you're going to love everything about it.
    Kamado Joe Big Joe, Classic & Junior
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  • Welcome.  Chicken or burgers to get the hang of things.  Butt for low and slow as they are forgiving.  Don't get discouraged with temp control, undershoot and make small adjustments with your air flow.  Enjoy

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  • TarHeelBBQTarHeelBBQ Posts: 282
    You will love it!!! Simple to start with. Then branch out
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  • bboulierbboulier Posts: 233
    TarHeelBBQ has the right idea.  Start simple.  First step: read the Naked Whiz's introduction to Kamado cookers (http://www.nakedwhiz.com/nwindex.htm).  He has lots of good advice.  Second step:  Start a good fire. Use lump charcoal and firestarters (BGE or Rutland are fine).  After startng the fire, let it run for about 10 minutes with the top of the BGE open and the bottom vent wide open.   Then, close the top down and close the vent to about 1/2 inch or so.  Let sit for about 10 minutes.  You can control the fire with the vent and the daisy wheel to get the proper temperature for cooking. (Note: there are more advanced - and exciting - methods of starting fires.)  When you no longer smell any "off" odors, you are ready to cook. Third step....That's up to you and depends on what you are cooking.  Burgers and chicken are good starters.  There is definitely a learning curve.  Mistakes are opportunities for improvement.  You will find the forum  will offer lots of good advice.
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  • WalrusBBQWalrusBBQ Posts: 151
    I suggest a boston butt, research Elder Ward style. Oh, and your favorite case of beer.

    Enjoy!
    ------------
    Beers & BBQ

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  • Thanks for all the advice, i think i'm going to go with the spatchcock chicken, i'll post pics. Also i dont know what "SWMBO" means lol 
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  • She Who Must Be Obeyed ;). welcome aboard

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  • BuckeyeBobBuckeyeBob Posts: 640
    My best advice is to make sure you give it time to heat up before you put your meat on. The early smoke can be a little harsh and give an off flavor to your food. Give it a bout twenty minutes and you will notice a difference in the smoke smell.
    Clarendon Hills, IL
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