Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Here are some of our new favorite non-beef burgers: Italian Turkey Burger, Grilled Tuna Burger and Goat Cheese Portobello Burger. You’ll want to perfect these before football season starts up in a few weeks! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Does smoke help?

When ever I add smoke it tastes like I am eating some deck boards and not the good kind! Did some pork tenderloin raised direct to 155F and pulled. I should have pulled at 140F but pork scares me. Added a handful of hickory chips and that's all I could taste. Are there any rules for what kind of smoke and how much to add to certain meats? It looks good though.
"Sometimes you eat the bear and sometimes............. Well, he eats you"

Comments

  • Gooey1Gooey1 Posts: 71
    Sorry forgot pics
    image.jpg
    2057 x 1536 - 707K
    image.jpg
    2056 x 1536 - 886K
    "Sometimes you eat the bear and sometimes............. Well, he eats you"
  • burr_baby33burr_baby33 Posts: 501
    I'm not an expert on the wood. For salmon I prefer alder. On Saturday I cooked a chuck roast with apple wood. It was excellent. Some of the forum experts like the various fruitwoods. I'll stick with them for beef and pork.
  • Gooey1Gooey1 Posts: 71
    Thanks
    "Sometimes you eat the bear and sometimes............. Well, he eats you"
  • brianwdmnbrianwdmn Posts: 358
    Smoke flavor is highly subjective. Some people don't appreciate the subtleties of smoke and we cooks loose objectivity due to being too close to the process. Some foods soak up more of the flavor (vegetables) and different meats react differently. Keep practicing, and learn what works for you and your family.
    Marietta, East Cobb, GA
  • Gooey1Gooey1 Posts: 71
    Thanks Brian I will keep practicing.
    "Sometimes you eat the bear and sometimes............. Well, he eats you"
  • dougbackerdougbacker Posts: 277
    I did a ring boloney on the MINI tonite and hit with some pecan and it was great. SWMBO even thought so

    --------------------------------------------------------
    South Dakota
    KBØQBT
    Large BGE, 
    Mini BGE
    36" Blackstone Griddle
    Phoenix Gasser
    Cyber Q WIFI

    And a deck box full of toy's


  • It definitely depends on what you are cooking. For most all cooks that are a little slower, I add the wood only on the top so only smoke early. The food takes all it needs early on. If you keep adding it is too much in my opinion.
    LBGE and recently added SBGE
    Columbus IN
  • RLeeperRLeeper Posts: 478
    For pork tenderloins I like to use jack Daniels chips or apple. Not too strong of a smoke taste IMHO
    Extra Large, Large, and Mini. Tucker, GA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,016
    Gooey1 said:
    When ever I add smoke it tastes like I am eating some deck boards and not the good kind! Did some pork tenderloin raised direct to 155F and pulled. I should have pulled at 140F but pork scares me. Added a handful of hickory chips and that's all I could taste. Are there any rules for what kind of smoke and how much to add to certain meats? It looks good though.
    Hickory is one of the strongest smoke woods.  I wouldn't use it for pork (actually I have, and that's why I don't anymore).  Stick with fruit woods for pork if you're going to smoke it.  Beef - Hickory, mesquite or oak are good. Oak is my favorite.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,847

    Here's a link to a chart that gives a description of wood types and preferred uses-all in the eyes of the consumer.  FWIW-

    http://www.fruitawoodchunks.com/wosmch.html 

    Louisville
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,968
    You can't go wrong with cherry for pork.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • Gooey1Gooey1 Posts: 71
    Thanks guys.
    "Sometimes you eat the bear and sometimes............. Well, he eats you"
  • KennyLeeKennyLee Posts: 527
    Or apple if you want something milder.  I love hickory most of the time for pork, but I love some smoke flavor. However hickory (along with some others, mesquite for example) can be more harsh whereas the fruit woods are milder.

    LBGE

    Cedar table w/granite top

    Ceramic Grillworks two-tier swing rack

    Perpetual cooler of ice-cold beer

  • lousubcap said:

    Here's a link to a chart that gives a description of wood types and preferred uses-all in the eyes of the consumer.  FWIW-

    http://www.fruitawoodchunks.com/wosmch.html 


    Wicked link *bookmarked*
  • AcnAcn Posts: 423
    I agree you need to experiment and find out how much and what kind of smoke flavor you and the family like. I know that my wife and daughter aren't huge fans of smoke flavor, so I don't add tons of chunks/chips and I stick to milder woods, like alder, maple, pecan, apple and cherry, plus the ubiquitous cedar planks.

    It is all a journey, although I would probably suggest starting small - as you've found out, too little smoke is better than too much.

    LBGE

    Pikesville, MD

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,261

    No mentioned, but make sure you are clearing the VOC's before food goes on - that could be part of the deckboard taste.

    Try small amounts of chips first, throw a handfull on right before the meat goes on.  Limited amount of smoke from those, since they are consumed pretty fast.   If you like, then progress up the smoke amount or switch to a different wood.   I am a big believer in different woods.  I love Hickory ( but not on chicken ) - and don't really care for mesquite on anything.   Love cherry on chicken.

    Also, thinking I have read somewhere that USDA lowered the reccomended meat temp for pork to 145.   I know thats what I am finishing at now - and I like it alot better.  Used to be a 160 guy.  Someone else on here may know more accurately than me.

    Cookin in Texas
  • Gooey1Gooey1 Posts: 71
    In Ontario we have to overlook everything. Try ordering a medium well burger at a restaurant ! I will try the pork at 145. Thanks.
    "Sometimes you eat the bear and sometimes............. Well, he eats you"
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,016
    boatbum said:

    Also, thinking I have read somewhere that USDA lowered the reccomended meat temp for pork to 145.   I know thats what I am finishing at now - and I like it alot better.  Used to be a 160 guy.  Someone else on here may know more accurately than me.

    Yep.  It's 145 F minimum for every fresh meat except poultry and ground, which is 165. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

Sign In or Register to comment.