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Homemade Pizza Sauce

The wife and I just did our first successful canning adventure yesterday. Now I want to find a recipe for homemade pizza sauce since we eat lots of pizza here. Any suggestions?
Mark Annville, PA

Comments

  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 6,855
    This one's awesome! One of these days, I may try a different one, but I sure am happy with this!

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

    "Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screwtop jars. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don't deserve to eat garlic." Bourdain
  • GA_DawgsGA_Dawgs Posts: 273
    I do a no cook sauce. Canned tomatoes (San Marzano or other plum type), if not home canned buy low/no sodium. Dried oregano, salt, pepper, garlic powder and onion powder. I don't have measurements since unusually go by taste but for a 28oz. can of tomatoes it's probably 1/2 to 1 tsp oregano, salt and garlic powder. 1/2 tsp pepper and onion powder. I crush the tomatoes up in my fingers and mix everything. Once it is mixed I put it in a mason jar in the fridge and keep it until its gone.
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    Ever try a "no sauce" pizza?  did one by error and it came out pretty good! 
  • EggPowerEggPower Posts: 25
    Large can whole peeled plum tomatoes. Puree and set aside. In a large CI skillet add tbs olive oil, and brown a couple diced garlic cloves. Maybe two minutes. Add the tomatoe puree and bring to simmer on medium heat. Reduce heat, add pinch of salt and pepper. When reduced, add fresh diced basil, 4 or 5 medium leaves. Probably about 20 minutes or so total cooking time. This should be enough for two pizzas. Easy and delicious.
  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    No need to ever cook your pizza sauce. There are many schools of though here, however, pizza sauce is not pasta sauce.  They are spiced differently and meant to compliment a vast array of toppings.  Your typical Margherita pizza uses a very simple tomato sauce, usually plum tomatoes crushed by hand with most of the watery juice drained off.  Our family was in the pizza businees for many years and I have my family recipe which we like and I think it is a good sauce.  Since I only make small batches now I have improvised it somewhat while maintaining the original taste.  We used a canned tomato product not available to the general public called Bonta.  It is a very thick sauce with citric acid and a little salt added.  It had to be watered down because of the concentration.  Over the years I have experimented and found a good mix that almost duplicates the recipe.  I use one 28 oz canned of crushed tomatoes,  

    At my local Italian deli they carry a brand called 6-in-1 crushed tomatoes in 28 oz cans.  This brand is a commercial grade and also comes in #10 cans which are about 1 gallon size.  This is a good start for anyone who wants to add their own spices to taste.

    1 - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes
    1 - 14 oz can tomato paste

    Add enough water to get the consistency you like, sometimes I will add some red wine to it.
    1 Tsp sea salt
    1 Tsp black pepper
    2 Tsp paprika
    1/2 to 1 Tsp garlic powder
    2 - 3 Tsp dried parsley or fresh if in season
    2 - 3 Tsp dried oregano
    Mix in whatever else you like, however, keep it simple and you will be amazed at the results.

    Mix it and taste for saltiness and then let it sit for several hours before tasting again.  I always make my sauce a day in advance so all the flavors marinate and the sauce will thicken as well.  San Marzano tomatoes are a myth.  The only true San Marzano tomatoes come from the Naples area of Italy and are grown in the rich volcanic soil near Mt Vesuvius.  I pay anywhere from $1.89 to $2.69 for a 28 oz can of 6-in-1 tomatoes which are grown in Escondito California.  Escalon has a factory near the tomato farms and the tomatoes are picked and put into the canning process the same day with no artificial ingredients. 

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,970
    Thanks Sam. Good tips. I want to can the sauce because I have 2 little ones that require lots of attention and I'm tired of buying canned sauce that is sub par. Also, we get fresh produce delivered weekly as part of our local farm CSA. The tomatoes will be pouring in soon.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 927
    Not a true pizza sauce but very simple and one of the bests I have found... As always quality tomatoes are the key http://www.food.com/recipe/10-minute-tomato-sauce-from-americas-test-kitchen-429838
    Greensboro, NC
  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    If you are using fresh tomatoes it is important to remove much of the watery seeds and pith.  Use Roma or similar tomatoes that make a good consistency sauce.  Sterilize all your parts and use the water bath process.  Do not premix with spices before canning.  Always mix spices fresh with your tomatoes.

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    I've been doing this with excellent results:

    Brush the dough with olive oil. Add seasonings (fresh is better)...oil picks up the aromatics.  Next the cheese.  Then I slice roma tomatoes very thin and cover the cheese.  Add the other toppings.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,525
    edited June 2013
    @SamFerrise,
    What do you mean by "San Marzano tomatoes are a myth" I can get Cento and Wegmans store brand. Both are products of Italy and say "from the volcanic soil near Naples". Both have DOP certification. Am I missing something?

    image

    image
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    @Eggcelsior  I thought the same thing.  I had been buying those Cento San Marzanos for pizza until I decided that I couldn't tell the difference between those $5 cans and $1.50 generic stewed romas.  I really like fresh tomatoes on my pizza.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    My grandmother or mother would laugh at products like Cento.  Bend over and get reamed.
    You are being ripped off if you think you are getting Sam Marzano tomatoes.  It is called retail fraud and it is quite common in food labeling.  Wegmann? Real Italian?  You must be drinking something special.  Unless you have been to Naples or Campania you don't know the difference.  I have family in both areas and I have been to Campania about 6 times.  Americans will never see those tomatoes.  Same is true of the best Olive Oils.  95% of the best Olive Oils from Spain and Italy never see the American shores.  Americans are being ripped off every day by labels.  The best tomatoes in the USA come from San Juaquin, Escondito, El Segundo and the Central Valley area of California.  The very best of the crops go to the commercial processors like Stanislaus and Escalon.  Those products are a true rival to San Marzano tomatoes.  This is fact and not conjecture.  The very best restaurants have been using Stanislaus tomato products for more than 80 years.  My Mother's garden grown tomatoes were some of the best tomatoes I have ever had.  The seeds were save from each year's crop for the next.  We had tomatoes from seeds that spanned 50 years. 

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,199
    Thanks, @SamFerrise for the sauce recipe. All stuff I can keep on hand. I'm glad you mentioned letting it sit for a day. Makes sense.

    There is a pizzaria about 35 miles away that makes close to Neopolitan style. The owner/chef is quite picky about his ingredients. He does use tomato sauce from California, because he finds it close enough to San Marzano, and it helps keep the cost down. I will have to look for some.
  • JRWhiteeJRWhitee Posts: 1,807
    Thanks Sam bookmarked for sure. 
                                                                        
    _________________________________________________

    Large BGE 2006, Small BGE 2014, Adjustable Rig R&B, PSWoo3, Thermapen.
    Weber Gasser for the Wife. 
    Founding Member of the Green Man Group cooking team.
    Johns Creek, Georgia
  • lilwootylilwooty Posts: 179
    Try a garlic white sauce for a little variety.  Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan over low heat.  Add 2 tablespoons flour and keep stirring till you get a blonde roux.  Add 1 cup milk stirring constantly until thickened.  Add 1 teaspoon granulated garlic and salt and pepper to taste.  Finish with 1/2 cup grated parmesan or romano cheese.  Stir over low heat until the cheese is completely melted in the sauce.  You can add a little more milk if you get it too thick.  My family always requests this sauce when we do pizza on the egg.

    Living Large and XL

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,525
    Sam,
    I asked for clarification, not for you to give me some fatuous answer. I was just showing examples of what is available at my local grocery store. You offer no proof besides subjective experience. 

    I go by labels like this:

    image

    If this is falsified, the company is violating European Union Law. I would appreciate some sources from you, otherwise you are just cynical. 

  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    Not!!

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,159
    Are too are too!

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    My grandmother or mother would laugh at products like Cento.  Bend over and get reamed.
    You are being ripped off if you think you are getting Sam Marzano tomatoes.  It is called retail fraud and it is quite common in food labeling.  Wegmann? Real Italian?  You must be drinking something special.  Unless you have been to Naples or Campania you don't know the difference.  I have family in both areas and I have been to Campania about 6 times.  Americans will never see those tomatoes.  Same is true of the best Olive Oils.  95% of the best Olive Oils from Spain and Italy never see the American shores.  Americans are being ripped off every day by labels.  The best tomatoes in the USA come from San Juaquin, Escondito, El Segundo and the Central Valley area of California.  The very best of the crops go to the commercial processors like Stanislaus and Escalon.  Those products are a true rival to San Marzano tomatoes.  This is fact and not conjecture.  The very best restaurants have been using Stanislaus tomato products for more than 80 years.  My Mother's garden grown tomatoes were some of the best tomatoes I have ever had.  The seeds were save from each year's crop for the next.  We had tomatoes from seeds that spanned 50 years. 
    If what you say is true about Cento, they're pulling off a giant international scam.  Read this: http://www.cento.com/sanmarzano/sanmarzano.html#sthash.N1amxriB.dpbs

    I don't doubt your mom's tomatoes will kick many Italian tomatoes in the nuts with flavor....People here claim Creole tomatoes are the best in the world ("Creole tomato" is grown in the sandy Louisiana delta soil, not a specific variety).
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • 70chevelle70chevelle Posts: 278

    The San Marzano argument has finally reached the Egghead forum!!  I see a lot of this on the pizza forums, and the bottom line is that if you enjoy the DOP labeled San Marzano's that are 'certified' to be san marzano's that's what you should use.  Just because the they put a Wegman's label on a tin can, doesn't mean that Wegman's grew the crops, processed the fruit and shipped it overseas, it just means they put their label on it. 

     

    Anyway, sauces are very personal, and you may not like what is someone elses favorite, so experiment with canned tomatoes, fresh tomatoes, cooked, uncooked, etc.  That's the only way you'll find out what you like best.  I can't help you out on the canning, but another option is what I do.  I take my homegrown roma's when ripe, clean and freeze in 1 gallon ziplock bags.  It doesn't matter for sauce that they break down - or aren't as firm as fresh - when frozen for sauce.  I'll also take it a step further and take a few bags out, thaw, crush by hand, drain, season and refreeze in sandwich size ziplocks for individual pizza's.  I've also bought #10 tins of whole or crushed tomatoes, seasoned and froze in sandwich ziplocks.  You have less to worry about as compared to canning. 

     

    Seasoning.  As I've said I don't cook my sauce anymore.  I like the bright tomato taste of fresh sauce cooked on the pizza.  My quick season is with salt, pepper, and Penzey's pizza spice.  I also have a spice mixture recipe (not memorized) that I'll moisten and put in the microwave on defrost for 30 seconds or so, basically until the aromatics are released, and then incorporate it in the crushed tomatoes. 

     

    Good Luck!

  • flynnbobflynnbob Posts: 499
    Thank You Thank You Thank You.  I am going to do Pizza tomorrow night and my sauce sucks.  I can't believe I missed this post - That's what happens when you are working to put food on the egg.  One other question, I often put too much sauce on the pizza.  Any rule of thumb?
    Milton, GA.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    I put about 2 oz sauce on a 180 grams of dough.  I do my dough in metric, sorry.


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    The amount of sauce is a personal choice.  BTW, I always put my sauce on last to prevent soggy pizza.

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    The amount of sauce is a personal choice.  BTW, I always put my sauce on last to prevent soggy pizza.
    That's good advice.

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • mb99zzmb99zz Posts: 182

    The amount of sauce is a personal choice.  BTW, I always put my sauce on last to prevent soggy pizza.


    Hey Sam, do you mean you put your sauce on top of your your cheese and other toppings? Sorry if I didn't follow -- I'm burned after work today.
  • SamFerriseSamFerrise Posts: 544
    Yes, been doing it for 45 years.  I am a light sauce person, just enough for taste.

    Simple ingredients, amazing results!
  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 927
    Sauce on top is often called a tomato pie and pizza is under toppings- I think
    Greensboro, NC
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