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We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

So I cut down my apple tree...

it was a mixed blessing.  Sad to loose the apples, happy to get some wood for smoking.  Need some advise- the wood is not fully rotten, but not fully hard- slightly on the punky side.  Can this wood still be used in the BGE?
"We screw the other guy and pass the savings along to you."

Don't call me "Ace"


Comments

  • Test some out.  If the smell is pleasent, then I think you're good to go.

     "Where the weak grow strong and the strong grow great, Here's to "Down Home," the Old North State!"

    Med & XL

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,410
    I threw the punky stuff in the firewood pile, kept the branches and solid stuff for smoke wood. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • TexanOfTheNorthTexanOfTheNorth Posts: 2,750
    I'll start by saying that I've never done what you're asking and may not be giving the best advice here. My hunch is that you should let the wood dry before using it. For how long, I have no idea. I would also recommend not burning the bark.

    I'd be curious to know how this works outs for you as there are lots of apple orchards in my area and I was thinking about checking around with some of the growers to see about getting some apple wood from them.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,579

    I'll start by saying that I've never done what you're asking and may not be giving the best advice here. My hunch is that you should let the wood dry before using it. For how long, I have no idea. I would also recommend not burning the bark.

    I'd be curious to know how this works outs for you as there are lots of apple orchards in my area and I was thinking about checking around with some of the growers to see about getting some apple wood from them.
    I was thinking the same thing.  I assume the chunks have to be "seasoned" or kiln dried like fire wood.  


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • lilwootylilwooty Posts: 178
    We cut up apple wood quite frequently in my area.  My experience has been to let it age a minimum of six months before using it.  I know some here smoke with green wood but to me green wood gives a funky bitter taste to my cooks.  To each his own.  Try it both ways to see what you prefer.

    Living Large and XL

  • TexanOfTheNorthTexanOfTheNorth Posts: 2,750
    @lilwooty... do you leave the bark on the wood?
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • lilwootylilwooty Posts: 178
    @TexanOfTheNorth  As long as doesn't have any moss or visible fungus on it, I leave it on.  Apple bark is kind of thin compared to oak so it doesn't bother me.  Sometimes a thick bark on oak or pecan will kind of split and loosen itself from the wood during the aging process.  I usually will remove thick bark like that.  Fungus and moss is no bueno.

    Living Large and XL

  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 310

    My total lack of experience in this category can almost immediately void whatever I'm about to say,

    However...

    I saw Myron Mixon harvesting peach and pecan wood for an upcoming competition.  He said he was looking for pieces of wood with sap on it, and that it was the sap that "flavored" the smoke.  I understood that to mean he wanted to use fresh wood chunks in his cooks, and didn't need to dry them out prior to use.  I could be way off.  If I am, please let me know.  I'd hate to be spreading lies on the forum.  

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • lilwootylilwooty Posts: 178
    Myron Mixon does indeed do that.  He also uses charcoal lighter fluid to start his fires which shocks me.  But he also has won more money in barbeque competitions than anyone else, so it works for him.  He has the trophy's to prove it.  Go figure.  But like was mentioned before, do what YOU like.  I know some people use green wood to smoke with, but it just is not my preference.

    Living Large and XL

  • sariverssarivers Posts: 67
    I've been thinking of doing the same thing with my pear trees. I've never heard of anyone smoking with pear wood. Do you think that would work?
    Columbia, SC

  • TexanOfTheNorthTexanOfTheNorth Posts: 2,750
    I think pear would be similar to apple.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • sariverssarivers Posts: 67
    I was guessing that but have never heard for sure.
    Columbia, SC

  • lilwootylilwooty Posts: 178
    Pear is good.  Mild like peach.

    Living Large and XL

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,410
    Pear is goodhaven't had some for a year or two. My Granny Smith apple is getting low, the branches, <1 1/2" diameter, I use pruning loppers to cut into 2"-3" pieces, bark and all goes in the egg - aged, maybe 6 months. The larger fist sized chunks at least a year and the bark tends to fall off. Apple is pretty tight so it takes a long time to dry. My goto wood. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • sariverssarivers Posts: 67
    Thanks for the info on the pear wood.  That is good to know.
    Columbia, SC

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