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First overnite pork shoulder cook.

With its brand new Nomex gaske and lid properly aligned with the help of some folks here I've started my first overnight cook. I've got some internet friends coming over in the morning to help split some oak that I acquired from a local tree that gave up the ghost about two weeks ago. Should keep us in oak chunks for years. I want to serve pulled pork for lunch.

16 lbs of pork shoulder on at 6 pm. Expect it to go 14 or 15 hours. I loaded the lump a couple of inches above the firebox to ensure plenty of fuel. Intermixed with hickory and cherry. Rubbed down at 5 this morning with Dr BBQ Big Time Rub. It could have been done with a match but it is just too much fun to light the fire starters with a propane torch.  
LBGE - July 2012
Valencia, CA

Comments

  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 2,008
    I've got 5 8 pounders going on my XL in an hour. Rubbed with McCormick pork rub and injected with a concoction of apple juice, pineapple juice, hot sauce, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, brown sugar, and salt. Smoking the. At 250-275 With some cherry chunks.

    You'll be giving those fellows a real treat. They'll all be in the doghouse when they get home because they'll all have eggs loaded in their cars. ;)
    Mark Annville, PA
  • QDudeQDude Posts: 556
    It will probably not take that long to cook them.  My last few cooks of butts this size took 12 hours or less each time.  Cooking at 250-275 degrees.

    A northern Colorado Egghead since 2012!

    XL and a Small BGE.

  • jfarleyjfarley Posts: 145
    I'm going at 230 - 240 dome so they should take a bit longer than at 250-275. If they get done too early my plan is to use the "Faux Cambro" technique on the Amazing Ribs site. They can hold several hours before pulling.

    LBGE - July 2012
    Valencia, CA
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,353
    @jfarley-I'm not trying to be an alarmist but every good sized pork butt or shoulder that I have cooked (granted the biggest was around 11#'s) took around 2 hrs/# at that temp.  You may want to be ready to dial the dome to around 300-350*F to punch it home it you want to FTC(Foil, towel cooler) before consumption. 
    Louisville
  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 348
    My first overnight is going right now as well! A 6lb pork butt. Dome is right at 275, so I expect to hear the Maverick go off around 7:00am. I got nervous after I closed the lid and came to the forum for moral support. Im glad to see we're in the same boat. Good luck jfarley, hope to see pics of your successful cook in the morning.

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • jfarleyjfarley Posts: 145
    Likewise Salty Sam!

    I value your input lousubcap. I've yet to hit the sack so I might kick the temp up a bit. While my AccuRite thermometer is showing 122 degrees internal four afters after the start I know the stall is coming and there are many hours to go. My Thermapen will be the final arbiter. I was only planning to FTC if it got done early. If it gets done at 16 hours it would be in time for lunch. Of course the fuel will likely be spent by then anyway. I've yet to have to refuel for a low and slow.

    SaltySam, we should compare notes afterwords to see how it all came out.

    All that said, I'm going to check the temp again, have another Cuba Libre, go to bed, then see what I've got in the morning. (I am at the age when my prostate will give me a couple of wake up calls at which time I can check on the temp and adjust accordingly,)    
    LBGE - July 2012
    Valencia, CA
  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 348
    It's 1:00am right now. My bedroom is juuuuuuust outside the range of the maverick, so I'm on the couch tonight. 2 hrs in and the grid temp is 216 and falling. Meat is right at 126. I'll likely have to stir the coals to keep the temp from dipping further. Can't sleep!

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • milesbrown4milesbrown4 Posts: 314
    Yep - agree that 275-300 is best.  For some reason that range I have better luck.  Just finished a much smaller sirloin roast.  
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  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 348
    Disaster on my end. I slept for four hours and in that time the coals went out completely. Grid temp fell all the way to 97, and food was at 135. I programmed the maverick to alarm me if it fell below 200, but didn't hear a peep.

    I know I didn't use enough lump and I have trouble maintaining temps below 275 anyway. I sure hope yours went better!

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • jfarleyjfarley Posts: 145
    Wow Salty, very similar results but I think I'll recover. Checked around 2 am found the dome at 300. Should have left it alone. Closed the dampers to adjust down and awoke around 4:30 to find the fire almost completely out. Guess i closed them a little too far. The meat was 152 internal so I restarted the fire and am now going at about 325 dome. Lousubcaps post was right on. Still a lot to learn...
    LBGE - July 2012
    Valencia, CA
  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 348
    I decided that since my fire was out, and there was minimal lump left, that it wasn't worth it to re-light the Egg.  I ended up putting it in the oven at 290 to finish it off. Sacreligious, I know... It took about two more hours to get to 200 degrees.  Just now I FTC'd it, and it should be ready to pull around 10:00am. 

    I inserted a fork and twisted, and it came apart nicely.  The bark still looks great, and it smelled wonderful.  I think I'll be able to salvage the cook. 

    I wish I had tracked the temperature digitally while I was asleep.  When I went to bed, the grid temp was 225 and climbing after I stirred the coals.  Four hours later, it was out.  I have no idea how high the internal temp got, and if I was just re-heating the roast in the oven.  I won't be shocked if it turns out on the dry side for me, but when I put it in the cooler a moment ago, everything seemed dead on.

    After lunch, I'll be buying more lump and I'll be ordering a High Que grate. 

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,353
    A few lessons I have learned on the BGE journey-within reason you cannot load too much lump especially for a low&slow.  I load about half way up the fire ring if I know it's gonna be a long cook.  It seems that most BGE's have a low&slow "sweet spot" somewhere in the neighborhood of 240-270*F (calibrated dome thermo).  Once you know what that is-then aim for that with your cooks.  Don't chase temps-+/- 10-15*F on a many hour cook won't make a difference as all hunks of meat cook at their own pace.  Don't try to "time" the finish-line with any confidence that you will hit the mark.  If anything-aim to finish early and then foil, towel, cooler til time to slice/pull and consume.  Takes a lot of pressure off the cook.   Don't overthink it and have fun!
    Louisville
  • jfarleyjfarley Posts: 145
    I had loaded mine to a couple of inches above the fire ring. To my dismay the fire went out again about 8. Not sure why. Checked the grate to make sure not plugged. I'm in a stall at 181 internal right now. Dome temp 350.
    LBGE - July 2012
    Valencia, CA
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,353
    @jfarley-Every cook is a learning opportunity.  That said, I'm sure the end result will taste great.  As you know, this rig runs on air-flow and fuel. Good luck with the detective work on your latest outage-
    Louisville
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    lousubcap said:
    A few lessons I have learned on the BGE journey-within reason you cannot load too much lump especially for a low&slow.  I load about half way up the fire ring if I know it's gonna be a long cook.  It seems that most BGE's have a low&slow "sweet spot" somewhere in the neighborhood of 240-270*F (calibrated dome thermo).  Once you know what that is-then aim for that with your cooks.  Don't chase temps-+/- 10-15*F on a many hour cook won't make a difference as all hunks of meat cook at their own pace.  Don't try to "time" the finish-line with any confidence that you will hit the mark.  If anything-aim to finish early and then foil, towel, cooler til time to slice/pull and consume.  Takes a lot of pressure off the cook.   Don't overthink it and have fun!
     
    This discribes my egg to the "T"!  When i start a butt, even though it is "turbo style", i am shooting for 225 degrees during "the smoke" portion of the cook, but my egg will always creep up and hang around 270 for at least an hour, then drops down to the programmed temperature.  I was thinking it might be from the pecan chunks burning during the smoke period?  For cooks with tight schedules - noon time lunches - it might be better to cook the butts ahead of time and after getting a good night's sleep, all you face in the morning is warming up the pulled pork....

  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 348
    Unbelievably, this turned out to be the best pork butt I've ever done. It was moist, had excellent bark, tender as can be. I credit a good piece of meat. How'd you fare, @jfarley?

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • jfarleyjfarley Posts: 145
    In the end all came out o-k and lunch was on time. this one was a real eye opener and very humbling for me. just when you think you have everything together things go south on you. I was absolutely stunned my fire went out at the 4:30 am check on the overnight. On top of that it went out again around 8 am. Still don't know why that happened. bottom line, I had some of the best BBQrs in the region over and they all loved the product. Even when things don't go perfect it really is a matter of a certain amount of heat applied over a certain amount of time. We survive to fight again! Thanks to lousubcap and Charlie Tuna for your input.
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    LBGE - July 2012
    Valencia, CA
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    You are welcome.  The end result looks great!!  But for the future, i would recommend learning the "turbo style' method opf cooking pork butt!  This will allow you to cook pulled pork WELL in advance to the serving time and cut all the stress out of the meal!  This way, if(?) you have the time, do a "low and slow", other wise cook a turbo style and know when the meal will be ready. 
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 2,008
    @loussubcap I couldn't have said it better myself.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • Wimbo1029Wimbo1029 Posts: 15
    My advice is to get a DigiQ, or something like it.  It keeps your temps wherever you want all night, letting you sleep.  Yes, it is expensive, but ask yourself it it worth it when you are getting up  3-4 times a night to adjust your dampeners.  It is hard to mess up a Boston Butt, so no big deal if your temps fluctuate a lot during the night.  But if you ever want to do more temperamental foods, it makes a big difference. 

    Hope it turned out great!
  • QDudeQDude Posts: 556
    There really isn't anything magical about low and slow.  For some people, it seems like they are bragging when they say they smoked there meat for 15+ hours.  There is little chance of your egg flaming out at 275.  And pork butts are very forgiving.  I've cooked them from 250 to 350 degrees and every time they came out wonderful.  Maybe I'm wrong about low and slow not being magical but I've never had issues with cooking pork butts, ribs, and brisket at 275 degrees.

    You will get the hang of the egg after a few cooks.  It makes some wonderful food!

    A northern Colorado Egghead since 2012!

    XL and a Small BGE.

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