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Dry Rub question

During a cook on the egg, is there any advantage to adding dry rub to your ribs, butt, or brisket? I read somewhere that you should spray some apple cider, apple juice or beer on the meat, then gently sprinkle the rub on there.

Also, what does adding rub do to the meat, especially ribs after you foil them? Once again I read before you foil to add some  apple cider, apple juice or beer to the foil, then sprinkle some dry rub on the meat and seal it up. What is the purpose of all this, or is it BS?

Comments

  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 1,723
    I bet there's gonna be a lot of comments to that question.

    I only put on rub before going on the grill. Never during the cook. Spray. Apple juice to help stay moist.

    ___________________________________

     

     LBGE,SBGE Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

  • EggHeadinFloridaEggHeadinFlorida Posts: 413
    edited May 2013

    Im open to all comments. Ive always added the rub BEFORE you cook the meat, but never during. Curious to know what this does to the meat.

    I wish I would have saved the link to where I read all this, but I cant find it ugh!

  • ShadowNickShadowNick Posts: 429
    Add a ton of rub before the meat, that is what builds your bark.  I'm of the school of that than when i coat ribs or butt, shouldn't even be able to see the meat through the rub at first till it starts drawing out a little moisture and turning into a paste.  As far as spraying liquid during the cook, everybody does it differently, but what works for me for ribs or pork butt, is once they are on the egg, the lid never gets opened again until they are done, not for spraying or foiling, and I have always had wonderfully moist food.  Again, everyone has different opinions though, and I typically do not do turbo cooks, so take the above advice with a grain of salt if you do turbo.
    Chicago, Illinois
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,747
    edited May 2013
    *gently sprinkle* 
    My technique is to add enough rub to make the meat unrecognizable, and I use food prep gloves, and "rub" it in. 
    I also try to leave the dome as closed as long as possible, NO PEEKING! 

    Some will foil ribs, add some liquid, then cook more to make fall off the bone ribs. I stopped doing this, and the family is starting to appreciate pull off the bone ribs. 
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,176

    Don't know about adding rub during the cook but if you are looking for "fall off the bone" ribs then foiling is the way to get there.  I'm in the camp of let the BGE do it's magic so once the prep work is complete and food on-I leave the dome shut. 

    With regard to the rub-you may want to cook a couple of rib racks side-by-side and do a taste test.  Experiment and find a method that works for you as there are about as many ways to get there as BGE owners.  FWIW-

    Louisville
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    This is my own opinion.  Most rub recipes i find are too hot for MY family.  Originally, i started making rubs, one after the other, and after using them, my family kind of like the taste of the food, but rejected the heat in the rub???  So i started using less and less rub, but still had a problem with the rub.  Now i have found some store bought rubs that are mild, and not objectionable to the family.  I read about certain rubs that many here post about, but am hesitent to order them on line for fear of them being too hot????
  • GreenhawKGreenhawK Posts: 387
    For a while now I have been spraying butts and ribs with spray olive oil (PAM) before putting on the rub.  This makes a nice paste that sticks on the meat with none falling off.  This has worked really well for me, and makes a nice crust with less wasting rub.
    Large BGE

    Decatur, AL
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 25,575
    The spraying thing is for webers and stickburners IMHO. The spray washes off the rub and the additional rub is to make up for it. The egg keeps a lot of moisture in so no need to make up for it.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390
    LS - did anyone ever tell you that you are just brilliant?
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 25,575
    Well you always say that but I sort of expect it from you. :x

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • cookinfuncookinfun Posts: 129
    I just dry rub at / before start of cook.  During cook, and during foil I use spray of apple cider vinegar and apple juice (50/50).  Never even added mop sauce until after coon (sugar mops/sauces tend to burn, changing taste).  Never did add more rub during cook...so cant say as to benefit.
    (2) LBGEs,  WSM, Vidalia Grill (gasser), Tailgater Grill (gasser)
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,393
    the benefit would be to bring back the flavor of the rub that was lost during the cook, some spice and herbs loose flavor during the long cook as they heat up. you really notice this with pulled pork and some wil add the rub while pulling, i add mine in a vinegar sauce mixed with a little bbq sauce and add it lightly to the pull before serving and have the regular sauce for those that want it added later.
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 5,684
    If (and that's a big IF) I foil my ribs, I like to add a bit more rub after they come out of the foil. Might be just something in my mind, but I find the flavor of the rub gets lost after the braise in the foil. Other than that, I don't recall ever reseasoning with rub after I've started cooking. Sometimes I'll mix the rub in with bbq sauce or when I pull my pork.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

     

  • SmokinDAWG82SmokinDAWG82 Posts: 1,701
    Rub before cooking (24 hours) I don't foil in the Egg, I did on my WSM but no need on Egg.
    I don't add rub during the cook
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,009
    I've noticed what fishlessman mentions. Some flavors fade away. What I notice decreasing the most is black pepper. Paprika can turn bitter. Garlic and onion change flavor w. cooking. I also prefer a dry rib to a sauced one. But I do like a sweet and crusty coating on ribs. So I often do a "finishing" rub in the last 45 minutes or so. A light mop of vinegar and onion juice, followed by coarse sugar, fresh black pepper, some paprika, bits of fresh garlic.

    Brisket, no. Just lots of pepper to start with.

    PP. No, but I do add extra rub to the pullings if the bark isn't enough to my taste.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,393
    edited May 2013
    gdenby said:
    I've noticed what fishlessman mentions. Some flavors fade away. What I notice decreasing the most is black pepper. Paprika can turn bitter. Garlic and onion change flavor w. cooking. I also prefer a dry rib to a sauced one. But I do like a sweet and crusty coating on ribs. So I often do a "finishing" rub in the last 45 minutes or so. A light mop of vinegar and onion juice, followed by coarse sugar, fresh black pepper, some paprika, bits of fresh garlic.



    Brisket, no. Just lots of pepper to start with.

    PP. No, but I do add extra rub to the pullings if the bark isn't enough to my taste.
    i notice it the most with spicey rubs on a low and slow pork butt, what was a good rub going in can taste like salt and cayenne after the cook, probably would be good to have some dizzy salt free for a final rub towards the end of the cook to bring out those lost flavors. natureboy should advertize that, sell them as a finishing rub
  • cookinfuncookinfun Posts: 129
    mmmm...not a bad idea, think i'll try.
    (2) LBGEs,  WSM, Vidalia Grill (gasser), Tailgater Grill (gasser)
  • egzillaegzilla Posts: 37

    My method, that I have had great success with both butt and ribs is

    The night before, rub in a layer of either John Henrys Texas Pecan Rub or Grub Rub. Then rub in a layer of yellow mustard then another layer of dry rub, wrap in celophane and put in the fridge over night. Before cooking I add another layer of dry rub.

  • MrCookingNurseMrCookingNurse Posts: 3,615
    in case you wanted another opinion and option,  I do not add any rub during a cook to ribs I don't feel like it would "cook" and mess up the bark that is being made.

    I do ribs rubbed not too thick but liberally at least one hour before they hit the egg.  

    I do foil for 45 min to 1 hour with butter, apple juice, and (brown sugar (when I want sweet ribs)) and then un foil, back on to baste a sauce on it 


    _______________________________________________

    LBGE & SBGE (big momma and pat)
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