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A trick to build flavor on your steaks...

HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
edited April 2013 in EggHead Forum
Just for a change of pace... Try this. When preparing your steaks for the grill take them out of the refer 1/2 hour before you want to grill them and... Don't put salt and pepper on them. Don't freak out now this could be good. At your grocer you will find bouillon cubes offered by Knorr. It's condensed beef flavoring that comes in very small cubes. Unwrap 1 cube and put it in a small bowl and add a teaspoon of olive oil to make a paste out of it. Rub the paste on your steaks and let them sit for the half hour cooling/warming time. It is a flavor extravaganza and it helps build a really nice rich crust on your steak that salt and pepper can't give you. Try it... You might like it.

Comments

  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    edited April 2013
    No... I don't work for Knorr. I found that on a Yahoo video by the guy that was Gordon Ramsay's mentor. Gordon Ramsay was his sous chef when he was making a name for himself. He has many famous chef's that were his sous chef early in their career. This guy is a big hitter in the culinary arts. I tried it... I liked it and want to pass it along to my fellow Egger's... Enjoy!
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    Thanks for the tip , I will try it. Normally, I use Kikoman Tariyaki marinade on my steaks.
  • +1 on the teriaki. Wilma can't do MSG and the little cubes are chock-full of that stuff.

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,113
    I've done something similar on beef roasts, but haven't tried it on steaks, yet. I mix 1 Tbl of Better than Bouillon Beef Base with 1 Tbl of worcestershire sauce and rub all over my beef roasts. It really adds a nice additional flavor profile.
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,747
    edited April 2013
    I've done something similar to roasted potatoes to kick up the flavor, but it didn't really matter the brand. 

    c

    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • QDudeQDude Posts: 472
    Do you think this concoction would work on brisket?

    A northern Colorado Egghead since 2012!

    XL and a Small BGE.

  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    edited April 2013
    QDude said:
    Do you think this concoction would work on brisket?

    Yes... Anytime you add an element to a cook you're trying to add flavor. Plus the oil over direct heat will help build a crust. Have at it.
  • JscottJscott Posts: 174
    this is interesting. Is there a way to do this without the MSG concentration?
  • HogHeaven said:


    QDude said:

    Do you think this concoction would work on brisket?



    Yes... Anytime you add an element to a cook you're trying to add flavor. Plus the oil over direct heat will help build a crust. Have at it.

    Love all the input and the ideas (keep em coming) but i have a different take on olive oil than some.

    As far as olive oil on steaks go- the smoke point of olive oil is 300-400 depending on type. The better stuff (extra virgin) actually has a lower smoke point. If you cook over the smoke point of your oil, your steaks are going to taste like burnt oil. Put a little oil in a sauce pan and let it smoke and see if that is a flavor you want on your steak before firing up the egg for a reverse sear or something hot like that. If you like caramelized steaks, leave the oil off of them.

    And do not ever use oil on Briskets if you are doing bbq/low and slow. It totally ruins the bark because it does not cook off at low and slow temps as can leave it mushy. If you feel you need a binder for brisket (you don't but some people prefer to use one) use something water based like mustard or worchestishire to hold on whatever seasoning you want. That will evaporate during to cook giving you the nice firm bark you are looking for without affecting the flavor.

    I would recommend the same for steaks. If you feel you need a binder (again, you don't. You can get plenty of anything to stick just by rubbing it in a little) use something water based that will evaporate without scorching on a hot cook.


  • BeaumontyBeaumonty Posts: 159
    I agree with Cen-tex on the steaks, I definitely can't speak to the brisket.  

    I use olive oil to marinate my steaks.  After reading some articles on steak grilling, I learned about the problem of too much moisture on your steak at the initial seer.  Essentially you are going to do one of two things that interfere with the carmelization that occurs at the sear: the water-based marinate dripping off the steak will evaporate and "steam" the meat first or the oil-based marinade will flash and burn.

    I have started patting my oil-marinated steaks dry with paper towels and it has made a huge difference.  I will, therefore, follow your method with a tiny tweak: I will pat it dry before grilling.  You'll remove some of the bouillon, but i think your carmelized layer will be better for it.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,170
    edited April 2013
    Jscott said:
    this is interesting. Is there a way to do this without the MSG concentration?
    Its be awhile since I perused Escoffier, someone whom Micheal Pierre White , Knorr's spokesperson, would know much better than I. But the old French method would be to paint the steak w. a demi-glaze at the end. Think super concentrated stock mixed w. roux. Very high concentrations of Maillard flavors, but also the glutamate that would have been in the stock's celery. Some people claim that natural glutamates don't cause the same problem as the refined mono-sodium glutamate. I haven't found anything so far that could explain why. Still, natural glutamate boosters have been used for a long time.

    Possibly could smear the steak w. demi-glace before cooking.

    There are some pretty good commercial demi-glaces. You might look into those, but they are pretty expensive compared to the Knorr cubes. I tried making some from scratch once. Major pain compared to just making a good stock.

    There is also an American product called Char-Crust that builds flavor and a crust. It also has processed glutamate extractions. But it does have wheat protein and dextrose to help build a crust. I've tried it a few times, and was not very impressed w. the results. My mother used to make crusted chops and steaks, but she didn't bother to pass the info to me, a boy. Her's were lots better than Char-crust. So I'm pretty sure there must be a way to both boost the flavor and produce a crust w. pretty common ingredients. But, I haven't hit on it.
  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    Jscott said:
    this is interesting. Is there a way to do this without the MSG concentration?

    I don't think so. I have the little box in front if me now and it does have monosodium glutamate in the list of content. If you have a resistance to MSG I wouldn't recommend trying it.
  • BeaumontyBeaumonty Posts: 159
    I've heard of the demi-glace method.  I believe they referred to it as "steak butter" and you store reduced meat stock in ice cube trays.  sounded complex.  

    I too heard it was applied after cooking. Have you tried the commercial versions?  I've seen them at Williams-Sonoma and Sur La Table.  I may have to give it a whirl if it's a secret flavor booster, but i would want the ones with the celery-based glutamate.
  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    edited April 2013
    QDude said:
    Do you think this concoction would work on brisket?

    Yes... Anytime you add an element to a cook you're trying to add flavor. Plus the oil over direct heat will help build a crust. Have at it.
    Love all the input and the ideas (keep em coming) but i have a different take on olive oil than some. As far as olive oil on steaks go- the smoke point of olive oil is 300-400 depending on type. The better stuff (extra virgin) actually has a lower smoke point. If you cook over the smoke point of your oil, your steaks are going to taste like burnt oil. Put a little oil in a sauce pan and let it smoke and see if that is a flavor you want on your steak before firing up the egg for a reverse sear or something hot like that. If you like caramelized steaks, leave the oil off of them. And do not ever use oil on Briskets if you are doing bbq/low and slow. It totally ruins the bark because it does not cook off at low and slow temps as can leave it mushy. If you feel you need a binder for brisket (you don't but some people prefer to use one) use something water based like mustard or worchestishire to hold on whatever seasoning you want. That will evaporate during to cook giving you the nice firm bark you are looking for without affecting the flavor. I would recommend the same for steaks. If you feel you need a binder (again, you don't. You can get plenty of anything to stick just by rubbing it in a little) use something water based that will evaporate without scorching on a hot cook.

    I just use a half a teaspoon of olive oil to break down the bouillon cube to make a paste out of it. I quit using olive oil or peanut oil on my steaks when I found the beef love idea on Amazingribs.com. Beef fat rendered down to a liquid form will take more heat than all of them. Painting beef love on your meat just before putting it on the high heat for the final sear helps you get that deep dark brown mahogany color i like. I agree not to use oil on a brisket when cooking low and slow. I should have thought that true better.
  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    edited April 2013
    Beaumonty said:
    I agree with Cen-tex on the steaks, I definitely can't speak to the brisket.  

    I use olive oil to marinate my steaks.  After reading some articles on steak grilling, I learned about the problem of too much moisture on your steak at the initial seer.  Essentially you are going to do one of two things that interfere with the carmelization that occurs at the sear: the water-based marinate dripping off the steak will evaporate and "steam" the meat first or the oil-based marinade will flash and burn.

    I have started patting my oil-marinated steaks dry with paper towels and it has made a huge difference.  I will, therefore, follow your method with a tiny tweak: I will pat it dry before grilling.  You'll remove some of the bouillon, but i think your carmelized layer will be better for it.

    I agree on your concern about both the burn point of oil and not steaming your meat at the final sear. I posted to use 1 teaspoon to break the cube into a paste. 1 cube will season 2 steaks liberally. That means each steak will have less than a half of a teaspoon of olive oil on it. I personally start my steak cook on my LBGE with my 18" grid on top of the fire ring with no platesetter. I cook at 300 degrees until the meat gets to 110/115 degrees. At this temp the meat will not brown much at all that far away from the direct heat. Then if you've seen some of my other postings regarding the reverse sear... I have stated that when I take the meat off and place it on a plate, while I remove my big grid from the fire ring level, open my bottom vent wide open to ramp up the heat. I recommend using that setup change time to blot your meat with a paper towel to remove the water that has been rindered in the first part of the cook, so as to not steam your meat.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,170
    Beaumonty said:
    I've heard of the demi-glace method.  I believe they referred to it as "steak butter" and you store reduced meat stock in ice cube trays.  sounded complex.  

    I too heard it was applied after cooking. Have you tried the commercial versions?  I've seen them at Williams-Sonoma and Sur La Table.  I may have to give it a whirl if it's a secret flavor booster, but i would want the ones with the celery-based glutamate.
    I've stored cubes of various flavored butters in cube trays. Likewise, roux. My best stocks just go into jars stored in the fridge. My one attempt at demi-glace was just used when done, but I suppose it could have been frozen and stored as above.

    From scratch, its not exactly complex, assuming knowledge of roux and stock making, just elaborate and time consuming. For me, too many steps where I don't quite know what I'm doing, and way too many times where distractions will ruin the results.

    AFAIK, all classic demi-glace included a stock based w. the standard mirepoix  that had celery in it. And thus concentrated glutamates.  I would suppose any good commercial prep would follow the traditional ingredients.

    I've used a brand called Demi-glace Gold. Does use standard mirepoix. They are available in beef, goose, veal and several other flavors. Dynamite stuff. Super concentrated. I've just used them to boost sauces/gravies, not diluted for a glaze. I'm sure they would work, but I suspect a light touch would be necessary
  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    edited April 2013
    Beaumonty said:
    I've heard of the demi-glace method.  I believe they referred to it as "steak butter" and you store reduced meat stock in ice cube trays.  sounded complex.  

    I too heard it was applied after cooking. Have you tried the commercial versions?  I've seen them at Williams-Sonoma and Sur La Table.  I may have to give it a whirl if it's a secret flavor booster, but i would want the ones with the celery-based glutamate.

    First of all and foremost in my posting... I do not claim to be a trained Chef. I'm a backyard griller that spends more time than the average joe studying new ideas and tricks to prepare better tasyting BBQ for my friends and family. With that said the steak butter that you mention I think is more commonly referred to as compound butter. That is a process where you bring a stick of butter to room temperature, mix in other herbs and spices and then lay a layer of cling wrap down on your counter and form it into a log. Refrigerate it for a while and then when your steaks come off the grill you slice off a piece and put it on top of the steak during the resting period to add a layer of flavor. That is much different than the beef love I render down to a liquid form and pour into a ice cube tray. I use beef love only on the reverse sear. After i've blotted my meat with a paper towel to remove the water that has been rendered on the first part of the cook, right before I put it back on the fire 2" from the red hot lump, I paint on my beef love. This I learned on the Amazingribs.com website. Meathead the guy that owns that site used to be a professor at the Cordon Bleu school of cooking. He is a very accomplished Chef and is well known in the culinary field. He interviewed a very famous Chef that runs a famous Steakhouse in Chicago and that Chef taught him about the beef love trick that he felt helped make his restaurant famous. Meathead wrote about it and put it on his website... For all of us to use. I like it and it makes my steaks taste better and it helps brown them to that deep brown mahogany color, like the really good Steakhouse's do. I like to pass on what I have learned to other Egger's and I like learning their ideas too.
  • ShiffShiff Posts: 1,052
    Jscott said:
    this is interesting. Is there a way to do this without the MSG concentration?
    Certainly.  Knorr bouillon's first ingredient is salt (1100+ mg sodium in 1/2 cube, 2200+ mg in a whole cube)  plus it also contains MSG.  Check the organic section of a good grocer for bouillon. The one we use is called "Better that Bouillon (reduced sodium)" and it's first ingredient is roasted beef and natural juices.  It does have salt (350 mg sodium in a serving (equivalent to a whole bouillon cube)).  Contains no MSG but does have celery,garlic,onion, etc.

    This product makes a great stock or Au Jus.

    There are probably other similar brands in the organic section.
    Barry Lancaster, PA
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,049
    gdenby said:
    Beaumonty said:
    I've heard of the demi-glace method.  I believe they referred to it as "steak butter" and you store reduced meat stock in ice cube trays.  sounded complex.  

    I too heard it was applied after cooking. Have you tried the commercial versions?  I've seen them at Williams-Sonoma and Sur La Table.  I may have to give it a whirl if it's a secret flavor booster, but i would want the ones with the celery-based glutamate.
    I've stored cubes of various flavored butters in cube trays. Likewise, roux. My best stocks just go into jars stored in the fridge. My one attempt at demi-glace was just used when done, but I suppose it could have been frozen and stored as above.

    From scratch, its not exactly complex, assuming knowledge of roux and stock making, just elaborate and time consuming. For me, too many steps where I don't quite know what I'm doing, and way too many times where distractions will ruin the results.

    AFAIK, all classic demi-glace included a stock based w. the standard mirepoix  that had celery in it. And thus concentrated glutamates.  I would suppose any good commercial prep would follow the traditional ingredients.

    I've used a brand called Demi-glace Gold. Does use standard mirepoix. They are available in beef, goose, veal and several other flavors. Dynamite stuff. Super concentrated. I've just used them to boost sauces/gravies, not diluted for a glaze. I'm sure they would work, but I suspect a light touch would be necessary
    It's really hard to beat a homemade stock or demi glace. Ths salt as a preservative being the main issue. I have an Italian butcher close by that will give me as many veal bones as I want (they actually throw them out) and making the stock and them the demi glace is a long process but very enjoyable for me at least.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • BeaumontyBeaumonty Posts: 159
    HogHeaven said:
    Beaumonty said:
    I've heard of the demi-glace method.  I believe they referred to it as "steak butter" and you store reduced meat stock in ice cube trays.  sounded complex.  

    I too heard it was applied after cooking. Have you tried the commercial versions?  I've seen them at Williams-Sonoma and Sur La Table.  I may have to give it a whirl if it's a secret flavor booster, but i would want the ones with the celery-based glutamate.

    First of all and foremost in my posting... I do not claim to be a trained Chef. I'm a backyard griller that spends more time than the average joe studying new ideas and tricks to prepare better tasyting BBQ for my friends and family. With that said the steak butter that you mention I think is more commonly referred to as compound butter. That is a process where you bring a stick of butter to room temperature, mix in other herbs and spices and then lay a layer of cling wrap down on your counter and form it into a log. Refrigerate it for a while and then when your steaks come off the grill you slice off a piece and put it on top of the steak during the resting period to add a layer of flavor. That is much different than the beef love I render down to a liquid form and pour into a ice cube tray. I use beef love only on the reverse sear. After i've blotted my meat with a paper towel to remove the water that has been rendered on the first part of the cook, right before I put it back on the fire 2" from the red hot lump, I paint on my beef love. This I learned on the Amazingribs.com website. Meathead the guy that owns that site used to be a professor at the Cordon Bleu school of cooking. He is a very accomplished Chef and is well known in the culinary field. He interviewed a very famous Chef that runs a famous Steakhouse in Chicago and that Chef taught him about the beef love trick that he felt helped make his restaurant famous. Meathead wrote about it and put it on his website... For all of us to use. I like it and it makes my steaks taste better and it helps brown them to that deep brown mahogany color, like the really good Steakhouse's do. I like to pass on what I have learned to other Egger's and I like learning their ideas too.
    I think you are right.  I got my terms mixed up.  I was referring to beef love.  now, are you saying that you'll paint it with the bouillon/oil paste or literally with the beef love?  I think I am going to try this method next.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,170
    I like to pass on what I have learned to other Egger's and I like learning their ideas too.
    And thank you for that. Every tip and trick makes the job so much easier, and the meal more like a celebration. I'm not trained either, just love it when I can plop some food down that drops jaws open from the aroma. Happy to learn anything that makes that easier.


  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    Beaumonty said:
    HogHeaven said:
    Beaumonty said:
    I've heard of the demi-glace method.  I believe they referred to it as "steak butter" and you store reduced meat stock in ice cube trays.  sounded complex.  

    I too heard it was applied after cooking. Have you tried the commercial versions?  I've seen them at Williams-Sonoma and Sur La Table.  I may have to give it a whirl if it's a secret flavor booster, but i would want the ones with the celery-based glutamate.

    First of all and foremost in my posting... I do not claim to be a trained Chef. I'm a backyard griller that spends more time than the average joe studying new ideas and tricks to prepare better tasyting BBQ for my friends and family. With that said the steak butter that you mention I think is more commonly referred to as compound butter. That is a process where you bring a stick of butter to room temperature, mix in other herbs and spices and then lay a layer of cling wrap down on your counter and form it into a log. Refrigerate it for a while and then when your steaks come off the grill you slice off a piece and put it on top of the steak during the resting period to add a layer of flavor. That is much different than the beef love I render down to a liquid form and pour into a ice cube tray. I use beef love only on the reverse sear. After i've blotted my meat with a paper towel to remove the water that has been rendered on the first part of the cook, right before I put it back on the fire 2" from the red hot lump, I paint on my beef love. This I learned on the Amazingribs.com website. Meathead the guy that owns that site used to be a professor at the Cordon Bleu school of cooking. He is a very accomplished Chef and is well known in the culinary field. He interviewed a very famous Chef that runs a famous Steakhouse in Chicago and that Chef taught him about the beef love trick that he felt helped make his restaurant famous. Meathead wrote about it and put it on his website... For all of us to use. I like it and it makes my steaks taste better and it helps brown them to that deep brown mahogany color, like the really good Steakhouse's do. I like to pass on what I have learned to other Egger's and I like learning their ideas too.
    I think you are right.  I got my terms mixed up.  I was referring to beef love.  now, are you saying that you'll paint it with the bouillon/oil paste or literally with the beef love?  I think I am going to try this method next.

    The beef bouillon paste goes on before the cook. I don't paint that on. With my fingers I take some of the paste and rub it into the meat. I let it sit while the meat is coming to room temp. Beef love I paint on after the first part of the cook, right before I put it down on the fire for the final searing process.
  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 243
    gdenby said:
    I like to pass on what I have learned to other Egger's and I like learning their ideas too.
    And thank you for that. Every tip and trick makes the job so much easier, and the meal more like a celebration. I'm not trained either, just love it when I can plop some food down that drops jaws open from the aroma. Happy to learn anything that makes that easier.



    I like using allspice.com for searching for recipes too. I find that the cooking temps and times that they recommend for the indoor ovens work on the BGE too. This is my favorite recent find. VI tried it after I posted it and loved it. http://allrecipes.com/recipe/grilled-mongolian-pork-chops/detail.aspx
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