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"Fat cap" on butt (pics)

I'm just opened the 2 butts I am putting on the egg for an overnight cook and they have a pretty thick fat cap, would you trim some of this off?
LBGE, Twin Eagle 36" grill to hold my EGGcessories
image.jpg 212.4K
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Comments

  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 2,902
    I would trim to about 1/8 or 1/4. Really no reason but that's what I do when I get one with a lot of fat. Had one last week with probably 3/4".

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     LBGE,SBGE, and a mini makes three......Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

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  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,748
    I don't. It will get mixed in when you pull it.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
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  • TUTTLE871TUTTLE871 Posts: 1,316
    Did 4 yesterday and left the fat on, people seemed to like it when you chop up all the pork with the fat for Sammy's.

    "Hold my beer and watch this S##T!"

    LARGE BGE DALLAS TX.

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  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    I cook it turbo style and pull the fat off just before pulling the pork -  it adds to the juices as the butt cooks and is easily disposed of after words.
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,091
    There is a lot of fat on the inside. I get mine trimmed right down

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • PhiliciousPhilicious Posts: 312
    I just trimmed the fat cap off of 4 small butts that I am smoking tomorrow. I figure there is enough fat on the inside and it gives me close to 1/4 more edible bark.
    Born and raised in NOLA. Now live in East TN.
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  • PhiliciousPhilicious Posts: 312
    See
    image.jpg 2.4M
    Born and raised in NOLA. Now live in East TN.
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  • YEMTreyYEMTrey Posts: 2,120
    I put it on the grid fat cap down. In the past, the pork butt has lifted from the grill and left the entire fat cap behind.
    XL BGE and Mini Max in Cincinnati, Ohio
    "REMEMBER DUANE ALLMAN"
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  • I have a 7 lb bone in shoulder I am planning to cook for pull pork tomorrow. Using bad Byrons BR over mustard. Cook plan was slow start, turbo through stall. Should I apply late tonight or in the am 1 hour before putting on the egg?
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  • I apply just prior to putting in on the smoker. Have done it both ways with no difference.
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  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 2,902
    I use olive oil and rub the night B4.

    ___________________________________

     

     LBGE,SBGE, and a mini makes three......Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

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  • @PlanoPokes79 is that your envelope? Looks like we share 2 common interests?
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,091
    The salt in the BB is gonna draw out a lot of the water. The water will cook off during the cook anyway. You might get a little more smoke flavour going overnight but that is all I can see

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • My thought on fat caps is either trim them down or off before the cook, or leave them on after. Once the bark forms, I'm eating it. That is where all the flavor is on butts and briskets. So....if you don't like fat, trim it first. If you dont mind it, rub it down, let the bark form over it and mix it in after the cook. It's delicious

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  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 12,328
    edited April 2013
    shtgunal3 said:
    I use olive oil and rub the night B4.Parenthetically speaking, If you aren't getting the bark you like this way (not saying you aren't but I've seen it happen a lot with oils) and you feel like you need to use a binder ( idon't use anything), use something water based like mustard or worchesteshire. Oils can inhibit bark formation (damn that sounds technical).  

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  • GA_DawgsGA_Dawgs Posts: 273
    I agree with cen-tex on oil rub. I would trim it down a little next time to make sure you get a good bark without too much fat under it. Just my preference.
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  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 10,514
    I rub 3 times. Night before, 2 hours before, right before it hits the grid. I get a thick bark, but it isn't necessary.
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  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 10,514
    No binder BTW. The rub draws moisture out and dissolves allowing more to stick.
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  • I rub 3 times. Night before, 2 hours before, right before it hits the grid. I get a thick bark, but it isn't necessary.
    wow. That is a lot of rub. Like seriously a lot of rub

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  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 10,514
    I go lighter on each coat than I would on a single coat. Gives different layers of flavor and I can mix rubs.
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  • I go lighter on each coat than I would on a single coat. Gives different layers of flavor and I can mix rubs.

    Ok.

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  • @PlanoPokes79 is that your envelope? Looks like we share 2 common interests?

    No, my Cameron V90 died a few yrs ago and just haven't had a new one built yet. This is a friends I have been flyn. Too much fun!
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  • tnbarbqtnbarbq Posts: 248
    I would leave it on and trim it before pulling after it's done.
    Scooter 
    Mid TN. Hangin' in the 'Boro. MIM Judge
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  • Crispix49Crispix49 Posts: 190
    I usually don't trim it, and then the fat cap will peel right off after cooking as I am about to start pulling.  The downside is you loose the potential for more bark that way. 
    Atlanta suburbs
    Large & Mini owner
    UGA Alum - Go Dawgs!
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  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 264
    edited April 2013
    I trim my butts... Mainly because I want the "Beef Love" to use when I cook steaks. I learned this on Amazingribs.com. Meathead, the guy that owns and operates that website interviewed the chef at a famous Steakhouse that used beef love on all of the steaks he was famous for. To make beef love is simple. Just save all of the fat you trim off your butts or any other meat you are cooking and save it. When you have a pound or 2 render it down in a sauce pan until it becomes liquid. Throw away the solids that won't melt down. Then when it cools... Pour it into a ice cube tray and make cubes out of it. Put the cubes in a freezer bag and freeze them until you need them. When and how to use it... I always do the reverse sear technic on my steaks. I start the cook as direct heat with no platesetter. Before the cook I put my 13 1/2" grill extender right on top of my fire box and then I put my regular grid on top of my fire ring. I start the cook with the meat on the upper grid with a cooking level temp of 300 degrees. I leave the lid down until the meat gets to 90 degrees. I lift the lid and turn the meat, close the lid and cook until the meat gets to 115 degrees. Then I lift the lid and take the steaks off and place them on a plate while I take off my regular grid so I can get the meat down low on my grill extender grid that is 2" from the now very hot lump. I leave the lid open for the rest of the cook and I have the bottom vent wide open. Then while I have the meat off I blot it with a paper towel so as to remove the water that has rendered during the cook so far. We want to sear the met not steam it. Then... I paint one side of the meat with Beef Love. I put that side down on the grid and let it sizzle for about 3 or 4 minutes. I want it to get that deep dark brown mahogany color like you get at those real expensive Steakhouse's. Before I turn the meat I paint the other side with beef love then I turn it and cook it until the meat gets to 135 degrees. Done! Your steaks will be that beautiful dark mahogany color on the outside and the interior will be pink bumper to bumper. The chef that taught Meathead this trick said that rendered fat is much tastier than olive oil and it allows the meat to sear better. Bottom line my friends... Don't throw your trimmings away. Make it into Beef Love!
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  • milesbrown4milesbrown4 Posts: 314
    @HogHeaven that should be a post by itself!  Great breakdown.

    As for the fat cap, I agree, I mix it in when I pull the pork.  It keeps it moist when you shred it.

    I also cook with fat cap on top, so it moisturizes the meat throughout, if not the fat gets cooked off. I don't want that I want to keep it!  

    Great post!
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  • Yes, @HogHeaven, it's a great read. Now that I've seen it in the last 6 posts I've opened I almost have it memorized!  ;)
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
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  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,851
    I rub 3 times. Night before, 2 hours before, right before it hits the grid. I get a thick bark, but it isn't necessary.
    wow. That is a lot of rub. Like seriously a lot of rub
    he must be a teenager.
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
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