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We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Drip Pan; Dry or Wet?

I know it's not needed due to the ceramic cooking properties maintaining moisture but is there any benefit to having a wet drip pan (water/flavoring mixture)?  Thanks!

Mark

Comments

  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,747
    edited April 2013
    For me water yes, flavoring liquid.... No.
    Water will help keep the brippings from burning on the bottom of the pan. I also like to raise it with balls of foil, washers, feet, etc.... to prevent burn smell.

    I never understood flavoring liquids in the drip pan, unless you wanted to make a gravy. If anything the water evaporates, and you are reducing the liquid in the drip pan for more concentrated flavor.


    .02
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,690
    As you note, not needed but it depends on what you are cooking and whether you plan to use the drippings for something else.  As long as you have the air gap with the drip pan so the drippings don't burn it then becomes a matter of choice.  If you do use a water or flavor mixture then you have a heat sink just below your cooking surface as long as there is liquid in the pan.  Many use various liquids for flavoring enhancement(?) during low&slows but I have not really been able to tell any differences.  Could be the level of smoke or quantity of supervisory adult beverages have masked the effect  :)  FWIW-
    Louisville
  • sariverssarivers Posts: 67
    I've tried both ways but for me I like the drip pan with 1 layer of tin foil and no liquid.  After the cook I ball up the tin foil and throw it in the trash and have a clean drip pan.  It doesn't matter if the drippings burn or not.  
    Columbia, SC

  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,747
    sarivers said:
      It doesn't matter if the drippings burn or not.  
    For me the burnt drippings were giving an off flavor. Totally agree on lining with foil for easy clean-up.
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • Hello All, 
    I had an idea along these lines that I've been wanting to try but have not yet.

    What if I put something inert, like clean sand, in the drip pan rather than water or foil?

    I've done foil, and it does a pretty good job of keeping the drip pan clean, but the pan I have is too big for one piece of foil and the rendered fat runs between the two sheets. I've tried water, but I use a pretty sugary rub and the drippings end up burning and sticking anyway. I'm thinking with clean sand I could catch the dripping, prevent the burning and just toss all the mess out at the end. 

    Anyone ever tried something like this? 

    Cheers -
    B_B 
    Badger at heart, living in SoCal

    Carlsbad, CA
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    I used to have a pan with water  --  went thru three pans --  now i just use a layer of thin foil across the PS and turn  up each side to catch the drippings --  i am a believer in the flavors of the burning drippings!  I pull my grill off the egg at the end of the cook and use the tongs to ball up the foil and dispose of it.. PS stays nice and clean..
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,672

    I use Heavy Duty foil (18") over my 16" drip pan, works perfect.  Many people claim that the burnt drippings give off a smell but will not add any bad flavor to the meat -- and I'm on board with that. I haven't done any studies, but I've done it both ways over the years (with and without water) and I've never had a bad tasting meat from a dry pan.  Any it's a lot easier that way so I'm going with it.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,531
    I have used a drip pan with wine and herbs and stuff like that in it.  You can definitely smell the aromatics coming out of the egg, and I thought I could taste a hint of it in the meat.  Not sure it is exactly worth the trouble...I wouldn't waste good wine ;).   


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,049
    Hello All, 
    I had an idea along these lines that I've been wanting to try but have not yet.

    What if I put something inert, like clean sand, in the drip pan rather than water or foil?

    I've done foil, and it does a pretty good job of keeping the drip pan clean, but the pan I have is too big for one piece of foil and the rendered fat runs between the two sheets. I've tried water, but I use a pretty sugary rub and the drippings end up burning and sticking anyway. I'm thinking with clean sand I could catch the dripping, prevent the burning and just toss all the mess out at the end. 

    Anyone ever tried something like this? 

    Cheers -
    B_B 
    Yes you can. If you use an inch of sand you don't need the platesetter either

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,343
    edited April 2013
    Only time I use liquid is for Italian beef. Don't want a crust on the meat so the broth keeps the meat moist and it sort of steams it. I do the whole works at the felt line, 350, so the liquid never boils off. 
    IMGP2459.jpg
    4288 x 2848 - 1M
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • I use the sand as well. Works great!
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