Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
It’s almost Halloween and if you’re cooking on your EGG, you may end up with more people knocking on your door asking for pork chops than candy! In case you’re willing to share and want to please a crowd, we recommend warm Margherita Pizza, FGL’s Lemon Pepper Wings or our favorite, S’mores in a Cone!


If you missed the 17th Annual EGGtoberfest here are the highlights Click Here Fall is upon us, and it's a great time for getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Question About Reducing The Smoke Flavor

Is there any method to reducing the amount of smoke flavor in what I am cooking? I have used the Egg wood and the Cowboy brand with about the same results.

I know cooking time will effect the amount of smoke in the meat, ect. Any additional thoughts will help.

 

Thanks in advance:  Egger 007

Comments

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,877
    Higher temps. 
    A low and slow smouldering fire seems to have more intense smoke than a higher temp grilling fire. Just my guess, but anything over 400 has a lot less smoke from the lump than a 300 fire. 

    That's why I like a reverse sear on steaks, the steak picks up some smoke before I sear it. Not for everyone.  
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,768
    If you are adding smoking wood, add less, if you are just using the lump, make sure you wait out the white smoke, until you get to clear smoke. 

    It was said, if it smells good it will taste good.  

     
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,208
    If you are not using additional smoke wood but just the lump, then different brands of lump will contribute different levels of "smoke taste" to the cook.  I have found Wicked Good Weekend Warrior to be about the most "smoke neutral" of the lumps I have tried.  Beyond that-cooking over a wood fire will impart a taste that is part of the process and different from a gasser or briquets.  FWIW-
    Louisville
  • bvcbvc Posts: 36
    lousubcap said:
    If you are not using additional smoke wood but just the lump, then different brands of lump will contribute different levels of "smoke taste" to the cook.  I have found Wicked Good Weekend Warrior to be about the most "smoke neutral" of the lumps I have tried.  Beyond that-cooking over a wood fire will impart a taste that is part of the process and different from a gasser or briquets.  FWIW-

    Yep, this.  I find the wgww to not impart any smoke flavor.  So long as you are letting you are giving your lump the proper time to burn before you cook on it.

    Kenmore, WA
    Large and Small BGE
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 5,363
    @tazcrash put it most succinctly. A little wood can go a long way sometimes, depending on your palette. In my experience, hickory and mesquite have more prominent flavor than smoked woods. Start with 2 fist sized chunks for a rack of ribs or a pork butt and see how you like it. I usually use 3-4 fist sized chunks of  a fruit wood for a pork butt. And wait for thin blue smoke or a clean fire before you put your meat on. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,748
    I've never tried it but hear Ozark Oak burns clean.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    The first thing you need to think about is "what are you cooking"??  Certain meats and products absorb smoke more than others, like the difference between a beef roast or ground beef !  Chicken can be overcome by smoke tastes.  Also the size of the cut make a difference ! 
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,015
    are you waiting for the lump to burn cleanly, before the food goes on the grill you want to smell the smoke, if it smells good there wont be any bad flavors, if its smelling bad, you need to wait a little longer til its burning better. always smell the smoke before the food goes in
  • Try Wicked Good. If you can't find it in stores you can order it at wickedgoodcharcoal.com. I get three bags at a time delivered to my door.  Very mild smoke flavor allows you to control the amount of smoke with your own chunks/chips.  Its all I use.

     "Where the weak grow strong and the strong grow great, Here's to "Down Home," the Old North State!"

    Med & XL

  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 245
    Smoke is like salt... Use to much and your entended flavor enhancer makes your food almost uneatable. It really comes down to how much salt you sprinkle on or how much wood you put in to burn. Best to lean to slightly not enough smoke for most cooks. For ribs... I put in a big hunk about the size if my hand. When that quits smoking I don't add more. You get a slight smoke flavor but it is not overwhelming.
  • JMSetzlerJMSetzler Posts: 75
    Another method of reducing smoke is to leave the top vent completely open and use the bottom vent only to control your fire.  I do this when I'm cooking poultry to keep from getting too much smoke and it works pretty well.
  • You could also do a clean burn to get rid of the painted in smoke on the egg.  I have noticed that this has helped me to get rid of the mixture of smoke that i get occasionally.
Sign In or Register to comment.