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XL People - CGS SS Charcoal Ring

Plano_JJPlano_JJ Posts: 448
edited March 2013 in EggHead Forum
Ordered one of these and it arrived in time for me to use it yesterday. To put it simply, awesome product. This will save a ton of lump. I was concerned at first about how it would affect the heat in the XL. Not an issue at all. Basically you are using the same amount of lump in the XL that you would in the BGE Large. I did a high temp cook thursday on some beef fajitas and used the same lump on the blackened stuff last night and had plenty. Highly recommended. I will get some pics this evening when I put my pork loin on.

Comments

  • jccbone62jccbone62 Posts: 194
    I have the same product but noticed for indirect cooks I have to open the vents more to get the higher temperatures. Have you tried indirect cooks yet?
    XL owner in Wichita, KS
  • Plano_JJPlano_JJ Posts: 448
    jccbone62 said:
    I have the same product but noticed for indirect cooks I have to open the vents more to get the higher temperatures. Have you tried indirect cooks yet?
    Yes, today on some baby backs and it worked great. Not too much of a difference on the vents. Held 250 pretty easily.
  • BigGreenDonBigGreenDon Posts: 165
    Guys,

    I have this product and recommend the following process tweak:

    On the charcoal grate you will notice that the outside holes allow air to come up into the cooking chamber without going through the lump.  Block these with aluminum foil.

    The same is true for the holes in the side of the firebox.  Those holes allow air to come in that will not pass through the lump field.  Block those also with aluminum foil plugs.

    These measures should increase the fuel efficiency when the reducing ring is being used.  The bottom line is that you want the air from the inlet to be forced to go through the lump field and not around it.


  • Plano_JJPlano_JJ Posts: 448
    Guys,

    I have this product and recommend the following process tweak:

    On the charcoal grate you will notice that the outside holes allow air to come up into the cooking chamber without going through the lump.  Block these with aluminum foil.

    The same is true for the holes in the side of the firebox.  Those holes allow air to come in that will not pass through the lump field.  Block those also with aluminum foil plugs.

    These measures should increase the fuel efficiency when the reducing ring is being used.  The bottom line is that you want the air from the inlet to be forced to go through the lump field and not around it.


    I see what your saying but wouldn't the air that is coming in around the reducing ring still feed the fire even though it is not coming up strictly through the charcoal? I would think the more air the better. I am asking because I don't know.
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  • BigGreenDonBigGreenDon Posts: 165
    Plano_JJ said:
    I see what your saying but wouldn't the air that is coming in around the reducing ring still feed the fire even though it is not coming up strictly through the charcoal? I would think the more air the better. I am asking because I don't know.
    My take on this is that airflow in the egg is going to always tend to go upward.  If you are using the wire ring, then the outside holes on the grate may contribute to the fire, but if you are using the solid-wall reducer I don't think the air would go up 3 or 4 inches then back down to feed the fire.

    The air coming out of the side holes in the firebox would need to travel horizontally for a ways also in order to contribute, but the general upward flow of gases would tend to push them up before they got to the fire.

    This is all mind-experiment stuff that I cannot prove.  It would be easy for you (or others) to try this for yourself.  If you think it does not help, no need to do it again...

    Ever since the early days of cooking on my first XL, I've been extremely sensitive to airflow that bypasses the charcoal bed.  For a while, I could not get my XL up to pizza cooking temperatures.  I discovered that some air would come through the gap between the fire-ring and egg shell and bypass the fire.  After I put an aluminum foil gasket between the fire ring and shell, my ability to get higher temps improved markedly.

    I can only relate what works for me.  YMMV.  If you try it, it doesn't help, and you think I'm full of hooey -- I will not be offended if you tell me so!
  • Plano_JJPlano_JJ Posts: 448
    Nah man, thanks for the explanation. You have obviously researched this quite a bit. Think you could post some pics of your setup? I am one of the intellectually challenged ones that do better with pictures :-B
  • BigGreenDonBigGreenDon Posts: 165
    Plano_JJ said:
    Nah man, thanks for the explanation. You have obviously researched this quite a bit. Think you could post some pics of your setup? I am one of the intellectually challenged ones that do better with pictures :-B
    Next time I am set up with the reducer, I can do that...
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 4,274
    edited April 2013
    @BigGreenDon, interesting idea.  A while back someone on the other forum (GG?) posted about using crumpled foil 'rope' to seal the space between the fire box and outer shell, around the lower vent; this forces maximum air to enter below the grate instead of around the firebox.

    I found two nice rigid SS tube in my parts bin; each ring is 14.5" diameter and 9" deep; been thinking of cutting them into assortment of 3.5", 4", 5" deep rings to use as lump reducers in the XL, can also drill holes in them.

    Also, I want to experiment with the Large's fire ring as lump reducer in XL; likewise using Small's fire ring in Large. Should be interesting.
    Vaughan, ON
  • StL_MikeStL_Mike Posts: 3
    I've been considering a lump ring reducer and noticed that I see two styles, one made out of wire, and one made out of more of a solid ring.  I see them listed for the same price.  Is one better than the other, and why?  Thanks.
  • EggRacerEggRacer Posts: 400
    No idea which is better but I have the non-solid one and it works just great. I don't remember why I chose the one I did. Maybe I just mentally flipped a coin.
    XLBGE & LBGE
    North Richland Hills, TX
  • Ragtop99Ragtop99 Posts: 1,271
    Plano_JJ said:
    Ordered one of these and it arrived in time for me to use it yesterday. To put it simply, awesome product. This will save a ton of lump. I was concerned at first about how it would affect the heat in the XL. Not an issue at all. Basically you are using the same amount of lump in the XL that you would in the BGE Large.
    If I'm doing a direct cook and don't need the whole grill area, I just pile up the lump in the middle and don't fill the egg?  I don't think I'm wasting too many BTUs of heat as long as I'm hitting my target temp.  I'm unsure why this would save a ton of lump, though I do see some convenience factor.  Have you (or others with it) measured this over numerous cooks? 
    Cooking on an XL and Medium in Bethesda, MD.
  • Plano_JJPlano_JJ Posts: 448
    I am using half the lump I am used to using and doing the same cooks. Also, I see an efficiency factor, all the lump is burning when I am cooking now as opposed to lump being off to the sides not burning. Im sure the way you do it is fine but I like how the ring corrals all the lump and I dont have to worry about it. I also have half the mess that I used to around the fire grate. Anybody that has OCD like I do will appreciate the neatness and easy cleanup this product gives you. 
  • DuganboyDuganboy Posts: 1,118
    I have the wire reducing ring and as others have said it works great.  Sunday night is usually just the wife and me, so I can "circle the lump" get the fire roaring and then drop the steaks onto a lowered grid right above the lump.

    Makes it real easy to reverse sear also.  Put the steaks around the outside and they do not have any direct heat.  when you get the temp you want, fire it up and do the reverse sear for about a minute a side.
  • jccbone62jccbone62 Posts: 194
    Plano_JJ said:


    jccbone62 said:
    .
    I have the same product but noticed for indirect cooks I have to open the vents more to get the higher temperatures. Have you tried indirect cooks yet?

    Yes, today on some baby backs and it worked great. Not too much of a difference on the vents. Held 250 pretty easily.

    I was referring to high temperatures in the range of 400 degrees and above. Try using the ring, plate setter and see what your vent settings need to be to get something like 500 degrees. It was just something that I noticed but wondered if this type of correction is to be expected.
    XL owner in Wichita, KS
  • jccbone62jccbone62 Posts: 194


    Plano_JJ said:


    I see what your saying but wouldn't the air that is coming in around the reducing ring still feed the fire even though it is not coming up strictly through the charcoal? I would think the more air the better. I am asking because I don't know.

    My take on this is that airflow in the egg is going to always tend to go upward.  If you are using the wire ring, then the outside holes on the grate may contribute to the fire, but if you are using the solid-wall reducer I don't think the air would go up 3 or 4 inches then back down to feed the fire.

    The air coming out of the side holes in the firebox would need to travel horizontally for a ways also in order to contribute, but the general upward flow of gases would tend to push them up before they got to the fire.

    This is all mind-experiment stuff that I cannot prove.  It would be easy for you (or others) to try this for yourself.  If you think it does not help, no need to do it again...

    Ever since the early days of cooking on my first XL, I've been extremely sensitive to airflow that bypasses the charcoal bed.  For a while, I could not get my XL up to pizza cooking temperatures.  I discovered that some air would come through the gap between the fire-ring and egg shell and bypass the fire.  After I put an aluminum foil gasket between the fire ring and shell, my ability to get higher temps improved markedly.

    I can only relate what works for me.  YMMV.  If you try it, it doesn't help, and you think I'm full of hooey -- I will not be offended if you tell me so!


    I like your line of thinking. I also noticed this gap between the fire box and the shell and wondered how it affects how the fire burns in the xl egg. I will give your suggestions a try and see what happens. Thanks...
    XL owner in Wichita, KS
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