Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

One last question about smoking with chunk wood

Several folks replied to my question the other day about using chunk wood in the Egg. I will be firing the egg up bright and early in the morning to do a low and slow on roughly 24 lbs of butt. This will be my 1st voyage on the egg using chunk vs chips, so here's my question. I attempted  as a few here suggested to "stagger" or "layer" the chunk while filling with lump. I realize the difference between "good" smoke and "bad" smoke, if the chunk has been layered, isn't that going to introduce "bad" smoke on occassion through a low n slow?

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,681
    Nope.   Unless you put way too much wood in your fire.
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  • MadDAWGMadDAWG Posts: 15
    I put 5 approximately fist sized chunks in, too much?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,681
    hmmmm....that's more than I usually put in, but nothing wrong with that over a low and slow....more wood, more smokey flavor.  All personal preference.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • MadDAWGMadDAWG Posts: 15
    That is partially the reason I decided to use the chunk b/c I just don't seem to get enough smoke out of the chips, however, I don't want to over do it necessarily either...I guess its try it and see. I'm using pecan if it makes a difference. . .
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,610
    edited March 2013

    "Bad smoke" is a by-product of the VOC's resident within the process of making the lump charcoal-wood chips or chunks will produce "good smoke" so the question is "how much".  I roughly equate a healthy hand-full of chips to a chunk if that helps with the guesstimate.  And whether "Ford or Chevy" (chips vs chunks) disperse throughout the lump load for extended smoke over time.  Enjoy the journey!

    Louisville
  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    A big factor is the product you are smoking.  Some cooks can handle heavy smoke, while others cannot.  Two examples are chicken that can be overpowered by smoke taste, while ribs can handle smoke in large amounts.. 
  • When I'm doing butts or briskets I usually use 5 chunks also. I stage them around the edges and one in the middle. So far so good with no complaints yet. Putting on 2 butts tomorrow to take up to the parents Saturday.
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  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,277
    When I'm doing butts or briskets I usually use 5 chunks also. I stage them around the edges and one in the middle. So far so good with no complaints yet. Putting on 2 butts tomorrow to take up to the parents Saturday.
    The question is have you tried 3 chunks? The egg is a very good smoker. 
    All personal preference, try one or two less and see if you like it, you might be surprised.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • paulheelspaulheels Posts: 457
    Be mindful of the meat you are cooking, as others noted earlier. Also be mindful one wood you are using. I put four to five pieces bigger than my fist, not by much, for my BBQ. That atleast two or three butts. And I only use pecan.
    thebearditspeaks.com. Go there. I write it.
  • MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 1,015
    I definitely put more than five chunks in - more like ten, honestly. But I love the smoke...
    Large BGE -- Greensboro!


  • deekortiz3deekortiz3 Posts: 46
    edited March 2013
    I usually just use two or three (maybe 4). I toss them right on the fire and let them start going as soon as I get the meat on. 

    The meat will take on more smoke the colder it is, this will also help the coveted smoke ring establish. Once the meat hits around 130-140 internal the smoke ring will stop being growing.

    Instead of layering I would just soak a couple of the chunks. The soaked ones will take a bit longer to get going and stagger your smoke a bit. 
  • Ragtop99Ragtop99 Posts: 1,079
    Soaking chunks, unless done for a very long time, may not provide much delay if they are touching or near the fire.  The typical soaking period does not result in much water absorption.

    I use 4 to 8 chunks depending upon their size.  My mesquite chunks are closer to 2"x2"x2" so I use more.  My fruit wood are probably double that size, so if 3 of the 4 burn that's normally good.  I find the fire tends to burn toward the back first, so I always place one chunk in the back and one directly on the fire so that provides a good start.
    Cooking on an XL and Medium in Bethesda, MD.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,681
    It's not like a stick (offset) smoker where you got a blazing fire with everything lit.  The fuel in an egg burns like a candle.  If you want constant smoke, hide the wood evenly through the lump so it burns when the lump burns.  Pretend you're hiding Easter eggs for the kids.  Some people say season the wood, then they say soak it.  Don't make no sense to me.  Soaking does delay it burning, but the main effect is you get some steam.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

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