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Smoked Corned Beef Brisket

Took a 3 # corned brisket and soaked it to remove some salt. Man oh man what a meal. 230 to 250 degree until 200 degree internal temp.
Chesapeake, VA

Comments

  • Sandwiches and corned beef hash with eggs the next few days.
    Chesapeake, VA
  • What's the difference between a brisket and a corned brisket?

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632
    Corned beef is a salt cured beef product often made from brisket using prague powder or other curing agents. Beef round or navel can also be used.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • I like salt. I might have to try smoking one of those.

  • A smoked corned beef turns into pastromi
    Chesapeake, VA
  • SkinnyVSkinnyV Posts: 1,936
    I did the same the other day, the cheaper briakets lose more weight I notice. I lost about half after soaking and cooking. When I use cab I get little loss. Price was right on Kroeger brand though.
    Just enjoyed with home made rye and some beechers cheese off the panini press.
    Seattle, WA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,241
    A smoked corned beef turns into pastromi
    Yep, typically with a coriander/pepper rub.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632
    I believe there is a difference between corned beef and pastrami. Corned beef is cured in a brine. Pastrami is rubbed down with a cure and a paste, dry cured and then smoked.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,241
    edited March 2013
    I think they call that dry cure brisket Montreal Pastrami, or Montreal brisket.  It's sort of how I did my last one.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 2,778
    I have a 3 pound corned beef brisket flat in the freezer. How would y'all do it and what would you put on it?

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     LBGE,SBGE Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

  • Griffin said:
    I believe there is a difference between corned beef and pastrami. Corned beef is cured in a brine. Pastrami is rubbed down with a cure and a paste, dry cured and then smoked.
    Griffin, you are correct about there being a difference between corn beef and pastrami, being you must first corn the brisket and then smoke the corned beef to make pastrami. Google corned beef vs pastrami.
    Chesapeake, VA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,241
    shtgunal3 said:
    I have a 3 pound corned beef brisket flat in the freezer. How would y'all do it and what would you put on it?
    In a nutshell, soak it in water to remove some of the salt, make a 50/50 coriander seed/pepper rub and apply it.  Then smoke it to it's tender 190-ish.  In NYC they smoke to 150 and steam it before they carve and serve.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,241
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • shtgunal3 said:
    I have a 3 pound corned beef brisket flat in the freezer. How would y'all do it and what would you put on it?
    I coated the corned brisket, after soaking, with yellow mustard, then rubbed with pepper, hot
    paprika, brown sugar , no salt, and lightly with ground coriander, wrapped over night. Cooked indirect between 230 and 250 degrees until internal temp reached 200 degrees
    Chesapeake, VA
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632
    Griffin said:
    I believe there is a difference between corned beef and pastrami. Corned beef is cured in a brine. Pastrami is rubbed down with a cure and a paste, dry cured and then smoked.
    Griffin, you are correct about there being a difference between corn beef and pastrami, being you must first corn the brisket and then smoke the corned beef to make pastrami. Google corned beef vs pastrami.
    I did. Was just trying to point out there is a difference in the cure not just the way its cooked. i have done a corned beef following third eye's method and is really good, though. think the post was titled first pastrami. was two years ago. we might do one again weekend now that we have a slicer.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • SabbatSabbat Posts: 26
    So how long do you soak? I like salty and don't want to overdo the soaking...
  • It can be really salty. I would soak at least 24 hours and change the water at least once, maybe twice.
    LBGE and recently added SBGE
    Columbus IN
  • BOWHUNRBOWHUNR Posts: 1,392
    Here's a link to thirdeye's method which I have done and it was very good.

    http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/05/beef-pastrami.html

    Mike

    I'm ashamed what I did for a Klondike Bar!!

    Omaha, NE
  • I did two smaller corned beef briskets (about 4 pounds each) for New Year's. It was my first time in the egg, but I've done several on a regular smoker. I soaked it for several hours the day before, changing the water about every 30 minutes--approximately 5 times. Then I patted it dry and did a dry rub of various herbs--seasoned salt, pepper, garlic powder, some paprika, onion powder, a little chili powder--I don't like it real salty so I didn't add a lot of salty stuff. I didn't even use the packet that came with them. Then I wrapped it in foil and stuck it in the fridge.
     
    The morning of, I got the egg up to about 300, then put my briskets on (fat side up) and backed the heat down to 250-ish. I did notice it was harder to keep the temp low on the egg compared to my previous smoker, which leaked smoke and heat terribly and wanted to run cooler. I threw a handful of Jack Daniels chips on the coals and let it smoke a couple of hours. Then I threw another handful on and smoked it a few hours more (4-5 hours total). My dad is a pretty experienced smoker and taught me that meat will usually only take about 4 hours of smoke and then you're just wasting wood.
     
    After about 5 hours, I removed the briskets, used heavy duty foil to make a bowl shape around the brisket, then poured in some apple juice and folded the foil together on top to keep the liquid from leaking out. The apple juice helps combat some of the saltiness of the meat and makes it really tender. You could also use coke or another sweet drink in place of apple juice. I did this for both briskets separately, then placed them back on the egg for another 4 hours. When the brisket was 170 degrees, I removed them. Left them in the foil "pouch", wrapped each in a towel, and put them in a cooler until we were ready to eat about an hour and a half later. When I took them out of the cooler and unwrapped them, they were still hot and so tender they just crumbled under the knife. YUMMY! I've done regular brisket this way too. There's several ways to do brisket, but this always turns out great for me. When it comes to brisket, you always want to do low and slow. Brisket is really tough so it takes a long time to break down the meat and make it tender. I know they say about 1 1/2 hours per pound, but I usually cook mine about 9+  hours depending on how big it is.
    ShannyShooShoo 
    Owner of 1 LBGE, 1 Mini BGE, and 1 Wood-fired Brick Oven
    Mother of 4 boys, 1 obese feline, 1 mean-assed dog, and 2 completely spoiled sugar gliders
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