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Pink curing salt question

I got a nice belly from the local Mexican market this morning and went in search for curing salts.  I found a butchers supply house and went by and picked up some pink curing salt.  When I got home I read the small print and the label said "Sodium Nitrate 6.25 percent."  I had read that all pink salts were sodium "Nitrite".  This curing salt was repackaged by the local butcher supply house in their own bags.  So I am assuming that they got it in the wrong bag.  Can anyone verify that "ALL" pink curing salt is NITRITE.  When I search the internet for NITRATE it all seems to be a yellowish tint.  The People at the butcher supply place didn't inspire me to call them back and ask this question.

Comments

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,169
    edited February 2013
    Curing salt can be both. It may be a mis-print. Prague Powder #1 is only sodium nitrite, used for "quick" cured meat to be cooked, like bacon and sausage. Prague Powder #2 has both and is used for "long" cures in meat that remains uncooked, like hard salami. Over time, the nitrates are converted to nitrites.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,169
    Sorry, "Prague Powder" is curing salt, AKA "Insta-Cure" or "Pink Salt" They are differentiated by #1 and #2
  • My bag says, "Nitrate".  But it is pink in color.  The bag says nothing about "Nitrite".  I'm thinking that it is in the wrong bag unless "Nitrate" comes in Pink also.  My bag says "Prague Powder"  But does not have a 1 or a 2 on it.  I says..."good for up to 100 lbs of sausage".  I guess I'd better look elsewhere for something labeled nitrite.
  • NitrATE can most definitely be pink.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    They can both be pink.  It's either #1 or #2.  Probably #1, which is much more common.  So it's likely mis-labeled.  I think it's sodium nitrite, 6.25%.  If it is #2 and has some nitrate in it, it's not a big deal.
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  • so....should i risk it?  or go elsewhere?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    I'd use it as # 1.  I'm certain that's what it is.  If it's # 2, it'll have a little nitrate in it, it's not gonna hurt you.
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    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 2,753
    I don't know.  Label says Nitrate.  Prauge powder #1 and # 2 are both pink.  I'd have to assume Prague Powder #2.  It takes a long time for the Nitrate to convert to Nitrite, however, only issue is that when cooked greater than 600 degrees (like frying bacon) you can produce nitrosamines, which are 'cancer' causing.  Don't think one batch of bacon will make a difference.  I'd go ahead. 
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    One other note - they don't make 6.25% nitrate. It'll always have 6.25% nitrite.  Diff between #1 and #2 is there's a little nitrate in the #2.  It's added like Tjcoley says for long term shelf life - converts to nitrite over time, useful for long cures like bresaola. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
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  • makismakis Posts: 79
    No1 is Sodium Nitrite and it is used for fast cured meats that will be consumed in a relatively short time, like bacon and will be cooked. No2 is Sodium Nitrate with some Sodium Nitrite. It is used for long term dry aging meats like salumi and are NOT interchangeable. Be careful what you use.
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,079
    Pink curing salts are dyed pink so that you don't mistake them for regular salt, FYI.

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  • Thanks guys.......Yes I know what the difference between the two.  My problem as stated was that the labeling on the package didnt make sense as it stated that it was 6.25% sodium NITRATE.  the end result was that I went to William Sonoma and paid $10.63 for the same amount that I had given a dollar for.  Since this is my first bacon I figured.....what the hell....I'll splurge.  The next time I am near the Butcher supply place I'll stop by and see if I can find the original bulk packaging with the ingredients.  The end result is that the bacon is presently curing!  And I am cooking a small enderloin on my mini.  I am also munching on some pan fried nuggets left over from the pork belly trimmings.  so much for my diet!
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