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how to cook rozen 20lb turkey?

ronabobronabob Posts: 0
edited February 2013 in EggHead Forum
cooking fully fozen stuffed turkey any advice?

Comments

  • Step 1) unfoze it
    If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots.

    Durham, NC
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,229
    Lots of people don't stuff turkeys because the stuffing needs to reach 180F to be safe, and by that time, the turkey is over done.

    But, let the turkey sit at 40 degrees for a couple of days, and roast w. a lot of basting so the meat doesn't get overdone.
  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 769
    We stuff our turkey because it slows down the heating of the breast, we don't eat the stuffing though.  I agree the fozen bird should be thawed.

    Gerhard
  • Fully defrost it slowly by placing in a refrig for a couple of days.  I use "sour orange" marinate and inject the bird throughout.  I rub butter all over the outside of the bird, then sprinkle with Lawry's Poultry Seasoning.  Set my egg up for indirect cook gasket level at 325 degrees.  I set the bird upright in a large foil pan(throw away type).  Add about three sticks of butter inside the bird.  Let it cook, checking and basting every thirty minutes -- baste with the juices and butter found inside the pan.  When the bird reached the darkness you like - cover it with foil and continue to cook until you have 160 in the breast and 180 in the thighs.  Allow to reast at least 30 minutes while you continuosly baste the bird.  I have a large and have done as big as a 26 pound bird - had to rig a ratchet type tie down to keep the dome down for the first hour - after that it closed fine.  
  • I put a 22lb bird in a brine for 2.5 days and filled the cavity with onions and apples. Cooked for 3 hours at 425 dome. Came out perfect. Kind of off what ur trying.
  • Bvanma28,

    Very good point -- brining.  Makes a big difference in all poultry..

     

  • bvanma28 said:
    I put a 22lb bird in a brine for 2.5 days and filled the cavity with onions and apples. Cooked for 3 hours at 425 dome. Came out perfect. Kind of off what ur trying.

    what kind of brine do u use??


     

  • Been cooking spatchcocked chicken for three years on my egg and thought it couldn't get better. About six weeks ago i tried my normal recipe but by first brining the chicken.  The results were so much better, i couldn't get to my fresh chicken source fast enough to try it again. And then again and again!!  Chickens eight and nine are in my refrigerator right now for cooking tomorrow after a six to eight hour brine.  The best way i can explain the difference in the brined chicken is the finished chicken has a thick, rich, broth-like juice in it.  The brine i use, most of you can't get, but it is a basic salt base brine.  The brine i use is made for broasting chicken, which is a pressure fried process.  Broaster is a copyright name, and they make their own product, their brine is called "chickite".  It is cheap, but comes in 50 pound boxes.  I am sure they have a few "secret" ingredients, but it is mainly a very fine salt based product.  But my use of this product has made a major difference in my Spatchcocked Chicken.  I plan on finding a few fresh un-brined turkeys to try this same method on, and will let you know how that goes.. 

     

  • Been cooking spatchcocked chicken for three years on my egg and thought it couldn't get better. About six weeks ago i tried my normal recipe but by first brining the chicken.  The results were so much better, i couldn't get to my fresh chicken source fast enough to try it again. And then again and again!!  Chickens eight and nine are in my refrigerator right now for cooking tomorrow after a six to eight hour brine.  The best way i can explain the difference in the brined chicken is the finished chicken has a thick, rich, broth-like juice in it.  The brine i use, most of you can't get, but it is a basic salt base brine.  The brine i use is made for broasting chicken, which is a pressure fried process.  Broaster is a copyright name, and they make their own product, their brine is called "chickite".  It is cheap, but comes in 50 pound boxes.  I am sure they have a few "secret" ingredients, but it is mainly a very fine salt based product.  But my use of this product has made a major difference in my Spatchcocked Chicken.  I plan on finding a few fresh un-brined turkeys to try this same method on, and will let you know how that goes.. 

     

    How might one try this product?
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
  • You could look in your area for "Broaster" products which you will find under commercial kitchen products.  Again, "Broaster" is a copyright, but all their equipment has their name on it.  Some of these distributors "might" carry the "chickite", i recently have had to buy mine from a licensed food distributor due to a new food inspection requirement.  The cost is somewhere around $38.00 for a fifty pound box --  you use 4 ounces per gallon of brine, so you can understand how far it goes - thats a whole lot of chicken..   But i use it on my broasted chicken, i have two of them. 
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