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Short term steak preservation

I was shopping tonight and looked at the meat selection, not really intending to buy any...but Greenwise bone-in ribeyes were on sale and there were two really nice 1.3/1.4lb ones that followed me home.  I already have plans for the next 4 dinners.  It seems silly to freeze them, but I'm a little worried about just leaving them in the packaging in the fridge for 5 days.  Should I

a) freeze them for 2--3 days
b) do nothing and just cook them Sunday night
c) remove them from the foam trays and put them on a drying/cooling rack in the fridge (does 5 days count as dry aging?)

It's Tuesday now.  The sell by date on them is Thursday.
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Comments

  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,253
    I vote B. A is an option but your so close to cooking that it shouldn't matter. C will just dry them out a bit but not really enhance flavor at all.
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  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 843
    I vote c. And don't ask me how I know. (Nothing like ruining good steak.)
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,810
    B would be fine, leave them in the package
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  • MikeP624MikeP624 Posts: 292
    I would do C.  But make sure you salt them.  I did this with a whole beef tenderloin for 3 days.  Not sure it made much of a difference in taste, but it produced my best sear marks to date.  The salt removes the surface moisture so you get better sear marks.  Seriouseats.com did an article on the proper way to salt a steak/roast.
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  • (B) -- they may loose a little color, but they will be fine...
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  • Greeno55Greeno55 Posts: 539
    B - if they get a little slimy or change colours a bit, just wash em in some cold water before you cook.
    LBGE (2012), MiniMax (2014), and too many Eggcessories to list.  - Sudbury, Ontario
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  • bccomstockbccomstock Posts: 332
    edited February 2013
    D) Cook them now.. Why? Because reasons.

    :))
    LBGE
    MS Gulf Coast - Proud member of the Who Dat Nation!
    My Not Frequently Updated Blog: http://datcue.wordpress.com
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  • henapplehenapple Posts: 14,074
    I choose E. Buy several packs of micro brews, cook the steaks rare while I'm enjoying your beer on your porch.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 13,810
    Any quality non-ground beef just gets better as it ages - wet, dry.  Biggest problem is the significant other reading the sell-by date on the label and wondering if it's safe to eat.  For that reason, you may want to remove the label.  It'll be perfectly safe to cook on Sunday, at least as safe as it would be to eat on the sell-by date.  Any bad bacteria would be a product of the slaughterhouse, and not aging.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • I was always told about beef - "if you can get past the smell when cooking it-it's fine"..
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  • njlnjl Posts: 803
    edited February 2013
    The color change is just oxidation and nothing to worry about?  I decided to open them up, salt them, and put them back in the fridge on a cooling rack.  I'll probably cook them Sunday.

    image
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 13,810
    Yeah, it's just oxidation

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • njlnjl Posts: 803
    Interestingly, either the dehumidification of being open in the fridge overnight or the salting has largely reversed the color change process and the non-fat parts are back to almost entirely red.

    On a side note, what do you think of those as bone-in ribeyes go?  They're Publix Greenwise Choice grade.  Like I said, I wasn't even "in the market" for steaks, but I saw these on sale for less per lb. than the regular stuff and they just looked too good to not buy.
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  • love bone in ribeye
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  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,253
    It's my favorite cut, those look solid to me
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  • njlnjl Posts: 803
    I think I ruined them :(

    When "dry aging" them in the fridge, was I not supposed to salt them?  They came out very salty, and it was almost like the outside was "preserved" almost like it was turning into jerky....just not quite so tough.  Next time I find steaks like this, I think I need to either cook them in a reasonable time or freeze them.
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  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 843
    If you salt them and keep them in the fridge for hours (or days), it's considered a dry brine. I dry brine a turkey for 24 hours with 1T per 5 lbs. Sounds like you used too much salt. 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
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  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,030
    Check out this

    I have also seen stuff on America's Test Kitchen about letting a steak sit out overnight on a rack.

    I bet the issue is the amount of time you let the meat salt. It seems like you started to cure it.
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