Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Perfecting the Wing

I've cooked steaks, briskets, pork, cobblers, pizzas etc...and eventually I figure out how to cook them. One food I cannot get is the elusive wing.

Specifically I'm having trouble with two things. First I cannot for the life of me get them "restaurant crispy". Second, I seem to have a problem keeping my wings from taking on the flavor of the chicken fat that burns off. It is overpowering and shields the sauce at times. (Yes I've tried using a plate setter. That works better but I seem to think it makes it harder to get the right texture).

So with that being said, can anyone offer me some pointers on how they conquer these two problems...I just got my AR in the mail this week so including it in the solution is an option.

Thanks!
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Comments

  • Interesting thread. I'd like to hear some eggspert opinions too.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,588
    edited February 2013
    I cook mine indirect at 400 degrees. I mix corn meal in my dry rub and mix it up good. This helps crisp it up. Give a good coating of the rub. Also, the longer you leave them uncovered in fridge, the crispier the skin. On the grill, turn after 30 minutes. Dust the top side with rub again. Pull after 30 minutes. Toss in your sauce if you have one then back on egg for 15 minutes. Works great.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • Hi54puttyHi54putty Posts: 1,319
    I leave mine uncovered in the fridge overnight and then cook indirect at 500 until they are done. I also elevate them as high up in the dome as possible. They are always great.
  • bodskibodski Posts: 237
    If you cook indirect, putting a drip pan on your stone/plate setter along with spacers between the pan and stone may help with the burning chicken fat flavor.

    Cincinnati

    LBGE, Weber Gasser, Weber Kettle

  • I tried coating them with all kinds of suggestions, and also the overnight drying out in the refrigerator.  Now i like CRISP !!  Sooo crispy, i like to eat half the wing tip!!  What works for me is "High In The Dome"!!  Indirrect, 375 tp 400 degrees, i don't know if this makes any difference, but i use a one layer sheet of foil across my plate setter, with the edges turned up to keep the grease inside the foil.  This allows the grease to burn off during the cook.  And at this temperature, it causes some flames that lick the wings above.  I own  the three tiered rack and cook my wings, without turning them, to a very good crispness, then coat with the hot wing sauce before serving.
    Wings and squash 010.JPG
    2560 x 1920 - 2M
  • tjvtjv Posts: 3,224
    the restaurant wings are deep fried, so to reproduce them exactly on a grill is a challenge.  

    To help minimize the greasy flavor, couple things to try on the large egg.   Use the bge grid atop the rig and place the wings around the grid's outer edge.   This will be messy on your fire ring, but the drippings will be landing on cooler parts in the egg and not on the burning lump.  You'll need to turn and spin the wings more often to counter balance the outer edge placement.  

    Next, work the daisy wheel so it's open as much as possible.  This means controlling the temp using the lower slider.  With the daisy open, you are exhausting the smoke as quickly as possible.  You are also exhausting heat as much as possible, so it's a fine balance between temp, burning lump and smoke.

    Also, try different size wings.  If you are getting the big wings, that means big fat too.  Just try only drumettes and trim the fat not around the meat end. Chop the wing tips off before grilling. 

    On the xl, just divide the firebox, lump side, no lump side and grill by moving the pieces between both sides.  

    t
    www.ceramicgrillstore.com
    ACGP, Inc.
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,533
    edited February 2013
    Agree with Charlie ...high in the dome, with some thing to catch the grease.  One thing you can do is put a pan of cut up taters and/or veggies under the wings.  They will soak up the chicken drippings to help prevent burning, and you will get "chicken fried veggies" as a bonus. 

    Charlie- in that pic is that spaghetti squash with tomatoes?   I would like to hear how that turned out.  


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • The spaghetti squash needs to cook about 1 1/2 hours at 375 degrees, while the chicken wings take about 45 minutes.  So the squash goes on early and in the hotter area of the grill.  Clean out the seeds and i use Brummel & Brown's butter(made from nonfat yogurt, about three teaspoons, plus the fat from the chicken will keep the liquid going in the squash.  I am just a beginner at squash eating, but the wife loves it this way.  And the butternut squash is just as good, she say's it's the best she has ever had??  The butternut squash, i clean out the seeds and cut a channel, about 1/2"X 1/2" from the seed area up into the neck area, and again use the nonfat butter.  Both require about the same amount of time -- and will take some over cooking without a problem...
  • The Butternut Squash
    Portabella Marinated Pork Loin- Grilled Squash 009.JPG
    2560 x 1920 - 2M
  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390
    My fave for cooking wings is to hang them - I bought a few contraptions for this. Let them hang in the air and cook direct - nice crispy skin and incredibly juicy wing. I haven't found a better way to cook them.
  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390

    http://www.elitedeals.com/byc-0770-kd-l.html?productid=byc-0770-kd-l&channelid=FROOG&gclid=CNPGic6GsbUCFZSf4AodrTAA2A

     

    This is the one I use now.  I have one other that works pretty well, but the effect the same.  Very crispy skinned wings.  Then toss in your favorie sauce after they cooked and ready to go.  You can even put them back on the fire again if you want to sauce to cook into them - I don't.

  • solasola Posts: 118
    ID, can you fit two on a Lg?
  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390

    I have an XL and can.  Don't know about Large.  Actually, the link below is the one I have.  There are shorter ones out there that are just as good at hanging wings - I also have one that isn't as long and works well - so look around and I am sure you will find two that fit the Large.  I even saw some at Lowes/Home Depot (one of these stroes anyway).  Great for cooking drumsticks as well.  I also use it to hang thighs, come out fantastic.  I highly recommend them - they position the chicken perfectly, and the link below they are selling for $5 + shipping.   

    http://www.seattleluxe.com/product/nickel-plated-leg-wing-rack?cm_ven=GPS&cm_cat=Outdoor%20Cooking%20Accessories&cm_pla=feed&cm_ite=BC013410000&mr:trackingCode=94CC5403-14CA-E111-A306-001517384FBA&mr:referralID=NA&mr:adType=pla&gclid=CP2PgviKsbUCFQyg4AodRnAA4w

     

     

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,533
    The spaghetti squash needs to cook about 1 1/2 hours at 375 degrees, while the chicken wings take about 45 minutes.  So the squash goes on early and in the hotter area of the grill.  Clean out the seeds and i use Brummel & Brown's butter(made from nonfat yogurt, about three teaspoons, plus the fat from the chicken will keep the liquid going in the squash.  I am just a beginner at squash eating, but the wife loves it this way.  And the butternut squash is just as good, she say's it's the best she has ever had??  The butternut squash, i clean out the seeds and cut a channel, about 1/2"X 1/2" from the seed area up into the neck area, and again use the nonfat butter.  Both require about the same amount of time -- and will take some over cooking without a problem...
    Thanks Charlie....sounds great!


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • Solson005Solson005 Posts: 1,841
    I will give a few of these tips a try and like making legs using the rack @IrishDevl suggested, for the superbowl I made 20 lbs of wings so I didn't use the rack since I was doing so many. I tried the cornstarch method on two batches with mixed results.. 

    As @tjv mentioned restaurant wings are deep fried so you might never get to your "perfect wing" depending on your tastes. (I managed a Buffalo Wild Wings many, many, years ago and didn't like the look of wings for years. But like making them on the grill these days)

    I have found I like sticky wings off the BGE better than a "crispy" one and have better results with that type. 

    These are the favorites so far: 
    Large & Small BGE, CGW Two-Tier Swing Rack for BOTH EGGS, Spider for the Wok, eggCARTen & and Cedar Pergola my Eggs call home in Edmond, OK. 
  • solasola Posts: 118
    IrishDevl said:

    sola said:

    Thanks VI

    VI is back?
    Haha. Sorry bro. Mardi Gras day here... May be slightly impaired.....

  • Great feedback everyone. I appreciate the tips. I am anxious to put them into practice this weekend!

  • BjorgBjorg Posts: 231
    edited February 2013
    Irish, I was on the market for one of those so I called Seattle Luxe and the picture they are showing is wrong, as even though it says stainless stell on the image, they are selling the one you have on the top link with is Nickel plated with foldable legs. Product code: 0770-KD-L 

    The Stainless steel version doesnt have foldable legs and is product code: 0770-PDQ.  http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-0770-PDQ-Wing-Rack/dp/B0009KF3QC/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    I prefer stainless steel, but I also like foldable legs. How will the nickel plating hold up, anybody?
    Quebec - Canada
  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390
    Bjorg said:
    Irish, I was on the market for one of those so I called Seattle Luxe and the picture they are showing is wrong, as even though it says stainless stell on the image, they are selling the one you have on the top link with is Nickel plated with foldable legs. Product code: 0770-KD-L 

    The Stainless steel version doesnt have foldable legs and is product code: 0770-PDQ.  http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-0770-PDQ-Wing-Rack/dp/B0009KF3QC/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

    I prefer stainless steel, but I also like foldable legs. How will the nickel plating hold up, anybody?

    The one I have doesn't fold and I think stainless.  That looked like it in the picture, but $5 seemed like a steal.  I like it, and actually have 2 of them - only used one so far. 
  • GramblerGrambler Posts: 137
    Have you tried dusting with corn starch? I've never done it but some folks on here says it helps crisp them up.
  • BjorgBjorg Posts: 231
    I ordered two of the stainless steel with non fordable legs for my XL. Thanks for the recommendation! 
    Quebec - Canada
  • I have tried the corn starch, and a few other coatings with poor results -- the chicken never got crisp and the corn starch just made the chicken finish with a thick dough like coating..  High in the dome at 375 degrees, with just a poultry seasoning(i use Lawry's Chicken and Poultry Seasoning), of even S&P!.  It will crisp any chicken part.
  • caneggercanegger Posts: 508

    I have breaded mine and got a real crispy layer too them. on a rack at 350 indirect.

  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390
    Bjorg said:

    I ordered two of the stainless steel with non fordable legs for my XL. Thanks for the recommendation! 

    Welcome. You do have to use full wings - I hope you know that. And the wing is more a crispy wing from a direct cook - will be much different and in my opinion better taste to deep fried
  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390
    Haven't tried indirect with that set-up.
  • BjorgBjorg Posts: 231
    edited February 2013
    Not a problem, Costco sells them full. On the amazon page, most people use it for legs and indirect so I think both direct and indirect would work. Experimenting is part of the fun. 

    Speaking of wings, I now use them to do chicken stock. Check this video out for a great recipe: 
     (12:55 for the broth)




    Quebec - Canada
  • I have tried the corn starch, and a few other coatings with poor results -- the chicken never got crisp and the corn starch just made the chicken finish with a thick dough like coating..  High in the dome at 375 degrees, with just a poultry seasoning(i use Lawry's Chicken and Poultry Seasoning), of even S&P!.  It will crisp any chicken part.
    The trick with cornstarch is a very light dusting. I use a one hand sifter with a sieve underneath it. And if you do get too much in an area, spray it with pam or some kind of oil. You will see white spots where the starch is too heavy when the white disapears on the rest. I've been doing this for 40 years and they can come out as good as fried.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • rtt121rtt121 Posts: 420
    I have tried the corn starch, and a few other coatings with poor results -- the chicken never got crisp and the corn starch just made the chicken finish with a thick dough like coating..  High in the dome at 375 degrees, with just a poultry seasoning(i use Lawry's Chicken and Poultry Seasoning), of even S&P!.  It will crisp any chicken part.
    The trick with cornstarch is a very light dusting. I use a one hand sifter with a sieve underneath it. And if you do get too much in an area, spray it with pam or some kind of oil. You will see white spots where the starch is too heavy when the white disapears on the rest. I've been doing this for 40 years and they can come out as good as fried.
    Is too much corn starch the reason when I used this technique the skin came out cripsy.... but sort of leathery.

    Best way to describe it was biting in.  It was nice and cripsy with a crunch but you couldnt bit through it without ripping the whole mass of skin off?
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