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We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Pork Butt - First Time on the BGE

My wife has made this recipe a number of times over the past couple of years:


It always comes out amazing, but so far we haven't tried it on the BGE.  I'm planning on trying it for our small-ish SuperBowl party.  

I'd appreciate any advice the good folks here have.  She normally gets a Boston butt, and follows the recipe.  After the rub, it goes in the oven for about 6 hrs at 300, until it hits 170.

Any suggestions?  I have plenty of time, so I don't mind cooking at a lower temp for longer if it'll make it better.  Also, do folks here use any wood chunks when doing pork butts?  
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand.

Durham, NC
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Comments

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,564
    edited February 2013
    Sounds like a good recipe.  One thing is- most people cook until an internal temperature of 190-200 in order to pull.  At 170, I would think it would be difficult to pull.  I watched the video, and he is chopping the pork.  Nothing wrong with that :)...but if you want pulled pork I think you need the IT to be 190ish. 

    Personally I like doing my butts at about 250 dome for a long time, but there are plenty of folks that advocate the "turbo butt" method.  

    Definitely use some wood.  I like a combination of hickory and apple.  


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • Agree with everything that SmokeyPitt said. Technically the pork is "done" at 145-155 depending who you ask, but if it is cut at anything less then 190 it is typically referred to as "chopped" pork. Nothing wrong with good chopped pork.   True fall apart melt in your mouth pulled pork is hit somewhere above 190 internal temp. I typically go to 200 degrees as long as I have time for the pork to rest. I always use hickory wood and sometimes will mix in other flavors for a twist.  In my experience I like the slower product better then the turbo, but perhaps I've just been unlucky.  Good luck and enjoy the cook.
    I raise my kids, cook and golf.  When work gets in the way I'm pissed, I'm pissed off 48 weeks a year.
    Inbetween Iowa and Colorado, not close to anything remotely entertaining outside of football season. 
  • I "advocate" the "turbo Cooking" it's a whole lot easier and the finish time is more accurate.  All butts need to rest in a cooler for at least an hour, plus keep in mind they can remain "in" this cooler up to five hours, and remain very hot and ready to pull -- without a problem.  That gives you plenty of "serving time" leeway.

    This is my turbo method.  I inject an hour or so ahead of time with about six ounces of Lawry's Teriyaki with pineapple juice marinade.  Sold at most grocery stores.  Cost about $3.50 for a 12 ounce bottle.  This will NOT make the pork taste like "teriyaki", but gives it a rich taste!  Because i am injecting, my finish temperature is raised to 210 degrees, normal butts are pulled at 190 to 200 degrees.  The first two hours are my smoke period, i use pecan, but other woods will work the same.  During this period i cook indirect, plate setter legs up with a drip pan made out of foil -- grill will be at gasket level.  iI use "Bad Bryon's Butt Rub" lightly, which is a mild rub, but use your choice.  Place butt directly on grill till you reach at least 160 degrees internal.  Remove the butt and place on foil and wrap tightly, use three layers of foil, maybe even four to safegaurd the juices produced by the butt.  Return the foiled butt to the same grill setup, and increase the grid temperature to 330 to 350 degrees, and cook till you reach 210 degrees internal.  Remove from grill and place in a small fitting cooler for at least an hour(or up to five hours) before serving.  If you are cooking say for a party the next day, and want to refrigerate the butt for re-heating, still allow to rest for one hour, then put in the refrigerator in the same foil.  To re-heat, place in a 300 degree oven about two hours before serving, pull just before serving and pour any huices back over the pulled pork.. 

  • robnybbqrobnybbq Posts: 1,469
    I have done long low and slow overnight (18 hours) @ 250 to an internal temp of 197 when the bone was falling out - Was very good. 

    I may try a turbo butt this weekend and hope it comes out just as good.

    _______________________________________________________________
    LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


    Garnerville, NY
  • I was converted to the turbo style by a fellow fisherman who cooked on an old beat up Webber upright smoker after many years of "low and slows".  I end up with more juice, which means more flavor and avoids the stress of long overnight cooks.  I have cooked up to seven butts at a time using this method and never had a problem

    [img]http://i367.photobucket.com/albums/oo112/2728charlietuna/2012ReunionFood009.jpg[/img]

  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 1,723
    Rub the night before and stick it in the fridge. Plate setter legs up with drip pan.cooking grid on plate setter legs. Butt on grid. 350 dome until IT of 160. Wrap butt in foil and put back on grid until IT reaches 190 - 200. Wrap in towel and put in cooler until ready to pull. I put 50/50 water and apple juice in drip pan and spray butt with 25/75 cider vinegar/apple juice 3 or 4 times during first 3 hours and again before wrapping with foil.

    Only done this for the first time yesterday but it was the best pulled pork I have ever had.

    I've done the 12 -14 hour low and slow but I prefer this "turbo" method.

    I give all credit to Mickey. Thanks again. Plan to have pulled pork tacos tonight.

    ___________________________________

     

     LBGE,SBGE Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

  •  I have used that same recipe many times.  I always cooked it until the bone came out easily.  I have not tried to do it in the oven since I got my BGE.  I have smoked a butt on the BGE and used the mustard sauce from Tyler's recipe with good luck.  My recommendation would be to smoke in on the BGE until IT of 195-200 they proceed with the mustard sauce per the recipe.  It will turn out superior to the oven method.   Good luck with you cook.
    Edina, MN
  • It's interesting folks here suggest cooking higher than the recipe suggests (170), because I've actually been the one to pull it in the past when my wife has cooked it in the oven.  For the most part, it's always been pretty easy to pull, sometimes more so than others, and I'd just assumed that was due to some variety in the quality of the meat.  But I'll definitely follow the advice here and cook it to a greater IT.  

    Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand.

    Durham, NC
  • If there is a way to calibrate your thermometer, you should do it, because at 170 degrees, i think you would be bending the forks trying to pull any pork.  For a nice pork roast to be served sliced, the internal temperature (no pink) is 160 internal degrees.  At 170 degrees, many times this would not even be thru the "stall"............... 
  • Conversation with my wife at dinner over this:

    Me: "A lot of people on the forum suggest cooking it to a higher temperature, so it'll be easier to pull."
    Wife: "Oh I've never cooked it to a temperature!"
    Me: "So what did you do?"
    Wife: "I've just stuck a fork into it and pulled."

    There you go.  
    Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand.

    Durham, NC
  • BGE RULE NUMBER ONE -- Never argue with your wife !
  • I also don't think that letting the butt rest is necessary.  I've not tried the turbo method so when I pull at 200ish after 15-18 hours, it's ready to eat once it cools a bit- maybe 15 or 20 minutes.  I know the ice chest and foil stuff will keep it warm longer if you're not ready to eat but IMO, it tastes perfect fresh off the BGE.
    XLBGE- Anchorage, AK
  • bccomstockbccomstock Posts: 324
    edited February 2013
    I did a butt recently and it was one probably the first one I've gotten up to 200 degrees internal.. It completely fell apart as I was taking it off the v-rack.. Never had that happen before, but I'm definitely planning on hitting 200 for any future butts..
    LBGE
    Proud member of the Who Dat Nation!
    My Not Frequently Updated Blog: http://datcue.wordpress.com
  • LarrymacLarrymac Posts: 93
    edited February 2013

    I "advocate" the "turbo Cooking" it's a whole lot easier and the finish time is more accurate.  All butts need to rest in a cooler for at least an hour, plus keep in mind they can remain "in" this cooler up to five hours, and remain very hot and ready to pull -- without a problem.  That gives you plenty of "serving time" leeway.

    This is my turbo method.  I inject an hour or so ahead of time with about six ounces of Lawry's Teriyaki with pineapple juice marinade.  Sold at most grocery stores.  Cost about $3.50 for a 12 ounce bottle.  This will NOT make the pork taste like "teriyaki", but gives it a rich taste!  Because i am injecting, my finish temperature is raised to 210 degrees, normal butts are pulled at 190 to 200 degrees.  The first two hours are my smoke period, i use pecan, but other woods will work the same.  During this period i cook indirect, plate setter legs up with a drip pan made out of foil -- grill will be at gasket level.  iI use "Bad Bryon's Butt Rub" lightly, which is a mild rub, but use your choice.  Place butt directly on grill till you reach at least 160 degrees internal.  Remove the butt and place on foil and wrap tightly, use three layers of foil, maybe even four to safegaurd the juices produced by the butt.  Return the foiled butt to the same grill setup, and increase the grid temperature to 330 to 350 degrees, and cook till you reach 210 degrees internal.  Remove from grill and place in a small fitting cooler for at least an hour(or up to five hours) before serving.  If you are cooking say for a party the next day, and want to refrigerate the butt for re-heating, still allow to rest for one hour, then put in the refrigerator in the same foil.  To re-heat, place in a 300 degree oven about two hours before serving, pull just before serving and pour any huices back over the pulled pork.. 

    Charlie:
    What is the temp of the egg in your first 2 hours when you are smoking ?

  • My first two hours are at "MY" minimum temperature which is about 240 to 250 degrees.  I have found i get the best heavy thick smoke during this period while the butt is exposed.  After wrapping i bump it up to about 330.  If i need to shorten the cook time i have cooked all the way up to 400 degrees -- again, i cook to 210 internal degrees before pulling because it is injected.
  • SteveWPBFLSteveWPBFL Posts: 1,177
    Got a pair of butts on now, the boneless Costco two pack. They're rubbed and sitting indirect at 270F dome. I cook until 200F internal temp and remove from the Egg provided the temp probe sliiiiiiides in and out with no resistance. That's the key, breaking down the collagen so the fibers will pull apart easily. Some butts break down better than others. .....
  • So you are doing a "kind of" low and slow at 270 degrees!  Good luck - Good eats !
  • Here it is just after being pulled.   I went with 265 grate temp for the first 6 hours.  Then I kicked it up to 300 for the last two, until it reached an IT of 205.  

    It had a nice smoke ring.  There was a noticeable difference in the color compared to when my wife does it in the oven.  Hers tend to come out much more black on the surface, whereas this was more brown/red.  The flavor and moisture was great.  You can definitely taste the smoke in the meat, and in fact I think it's a bit saltier than when it's done in the oven.  I'm not sure if the smoke enhances the salt flavor or not, but the rub uses a fair amount of salt.  I'll probably try a different rub next time.  


    pulled_pork.jpg
    1632 x 1224 - 701K
    Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand.

    Durham, NC
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 13,666
    IMO the holding of a butt in cooler is just for convenience. No reason if ready to eat not to take from Egg to pull. Same said for foiling.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • No cooler or foil for mine.  It went right from the egg to being pulled.
    Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand.

    Durham, NC
  • I disagree and think anything worth cooking requires the "rest" to allow the juices inside the meat to equalize temperature and return throughout the product..  And it makes a difference in the end product. 
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,564
    It looks darn good from here!  Appears to be nice and juicy.  I don't like my rub too salty either, so thanks for the tip.  I might have to give this recipe a try.  I have found that when a rub is too salty, I will add more dry mustard powder.  It it fairly innocuous so it is a good way to bring down the salt ratio. 

    I usually like to do a rest, but I agree with Micky that resting in the cooler is just to keep warm and not a necessary step.   You can always do a short rest on the counter tented loosely to give the juices time to redistribute.  


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,564
    Thanks for the explanation professor!  :-B


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • I will stick with what has worked for me -- trial and error -- and lean in the direction of Myron Mixon's recommendations.  There are a "many ways to skin a cat"  and this subject it no different than the one about the chicken and the egg!!  Just take an example when you cook a good steak, slap it on a plate and cut it, what happens?  The juices run out and that steak is sitting in a puddle of flavor.  Take another steak cooked at the same time and allowed to rest, less than half the huice escapes the steak.
  • 500500 Posts: 1,193
    Thanks Eggcelsior.  Everybody says rest for an hour.  But I agree; I like the taste of the Butt better if I'm up against the timeline for when we plan to eat.  If I can hit the 195* mark and pull within a half hour, I like the taste and texture better than resting for 3 hours.  I think the bark is much better also, as it seems to soften quite a bit in the FTC stage.
    Large BGE; Midlothian, Virginia
    I like Pig Butts and I can not lie.
    "Barbecue is a journey, one meal at a time."
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 13,666
    edited February 2013

    I will stick with what has worked for me -- trial and error -- and lean in the direction of Myron Mixon's recommendations.  There are a "many ways to skin a cat"  and this subject it no different than the one about the chicken and the egg!!  Just take an example when you cook a good steak, slap it on a plate and cut it, what happens?  The juices run out and that steak is sitting in a puddle of flavor.  Take another steak cooked at the same time and allowed to rest, less than half the huice escapes the steak.

    Agree on steak. Do not agree in butt (pulled pork).
    Difference of moo and oink.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • So how about a pork steak VS  a beef steak ?
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,265
    I will stick with what has worked for me -- trial and error -- and lean in the direction of Myron Mixon's recommendations.  There are a "many ways to skin a cat"  and this subject it no different than the one about the chicken and the egg!!  Just take an example when you cook a good steak, slap it on a plate and cut it, what happens?  The juices run out and that steak is sitting in a puddle of flavor.  Take another steak cooked at the same time and allowed to rest, less than half the huice escapes the steak.
    You're right with that. Trial and error is what makes the world go 'round, if you will(aside from the Sun's gravitational pull on our orbit; we'll stick with terrestrial physics for now). I typically use a science-based approach to everything I do. There is always an answer to "Why?", so objective skepticism is your friend. Look at Myron. He was an early proponent of "turbo-ing" pork on the competition circuit. He went at 300 and everyone else thought he was going to dry it out. 3 Memphis in May World Championships later....

    Science is trial and error, just a more defined and regimented approach. It allows me a more stream-lined process to come up with results that I enjoy. The example you stated is exactly what I said about a steak with moist, tender results vs tough, leathery ones.

    Whatever works for you, great, that is what matters. All these differences in techniques have been developed over time on multiple types of cookers; with each proponent finding the best "crutch" for their cooker to produce the best results. The unifying thing here is that we are cooking on a smoker/grill that removes the need for many of these crutches based on it's ability to provide insulative, consistent heat.
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