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OT--- Anyone roll their own sushi at home?---OT

ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,586
edited January 2013 in Off Topic

Have wanted to learn for a long time. Thinking about taking a class to learn how to do it. This forum seems to be loaded with people who love and appreciate food in general so I am looking forward to your responses. My main concern is finding sushi grade fish in Columbia...

Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
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Comments

  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,134
    There have been some local classes for sushi-making and I've been tempted too, but it just isn't practical for me.  I'd have to drive 45 minutes to buy the sushi-grade fish, I'd have to buy, what, 1 oz. of each of four or so types of fish (which the mongers probably wouldn't do, and I wouldn't blame them), and drive back, all just for one meal (I don't think I could buy a pound, portion it, and freeze it, I think sushi meat needs to be fresh).  
    I'm just happy that there's so many good restaurants within a mile of where I live now; it wasn't that way in 1995.  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,586
    Botch said:
    There have been some local classes for sushi-making and I've been tempted too, but it just isn't practical for me.  I'd have to drive 45 minutes to buy the sushi-grade fish, I'd have to buy, what, 1 oz. of each of four or so types of fish (which the mongers probably wouldn't do, and I wouldn't blame them), and drive back, all just for one meal (I don't think I could buy a pound, portion it, and freeze it, I think sushi meat needs to be fresh).  
    I'm just happy that there's so many good restaurants within a mile of where I live now; it wasn't that way in 1995.  

    Yeah, that is the same issues I am facing. Well, I think I will face if I go on a hunt for sushi grade fish. SWMBO and I love sushi. We do not get out to get it as much right now with a 6 month old, so I thought about trying to make it. We will see. Hoping for some inspiring pics/comments from the forum.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    Test - my previous post on this thread was held for moderator approval.  WTF?!


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 7,208
    They are attacking us with indiscriminate and random PAA's. What PITA.
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,586
    Test - my previous post on this thread was held for moderator approval.  WTF?!


    We got you. Come again, sir.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    I don't want to re-write all that.  Anyway, important thing is, in general, use salt water seafood.  "Sushi grade" is not an official, regulated grade.  In general it means the fish was frozen based on some guidelines that kill parasites. 

    You shouldn't use fresh fish unless you're going to pickle or cure it, or it's been checked out by a certified sushi chef.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    Yep, the link I tried adding kept it from posting.  sushinut dot com
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,586
    I don't want to re-write all that.  Anyway, important thing is, in general, use salt water seafood.  "Sushi grade" is not an official, regulated grade.  In general it means the fish was frozen based on some guidelines that kill parasites. 

    You shouldn't use fresh fish unless you're going to pickle or cure it, or it's been checked out by a certified sushi chef.

    Damn Nola. Way to bust my bubble... guess I will go back to making mangrates ..
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,586
      sushinut dot com
    Thanks
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • BENTEBENTE Posts: 8,337
    i used to do some. back when i drove to atlanta alot. mainly what you will find in colombia is ok for most sushi rolls. there are not many rolls you want to do with raw ingredients. when i used to do it i would do california rolls, shrimp tempura. and so on. i would be hesitant to try tuna rolls and other things like that. if you did a salmon roll i would smoke a filet and use it in the roll. there are several stores that sell the usual stuff to do it. one thing i learned real quick is to wrap your bamboo mat in plastic. the reason i dont do it much anymore is i cant make it to a store that sells the roe (fish eggs). although they may not be so hard to find at whole foods or something along those lines. publiz will save you for the most part on buying the mat and ginger etc. but for the roe i dont think they carry it. you can ask them to sell you some of the roe from the sushi store inside publix. i don't eat their sushi i guess my tastes have evolved not to like it unless it is rolled fresh.

    happy eggin

    TB

    Anderson S.C.

    "Life is too short to be diplomatic. A man's friends shouldn't mind what he does or says- and those who are not his friends, well, the hell with them. They don't count."

    Tyrus Raymond Cobb

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    Chubbs said:
    I don't want to re-write all that.  Anyway, important thing is, in general, use salt water seafood.  "Sushi grade" is not an official, regulated grade.  In general it means the fish was frozen based on some guidelines that kill parasites. 

    You shouldn't use fresh fish unless you're going to pickle or cure it, or it's been checked out by a certified sushi chef.

    Damn Nola. Way to bust my bubble... guess I will go back to making mangrates ..
    Now's about the time I freak out like VI and post a "I'm *&^%$ OUTTA here!!!" thread.... I think it was this mangrate thing that started it all.  ;)
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • Doc_EggertonDoc_Eggerton Posts: 3,575
    We make rolls, nigiri, and sashimi.  Take the class!  Yours likely won't look as pretty as a restaurant, but will taste just as good.

    Note, you need a really sharp knife, and if you strike out on your own remember it is salt water fish only and you should freeze it for a couple of days before eating to dodge parasites. 

    Salmon is our favorite, tuna is good, and I like shrimp.  I have not found a source for octopus.

    Oh, also sushi rice is different than Uncle Ben's and you need some rice vinegar.
    Pasquali Luciano
    Buon appetito to all the BGE family
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE and lots of toys

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    Here's some good general info from the world wide interwebs:

    What is sushi grade fish and where do I buy it?

    The question of what is sushi grade fish comes up a lot and no one seems to accurately answer that question. After some research I am now able to provide information as to the guidelines and regulations that are followed in the seafood industry in terms of serving raw seafood. As for micro standards for sushi or sashimi grade seafood, I have spoken with many in the seafood industry who supply ‘sushi grade’ fish for sushi and sashimi served at restaurants and they all give me the same answer… they do not know of any regulations from either the FDA or any other agencies regarding ‘sushi grade’ seafood, which is why suppliers have set up their own micro and chemical parameters for their products. A personal search of FDA documents turns up the same results, no clear standards as to what makes fish ‘sushi grade’ or ‘sashimi grade’ and no definition of the term. The only concern any inspectors have is referred to as the parasite destruction guarantee, which is accomplished by ‘freezing and storing seafood at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 7 days (total time), or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -31°F (-35°C) or below for 15 hours, or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 24 hours’ which is sufficient to kill parasites. The FDA’s Food Code recommends these freezing conditions to retailers who provide fish intended for raw consumption (for further information, please visit the FDA website). I know that is a mouthful, but it’s the facts.  Other than a few specific organisms of concern for some seafood, sashimi standards are set as any other ready-to-eat item, e.g. sushi. This means that, aside from the FDA recommendations and local Health Department requirements, there are no laws or recommendations for "sushi/sashimi grade" fish. It is no more than a marketing term.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • LitLit Posts: 2,228
    We used to make it all the time its really pretty easy and I have always just used the sushi grade either from super h mart or whole foods. When you slice it keep the knife blade wet. Also putting saran wrap over the sushi roller makes it easier to roll and clean. The whole process takes a long time though. Easily an hour just to prep the rice correctly.
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 25,540
    Chubbs said:
    I don't want to re-write all that.  Anyway, important thing is, in general, use salt water seafood.  "Sushi grade" is not an official, regulated grade.  In general it means the fish was frozen based on some guidelines that kill parasites. 

    You shouldn't use fresh fish unless you're going to pickle or cure it, or it's been checked out by a certified sushi chef.

    Damn Nola. Way to bust my bubble... guess I will go back to making mangrates ..
    Now's about the time I freak out like VI and post a "I'm *&^%$ OUTTA here!!!" thread.... I think it was this mangrate thing that started it all.  ;)
    Would you get it right. It's "I can remember when this was a much more friendlier place.....I'm outa here" Sheesh!

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • They are attacking us with indiscriminate and random PAA's. What PITA.
    I bet it's not "they". I have a funny feeling about this one.



  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,134
    edited January 2013
    nolaegghead said:  "Sushi grade" is not an official, regulated grade.  In general it means the fish was frozen based on some guidelines that kill parasites.    
     
    Ah, so it IS previously frozen.  
    Now, I'm wondering if I can buy it from my purveyor, still frozen, and cut it into meal-size chunks for individual thawing (I wouldn't need four or so varieties, I could easily make a meal of just hamachi nigiri).  
    Hmmm....
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 25,540
    They are attacking us with indiscriminate and random PAA's. What PITA.
    I bet it's not "they". I have a funny feeling about this one.



    Ya think?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • calikingcaliking Posts: 4,518
    We used to have regular sushi parties when we lived in Chicago, because we had access to good fish. The suggestions for the saran wrap around the mat and the sharp knife are spot on.

    It's a lot of fun. Enjoy!

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • doubledouble Posts: 1,212
    Here is another online seller. Something I have also wanted to try http://www.catalinaop.com/
    Lynnwood WA
  • They are attacking us with indiscriminate and random PAA's. What PITA.
    I bet it's not "they". I have a funny feeling about this one.



    Ya think?
    Chicanery and tomfoolery are afoot.......



  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 25,540
    I would say Aye Aye to that

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • It is now legal for rolling your own for recreational use in Colorado and Washington state.  Oh, sorry you meant fish.  My bad.

    Ernie McClain

    Scottsbluff, Nebraska

    (in the extreme western panhandle of NE)

  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390
    When I go fishing and catch stripers, black fish etc... I always eat it sushi (raw) never cook it and eat it over a two day period.  I don't freeze the fish at all, never had a problem.  When restaurants buy sushi you think it had been frozen previously?
  • I've been doing my own for some time now.  Once you get the cooking/seasoning/cooling down of the rice correct, things will fall into place.  I usually do spicy crunchy tuna rolls and use the left over tuna to make a Poke and some sashimi pieces.  The other critical part in my opinion is not overstuffing the rolls and being able to roll them correctly and tightly, and as mentioned, a very sharp knife for cutting.  I watched a ton of videos on uTube, never took any classes, so it can be done :)

    Mark

  • HicHic Posts: 312
    Bought the wife a SushEZI for christmas. She likes sushi but with only veggies in it. We've used it a few times. It's super ezi :)

    Large, medium, small and a mini. Egg'n, golfing, beer drinking, camping and following football and baseball.
    Atlanta NOTP suburbia.

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 4,825

    I've been doing my own for some time now.  Once you get the cooking/seasoning/cooling down of the rice correct, things will fall into place.  I usually do spicy crunchy tuna rolls and use the left over tuna to make a Poke and some sashimi pieces.  The other critical part in my opinion is not overstuffing the rolls and being able to roll them correctly and tightly, and as mentioned, a very sharp knife for cutting.  I watched a ton of videos on uTube, never took any classes, so it can be done :)

    Mark

    The rice - this is the secret. Buy Sushi rice and learn how to season and cool it. Sockeye and tuna were our mainstays. Haven't made any for a couple of years, it is simply available at too many places for very reasonable cost here in the Vancouver BC area. Lots of fun, but can be very frustrating if the rice is not at the right temp. 
    Delta B.C., Canuckistan - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 7,476
    As previously mentioned, the rice is the key, cover the wrapper with saran wrap for ease of cleaning, keep hands wet so rice does not stick to fingers. Youtube  has great tutorials.Many pieces of sushi do not have to have fresh fish.

    Here are some bits of info I have gathered over the years.


    http://www.sushiencyclopedia.com


    Although there are a number of Sushi types that most people order, in reality, you can choose any combination of fish and vegetables you like. Therefore, in addition to some of the better-known Sushi types, you can be as imaginative as you like and create your own Sushi variety. The first list includes some of the most common ways in which Sushi is made:
     
    Bara Sushi –
    1 The vinegar rice and ingredients are mixed as a salad
    Chirashi Sushi –
    1 The rice bed has various layers of fish and is served in a bowl called Gomoku Sushi or Iso-don
    Futomaki –
    1 This is a large Maki roll that has many different ingredients using Nori, which is a seaweed wrap
    Inari Sushi –
    1 Instead of using the traditional vinegar rice, brown, fried tofu is used
    Nigiri Sushi –
    1 Vinegar rice topped with a slice of raw or cooked fish, or vegetables
    Okonomi Sushi –
    1 This is home-style Nigiri
    Onigiri –
    1 This Sushi is made with regular steamed rice and rolled into a ball with other ingredients
    Oshizushi –
    1 Vinegar rice and other ingredients of choice pressed into a mold
    Temaki –
    1 These are cone-shaped seaweed rolls also called a hand roll
    This second list includes all the various types of Sushi:
    Amaebi –
    1 Sweet shrimp
    Boston Rolls –
    1 Crab, salmon, and scallion
    California –
    1 Crab and avocado
    Ebi –
    1 Shrimp
    Egg Salad Rolls –
    1 Hard-boiled eggs, mayonnaise, and green onion strips
    Hamachi –
    1 Yellow Tail
    Hirame -
    1 Halibut
    Holiday Rolls –
    1 Turkey, cranberry salsa, and cream cheese strips
    Hotate –
    1 Scallop
    Ika -
    1 Squid
    Ikura –
    1 Salmon roe
    Kani -
    1 Crab
    Kappa Ma –
    1 Cucumber
    Maguro –
    1 Tuna
    Masago –
    1 Smelt Roe
    Mirugai –
    1 Giant clam
    New York Rolls –
    1 Smoked salmon, apple, and avocado
    Pesto Rolls –
    1 Turkey or chicken, cream cheese strips, and pesto
    Philadelphia Rolls –
    1 Smoked salmon, cucumber, and cream cheese strips
    Saba –
    1 Mackerel
    Sake -
    1 Salmon
    Shrimp Rolls –
    1 Shrimp and cream cheese strips
    Smoked Salmon Rolls –
    1 Smoked salmon, cucumber, and cream cheese strips
    Spider Roll
    1 Soft Shell Crab, Asparagus, Avocado, Scallions & Roe, Topped with sweet sauce.
    Summer Melon Rolls –
    1 Prosciutto and melon strips
    Tako -
    1 Octopus
    Tai -
    1 Red snapper
    Tamago –
    1 Egg
    Tekka Maki –
    1 Tuna Roll
    Temaki –
    1 Spicy tuna
    Texas Rolls –
    1 Cooked beef, cucumber, and spinach leaves
    Toro –
    1 Fatty Tuna
    Tuna Salad Rolls –
    1 Tuna salad and lettuce leaves
    Unagi –
    1 Eel
    Uni –
    1 Sea urchin
    Veggie Rolls –
    1 Pesto, cucumber, tomato, mushrooms, scrambled egg, scallions
    2 Keep in mind that some of the Sushi types mentioned above are new recipes from people with creative minds and all of these have become quite popular in the United States.
    This third list includes other ingredients that are commonly used for Sushi:
    1 Short-grain white rice
    2 Nori (seaweed)
    3 Mirin (sweet rice wine)
    4 Seasoned rice vinegar
    5 Prawns
    6 Barbecue or regular eel
    7 Caviar
    8 Albacore
    9 Avocado
    10 Alpha or bean sprouts
    11 Asparagus
    12 Shitake mushrooms
    13 Cream cheese
    14 Tempura batter
    ************************
    1 As you can see, Sushi is not simply rice and fish. While you can create any ingredient combination that sounds appealing to you, the one thing you want to do is maintain the integrity of this Asian food. This means serving the Sushi with a choice of soy sauce or wasabi, along with either pickled ginger or green tea as a way to cleanse the palette.
    2 You will find that making Sushi is actually very easy. That coupled with the fact that it is full of incredible nutrients, low in calories, and tastes delicious, there is no doubt that Sushi will become your next favorite food.
     
     Recipe Type
    Appetizer, Asian
     
     Recipe Source

    Source: Internet, 2012/02/19


  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    I've done California rolls probably half a dozen times.  Stick with saltwater seafood - its generally safer than freshwater.  Sushi grade is not a regulated grade.  Basically, there are some freezing guidelines to killing parasites, but the main consideration would be the source of the fish.  Check out http://www.sushinut.com/

    I use a hair dryer to cool down the rice.  Making and rolling them is tricky at first, but the more you do, the easier/better they come out. Less is more (like a pizza). 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    maybe the link I added made the post not post.  Lemme try that.  http://www.sushinut.com/

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    I've done California rolls probably half a dozen times.  Stick with saltwater seafood - its generally safer than freshwater.  Sushi grade is not a regulated grade.  Basically, there are some freezing guidelines to killing parasites, but the main consideration would be the source of the fish.  Check out http://www.sushinut.com/

    I use a hair dryer to cool down the rice.  Making and rolling them is tricky at first, but the more you do, the easier/better they come out. Less is more (like a pizza). 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 9,001
    maybe the link I added made the post not post.  Lemme try that.  http://www.sushinut.com/

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone
    New Orleans

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