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A Newbie Question About Prime Rib

Anyone have any recommendations/ideas/strategies for prime rib?  I've got 19 pounds and a "serve time" of noon on Sunday.  We're willing to cook to medium rare, medium at the most, and then finish it off individually for those who really want it DONE.

I'd welcome suggestions on time, temp, smoke, searing, and anything else anyone thinks this inquiring newbie might need to know.

Thanks! 

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,170
    edited January 2013
    Salt and pepper, cook indirect at 225 to 125 internal. Pull.  It'll rise up to medium rare.  Keep it warm in the oven until serving.  Probably take 3 hours, plus or minus an hour (depends on the circumference).

    Buy a few cans of beef consome for the au jus.  Put it in a baking pan on the stove and cook up (ruin) custom orders of medium to well done.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,170
    If the bones are still attached, cut them off and tie them back where they were.  Don't bother catching any drippings, there are some, but not much.  If you're getting lots of drippings, you're cooking it too fast.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • rtt121rtt121 Posts: 425
    If the bones are still attached, cut them off and tie them back where they were. 
    Hmm why is that?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,170

    rtt121 said:
    If the bones are still attached, cut them off and tie them back where they were. 
    Hmm why is that?
    The bones add flavor when cooking, but when you want to carve it, it's a lot harder to remove the bones when it's hot, and it's hard to try to control your portions if you don't remove the bones.  So you cut them when it's easy (cold) and tie them back on.  They often come this way, and most butchers will do it for you.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,041
    Nola has it-but I would run around 250-260*F on the calibrated dome thermo.  That seems the sweet-spot for low&slow BGE temps.  It's all good and an easy cook-enjoy the journey!
    Louisville
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,170
    Yeah, that's an easier to regulate temp.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,724

    rtt121 said:
    If the bones are still attached, cut them off and tie them back where they were. 
    Hmm why is that?
    The bones add flavor when cooking, but when you want to carve it, it's a lot harder to remove the bones when it's hot, and it's hard to try to control your portions if you don't remove the bones.  So you cut them when it's easy (cold) and tie them back on.  They often come this way, and most butchers will do it for you.
    Not very often I do this, but I disagree slightly with Nola - a respected scientist and expert foodie. I do not think the bones add anything when slow cooking a standing rib. Use the bones with the au jus to create a succulent dipping sauce/gravy. The ribs can be "cooked" on their own for a real treat. 
    Tie the rib roast with the bones off into a round shape - it all cooks the same. 225-250 target pull when internal is 10 below your target temp. 
    I always reverse sear as well - SWMBO really likes a crusty ruined piece of shoe leather.....
    Easy to carve and the roast will be same edge to edge. 
    Not sure what it is called, but there is a piece on the small edge of the rib that I also remove, makes it easier to tie in a circle. I use the meat in this piece for stir fries, beef bites etc.... 

    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Skiddy what you say about the bone not imparting flavor on a low and slow cook has a lot of merit and support in the food world.  
    I always have the butcher almost remove the meat from the bones and then tie it back up.  The bone acts as an insulator, but above and beyond that, the bones are the cook's treat.  I would rather gnaw on the meat around the bone than anything else.
    As far as first sear/reverse sear I have done both and I don't have a preference.  DIL is like your SWMBO jerky/shoe leather her preference, so she always gets the outside piece.  
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,170
    I'll agree with ya Skiddy - probably not much flavor imparted from the bones, and I agree the bones should never go to waste - great for other things - next time I'll roast them in the oven and make au just.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • jscarfojscarfo Posts: 328
    On Friday salt it on all sides, and put in fridge uncovered. On sat make a good paste with olive oil an rosemary, Tyme,an pepper rub it all over meat leave in fridge. Get egg ready indirect at 250 for 2 1/2 Hrs to 120 degrees take off remove plate setter get up to 500 sear all sides for 5 min per side. If its early wrap in foil an towel an put in cooler . Don't waste your time with bones.
    image.jpg
    2592 x 1936 - 2M
    image.jpg
    2592 x 1936 - 2M
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,724
    Ya know, there is always something to learn. A few years ago, we always left the bones tied to the roast. My daughter in law was the first to go for them. Lately, last couple of years, we have been removing them and using for au jus, she complained and asked if the only bone in meat would be chicken. 

    I found 8 ribs (2 different roasts) in the freezer. Slow smoked them and foiled, then "crisped", now everyone wants bones to nibble on. 

    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • hondabbqhondabbq Posts: 847
    I have prime ribs at work and I cut the bones off before roasting adn I take the bones home to cook up for me. One of the perks of running the kitchen.

    Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    Sledder, Quadder, Rock and Roller, Big Green Egg Smoker.

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,712
    edited January 2013

    Not sure what it is called, but there is a piece on the small edge of the rib that I also remove, makes it easier to tie in a circle. I use the meat in this piece for stir fries, beef bites etc.... 

    Skiddy,
    Are you talking about the scarapelli or rib cap? The part that is sort of opposite the bones?
    I didn't konw if "rib" was short for the whole "rib roast" or just the ribs themselves.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,712
    Skiddy,
    This part:


    rib-side-down-Edit.JPG
    250 x 177 - 11K
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,724
    @Eggcelsior
    Skiddy,
    This part:


    No - the exact opposite side of where your arrow is, In the photo you included it is the small triangle piece of meat with rib below, fat cap to the right and a small fat line between it and the rib eye. 
    The part you point to we call the cap, it is often removed when standing rib is put on sale here in Canuckistan. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,712
    Okay. I just wanted to make sure. On that, Canuckistan wins. I have never seen the cap for sale individually. It is one of the best cuts of beef. My favorite part of the roast.
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,724
    Okay. I just wanted to make sure. On that, Canuckistan wins. I have never seen the cap for sale individually. It is one of the best cuts of beef. My favorite part of the roast.
    I agree - I think they use it for kabobs or other cuts - horror of horrors, extra lean ground beef. 


    IMGP2582.jpg
    4288 x 2848 - 385K
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,872
    I've always cooked with bones on (either tied on with twine or still attached).  Not saying it makes it any better...but just what I have done.  No reason the bones have to go to waste if you do this.  After I carve, I throw the bones back on the grill and sauce them and make them into dino bones.  Usually I do this the following day.  Remove bones from roast, wrap and fridge, the next day throw them on the grill.  If you are cooking the roast low n slow as Nola suggested then the "dino bones" are already pretty tender and makes a great treat the next day. 


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,167
    edited January 2013
    There is a treasure hidden in the cap meat. It is called spinalis. Most tender meat on the animal.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    There is a treasure hidden in the cap meat. It is called spinalis. Most tender meat on the animal.
    Best part of the ribeye for me....
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,712
    There is a treasure hidden in the cap meat. It is called spinalis. Most tender meat on the animal.
    BINGO!!!!! Full of flavor too, unlike un filet de beouf.
  • Thanks to all who responded!  Every question is an education.
  • BBQ_GregBBQ_Greg Posts: 9
    edited January 2013
    The meal is done!  Almost 150 served prime rib and turkey.  Because of my responsibilities during cook time I gave your advice to 4 guys who had never cooked on a BGE.  Even though I started the fire for them, they did everything else.

    The result?  The best prime rib most anyone had ever eaten.  Even though they "cremated" some of the PERFECT prime rib for those who can't stand the sight of blood in their meat, the cremated stuff (finished on a flat commercial grill) was the last to go.  The carnivores came out of the woodwork.  We had people coming back and picking the scraps out of the bottom of the pans just for one more taste.

    In the end, I am about 98% sure that there will be three new BGE owners in the very near future.  Though it was their first time with a BGE they are all hooked.

    Next event?  A brunch called Green Eggs and Ham.  You guessed it, all cooked on BGE's.

    Thanks again.
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