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Ants Climbing A Tree

Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,947
edited January 2013 in EggHead Forum
Fooled you.  That is the actual name of a Szechuan dish (google it).  It is very popular in China.  Essentially, it's ground pork in rice noodles.  Kind of a Chinese spaghetti.

Here is my first stab at it.  I think next time, I'll cut back a little on the noodles, but it was very enjoyable.

The raws.
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Stir fry the ground pork in sesame oil

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After adding the aromatics and sauces, add the water that will absorb the noodles.  Then add the noodles.  As with all stir frys, it is imperative to keep the ingredients sizzling hot throughout the cook.

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Plated.

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__________________________________________

Dripping Springs, Texas.
Gateway to the Hill Country

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Comments

  • GarlicGarlic Posts: 40
    That looks good. I am thinking about getting a wok for our xl, what size would you recommend? Also how do you control the temp of the fire?
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,632
    As usual Gary, looks like a magazine. Nicely done. Adoption offer is still on the table.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • @Garlic. I have a Large, but TravisStrick has an XL and I believe he has a 20 inch that he likes a lot.

    Others may disagree, but I don't control my fire.  I'm of the school that the fire can't get too hot.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • calikingcaliking Posts: 5,826
    Great cook! That plated shot is exquisite.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,241
    You can't get it too hot...on the egg.  I've burned my seasoning off on a propane burner.  Anyway, if there's water in the food, it's not going to get much over the boiling point of water.  Get a nice sear, fast with some heat and that lovely wok hei smoky aroma.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,632
    How do you get green onions in that small of a batch. I always get them for a recipe and have to try hard to use them before they go bad.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,704
    Looks great Gary. I've eaten the dish before. How do you hydrate the vermicelli?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Looks great Gary. I've eaten the dish before. How do you hydrate the vermicelli?
    Thanks Steve.  I put them in warm water for 10 minutes, then drain.  They are actually cooked by the boiling cup of water in the wok.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,704
    I need to go to an Oriental cooking supply. My original pho shop had a special little chinois sorta thing that they used on the noodles. I've had a load of bad luck with the fine vermicelli. Always get it too cooked and it falls apart in the dish

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • That's a real nice cook VI.

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

  • solasola Posts: 118

    You can't get it too hot...on the egg.  I've burned my seasoning off on a propane burner.


    Ha. I seasoned mine the same way and its 75% gone also.
  • MickeyMickey Posts: 15,256
    Nice Gary. Not bad photos as well.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, just added a Mini Max 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015 http://saladoeggheadgathering.blogspot.com

  • Mighty_QuinnMighty_Quinn Posts: 1,878
    looks really good...I prefer (rice) noodle dishes over a separate entree with rice on the side when cooking/ordering asian food.
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,068
    edited January 2013
    VI - one of the best easy asian dishes, has lots of variations. As always great plating.
    The dry noodle to lean pork ratio is about 2:3, or for 8oz of dry noodle, 12 oz of pork. 

    Try using thick, dry rice noodle. Soak them in lukewarm water for about 20-30 minutes until soft, drain and hold. 
    Mix, cornstarch, soy, sesame oil, rice wine and pork together - let stand 10 minutes then into the wok after garlic chile and onions. Add noodles and mix to warm. 

    Serve with chopped cilantro, chinese parsley. The idea (I'm told) is the cilantro, parsley and pieces of pork look like ants climbing a tree trunk made of thick rice noodle. Grandkids love it (based on the name I think)

    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Doc_EggertonDoc_Eggerton Posts: 4,032
    Very nice, I have not done noodles enough.
    Pasquali Luciano
    Buon appetito to all the BGE family
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE and lots of toys

  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,742
    You're not having trouble burning the sesame oil?  I'd always thought that was a "finishing" oil, and that it burned too easily.   
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,068
    Botch said:
    You're not having trouble burning the sesame oil?  I'd always thought that was a "finishing" oil, and that it burned too easily.   
    I agree, it is a finishing oil and does burn if you put it in a hot wok by itself, IMHO. The temp of the wok should be lowered to bring sesame oil, ginger and garlic to aromatic levels, once you add the other ingredients, you are good to go. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Thanks, folks.

    @Botch and @Skiddymarker .  Yes, I also have always used sesame oil as a finishing oil. However, the first time I make a recipe, I try to follow it exactly and then tweak it later.  This recipe called for stir frying the pork in sesame oil.  The wok was sizzling hot, but the sesame oil did not burn, and it cooked the pork well.  I have not read of sesame oil easily burning, so I did not have any qualms about using it.

    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • @Botch and @Skiddymarker

    Your comments on sesame oil burning piqued my interest.  I looked up the smoke points of it and peanut oil and found that sesame oil has a smoke point of 410-420° and peanut oil has a smoke point of 440°, which is not much difference.

    Were your comments based on experience or just what you read or heard?

    Inquiring minds want to know.  
    :)
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,742
    @Botch and @Skiddymarker

    Your comments on sesame oil burning piqued my interest.  I looked up the smoke points of it and peanut oil and found that sesame oil has a smoke point of 410-420° and peanut oil has a smoke point of 440°, which is not much difference.

    Were your comments based on experience or just what you read or heard?

    Inquiring minds want to know.  
    :)
    I've just read it, never actually stir-fried with it (although its kinda pricey to cook with, but I want to try your recipe).  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,244
    looks great, not on my diet right now with the carbs but a soon to do cook. what always baffles me in the asian market is the noodle section, completely confusing to me which one to buy out of the hundred different types. with the sesame oil, its the flavor breakdown with the sesame oil, not the flashpoint, adding at the end adds more true sesame flavor but with most american palates sesame is pretty strong anyways
  • That looks so good, VI -- I wish I had a bowl of it for breakfast.  8->
    I'm Kristi ~ Live in FL ~ BGE since 2003.
    I write about food & travel on Necessary Indulgences -
    You can find me on Facebook & Instagram, too! 
  • Dyal_SCDyal_SC Posts: 1,968
    Looks awesome!! I use sesame oil in my wok all the time too...never had an issue with it burning. But I don't leave the oil in there too long by itself...I would imagine it would burn if one did that. I think the meat probably cools it down enough to keep it from burning. Love the nutty flavor it gives to Asian stir frys.
    2014 Co-Wing King
  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    as always....looks great!  Got to try my wok on the egg soon.
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,632
    AleBrewer said:
    as always....looks great!  Got to try my wok on the egg soon.

    Yeah, I need to brush mine up with some steel wool to get the light rust off of one area then reseason it this weekend. Been way too long.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,068
    edited January 2013
    Village Idiot said: @Botch and @Skiddymarker
    Your comments on sesame oil burning piqued my interest.  I looked up the smoke points of it and peanut oil and found that sesame oil has a smoke point of 410-420° and peanut oil has a smoke point of 440°, which is not much difference.
    Were your comments based on experience or just what you read or heard?
    Inquiring minds want to know.   :)

    My comments were based on experience, but I can always improve on what I have learned. I have been taught that sesame oil is available, like most oils in a number of different varieties. Basically it is my understanding, light sesame oil has a smoke point much like peanut oil, around 230C (450F). I may be blowing smoke on this but I think it is a cold pressed oil. It is very light in colour, looks like canola or corn oil. Dark sesame oil, the nice flavored one, is usually toasted and has a lower smoke point of about 175C (350F). 
    Kadoya (Japan), like most asian sesame oils, is a toasted blend, with great flavor.It is much like olive oil. Extra light has a smoke point of around 475F, while EVOO is only around 375F. 
    If it works for you, by all means use it. If you get a chance, I'd encourage you to look for light sesame oil if you use it to stir fry.  Most of my recipes tend to add dark sesame oil along with chopped/slivered ginger and garlic during the sauce portion of the cook. The wok temp is lowered, allowing the oil and root aromatics to cook but not burn. Not necessarily better, just different. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • SM,

    I use Kadoya sesame oil. It was the first brand I ever bought and I've stayed with it.  This is the first dish I've used sesame oil as the stir fry oil - I normally use peanut oil, and I will continue to do that for other cooks.  I think putting it in first made it lose some of it's flavor because I could not detect it in the final meal.  Next time, I'll stir fry with the peanut oil, and add it towards the end, as I normally do.  Like I said, I always try to make the recipe exactly as stated the first time I make a dish, then tweak it in later dishes.  Thanks for the exchange.  This has been interesting to me.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,244
    SM,

    I use Kadoya sesame oil. It was the first brand I ever bought and I've stayed with it.  This is the first dish I've used sesame oil as the stir fry oil - I normally use peanut oil, and I will continue to do that for other cooks.  I think putting it in first made it lose some of it's flavor because I could not detect it in the final meal.  Next time, I'll stir fry with the peanut oil, and add it towards the end, as I normally do.  Like I said, I always try to make the recipe exactly as stated the first time I make a dish, then tweak it in later dishes.  Thanks for the exchange.  This has been interesting to me.
    thats my feelings on sesame oil. something else that puzzles me is peanut verse canola, in the breath of the wok book the author changes it from recipe to recipe but never says why

  • thats my feelings on sesame oil. something else that puzzles me is peanut verse canola, in the breath of the wok book the author changes it from recipe to recipe but never says why
    Yeah, I remember noticing that too.  I just stick with the peanut oil, or grapeseed oil if I'm out of the peanut.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,068
    @fishlessman - the reason to use peanut vs canola is, IMHO, the final flavor of the dish. Peanut oil will add a touch of flavor, canola will tend to be more neutral. Personally, I have trouble telling the difference. Canola is much cheaper, so it tends to be my oil of choice for stir fry. Stir fries that need a touch of flavor probably use peanut, those where the food stands on its own, may use Canola - just a guess on my part. 

    Another example is the use of EVOO and butter vs Canola and butter when frying breaded cutlets and schnitzels. Very noticeable difference in taste. 

    I think it was the original chef's preference, or to ensure a final flavor. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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