Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Merry Christmas and may your holiday be filled with delicious food and loved ones...to help you devour the food! Our Holiday Entertaining Guide can help if you’re still making a Christmas menu. If you’re looking for fun, last minute holiday activities, check out EGGcellent Sugar Cookies, BGE Cake Pops, Santa Hat Brownies, Pig Candy or Holiday Drinks! See you in the New Year EGGheads!

The 17th Annual EGGtoberfest was amazing - here are the highlights Click Here

Kroger style boston butt with 3% solution

I picked up a boston butt from Kroger's to smoke today. Noticed this morning that it says contains up to 3% solution of salt and sodium phosphate.  I guess this is a brine?

I have never used a butt with a 3% solution like this? Any experience with such butt's?  How do they compare to plain butt's without the solution?

Comments

  • Where's stike when ya need him?? @nola can prolly break it down. But my .02 is they turn out great what ever it is. I cook ribs and butts and tenderloins from Kroger all the time. I rinse them off after I open them with cold water just cause. I believe some packages have this "brine" and some don't. Have to read the fine print.

    Hope this helps.


    _______________________________________________

    LBGE & SBGE (big momma and pat)
  • mimaulermimauler Posts: 119

    Here ya go:

    For the purposes of this discussion, enhanced meat can be defined as fresh, whole muscle meat that has been injected with a solution of water and other ingredients that may include salt, phosphates, antioxidants, and flavorings. Regular meat can be defined as fresh, whole muscle meat that has not been injected or marinated.

    goggle enhanced meat

     

  • I cook them when they are cheaper than the ones I get a Sam's club.  I have never had anyone be able to tell me there is a difference in the taste when they have it instead of what I cook from Sam's club.
  • Basically it is meat injected with a solution of sodium phosphate and sodium chloride.  Meat industry uses this solution to inject moisture into the meat.   So, besides paying for the meat you are also paying for additional water and salts.   There are many good arguments for both pro-brine and con –brine, but it really comes down to your choice and your preference. 

    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 5,537
    I'm in the "can't tell the difference camp"-especially after a protracted low&slow cook.  All tastes great to me but then again my taste buds may be contaminated by the supervisory adult beverage or more... :)>-
    Louisville
  • tjvtjv Posts: 3,275
    3% ain't bad.  It's the 8% - 12% added solutions on ribs and chicken that Kroger carries that can ruin good intentions. t
    www.ceramicgrillstore.com
    ACGP, Inc.
  • tays44tays44 Posts: 84
    Good explanation here. As long as you stay away from anything that has any sort of enzyme (bromelen, papain, ficin) you will be fine. Those enzymes especially papain can really compromise the structure of the muscles in proteins. A simple solution such as the one you bought is just for tenderizing and can also increase shelf life in some cases.

    Basically it is meat injected with a solution of sodium phosphate and sodium chloride.  Meat industry uses this solution to inject moisture into the meat.   So, besides paying for the meat you are also paying for additional water and salts.   There are many good arguments for both pro-brine and con –brine, but it really comes down to your choice and your preference. 


    - EAT BEEF -
Sign In or Register to comment.