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Chili In A Bread Bowl

I've been craving chili recently so upon realizing I had enough ingredients in the fridge/freezer/pantry to make a batch, i had to whip some up. Dark beer, black and kidney beans, diced onion, diced green and red bell pepper, diced jalapeño, garlic, chili powder, ancho chile powder, cumin, coriander, onion powder, oak chunks, dried oregano (not pictured- crushed tomatoes, beef broth, and coarse ground chuck) sorry i can't give amounts in a recipe...i just wing it to taste. Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos simmered on egg (300*) for a few hours with oak chunks for smoke. Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos meanwhile, i made a batch of sourdough french bread (500 Grams starter, 750 g bread flour, 20 g kosher salt, 430 g water) and shaped into bowls (not done on egg...can i be forgiven?) Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos served up with dollop of sour cream Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

Comments

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,526
    So much win! I'm glad to see that you consider cooking and art and baking a science!
  • absolutely..i've always been that way, although, increasingly i am seeing more and more into the science of cooking with the whole modernist cuisine movement.
  • 48 hour cold rise/fermentation on the dough...
  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,167
    Impressive.  Got me wanting to cook up a batch.  Do you keep an active culture running at all times on the sour dough?  I'm curious on the baking side just getting into it.  Also, don't let these Texans come in and bully you around calling it bean soup.  I'm sure they will chime in sometime soon.
  • thanks...yep, i keep a starter culture alive in the fridge. its pretty easy to feed/maintain..I've had mine for well over a year now, and it came from a bakery that's had it going for almost 15 years now. yeah, spare me the beans comments...i could care less what the texas opinion on beans is...that''s the way we like it.
  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,167
    thanks...yep, i keep a starter culture alive in the fridge. its pretty easy to feed/maintain..I've had mine for well over a year now, and it came from a bakery that's had it going for almost 15 years now. yeah, spare me the beans comments...i could care less what the texas opinion on beans is...that''s the way we like it.
    agree on the beans.  I'm going to have to find me a starter, and try this business out.
  • my plan for the bread bowl innards-- "french toast" bread pudding for Christmas breakfast.
  • i'm sure it's doable...i'd be willing to send you some starter if we figure out the best way...its pretty resilient stuff.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,526

    thanks...yep, i keep a starter culture alive in the fridge. its pretty easy to feed/maintain..I've had mine for well over a year now, and it came from a bakery that's had it going for almost 15 years now.

    yeah, spare me the beans comments...i could care less what the texas opinion on beans is...that''s the way we like it.

    While it's true that it isn't "true" chili as in chili con carne, since that is the origin of "a bowl of red", there are plenty of variations that people have made their own. It's the same with BBQ. "true" BBQ in the USA is pork and pork alone, by roasting a whole pig over coals. For me, there is no such thing as bbq outside of what comes from the Carolinas. Obviously, this has been disambiguated throughout many regions, so I'll live and let live. I call my meat and bean stew chili, anyway ;)
  • Great looking stuff Quinn. I like the idea of "just winging it" takes the pressure off of finding the damn recipe. 
    I like ours in a simple french bread "roll", I used to keep a culture of brewing yeast going, but never kept a bread culture. 


    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • thanks...yep, i keep a starter culture alive in the fridge. its pretty easy to feed/maintain..I've had mine for well over a year now, and it came from a bakery that's had it going for almost 15 years now. yeah, spare me the beans comments...i could care less what the texas opinion on beans is...that''s the way we like it.
    While it's true that it isn't "true" chili as in chili con carne, since that is the origin of "a bowl of red", there are plenty of variations that people have made their own. It's the same with BBQ. "true" BBQ in the USA is pork and pork alone, by roasting a whole pig over coals. For me, there is no such thing as bbq outside of what comes from the Carolinas. Obviously, this has been disambiguated throughout many regions, so I'll live and let live. I call my meat and bean stew chili, anyway ;)

    so why is i that when you quote me, the paragraph formatting is there as I typed it, but in my actual comments show up a one paragraph?
  • ha...and then when i quote it from you it changes back to one paragraph.... thanks skiddy- 95% of my cooking is winging it. it makes life easy...keep a well stocked fridge and pantry and i'm always ready to at least throw something presentable together.
  • Here's a starter I have used in the past. I did use Honey The easiest and most successful method of making your own starter is to combine water, flour, and a tablespoon (or packet) of active dry "domestic" yeast which is available at any grocery store. By letting this brew sit for several days as you would with a dried sourdough starter, the domestic yeast will go "wild" and develop the familiar tang of its truly wild cousins. You'll probably catch some wild yeast in the process as well. 2 cups warm water 1 tablespoon of sugar or honey (optional) 1 tablespoon or packet active dry yeast 2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour Pour the water into a 3- to 4-quart glass or ceramic container or bowl, and add dissolve the sugar or honey and the yeast in that order. Stir in the flour gradually. Cover the jar or bowl with a clean dishcloth and place it somewhere warm. By using a dishcloth instead of plastic wrap, you'll allow any wild yeast in the area to infiltrate and begin to work with the domestic yeast which itself is beginning to develop "wild" characteristics and flavors. The mixture will begin to bubble and brew almost immediately. Let it work anywhere from 2 to 5 days, stirring it about once a day as it will separate. When the bubbling has subsided and a yeasty, sour aroma has developed, stir your starter once more and refrigerate it until you are ready to use it. The starter should have the consistency of pancake batter.
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