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Tenderloin for Christmas

For Christmas, we always get together with our best friends and this year, we get to host. I am going to make a whole 6-7# tenderloin on the Egg. I have done a lot of research and there seems to be lots of strong opinions on the best way to cook. Here is my plan. I am going to get the Egg fired up and sear on all sides at normal height for the grid. Then, I will take the meat off and let the egg cool down to around 350-400. I will then put the roast back on raised grid, direct and cook until about 135 or so and then pull and let sit for 15 minutes before slicing and serving. I am still working on what seasoning and sauce to do but any thoughts and opinions on my cooking plan would be greatly appreciated. I've never done one of these on the Egg and don't want to screw it up
Clarendon Hills, IL

Comments

  • reh111reh111 Posts: 146
    I used to do tenderloins on the grill but since I've gotten my egg I haven't had a chance to do one.  Your post has me considering it for Christmas Day (we have our big meal the night before).

    I don't really know if you need to sear a tenderloin.  I would probably just put it on the grill raised rather than fight having to get the temp down after the sear.  I think you'll get enough char on the outside w/o searing and tenderloin tends not to have a lot of fat in it anyway so I don't think you have to worry about "sealing in the juices" with a sear - but I may be way off base on that.

    I wouldn't wait to pull it at 135.  That's pretty much medium and it will continue to cook after you pull it.  If it has a smaller end, that end will tend to become more well done which may satisfy some.  One of the things I always liked about tenderloins is that, if I did it right, I would have pieces that were from medium rare to well done on the smaller end.  I like mine med/rare but there are those who want theirs well done.  I think I'd pull mine about 120 - 125 and let it sit the 15 minutes you talk about.

    If you find a good seasoning with lots of herbs, be sure you wrap it up the day before in the rub and let it sit overnight.  I used to have a recipe for a great rub but I don't know where it is.  Had lots of herbs.

    Good luck and Merry Christmas.
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,360
    I did two small tenderloins yesterday. One with DP swamp venom and one with a soy sauce. They were gone in a minute.

    1/4 cup evo
    1/2 cup soy
    1/3 cup brown sugar
    2 tb spoons garlic
    I just squeezed some mustard in

    Great stuff.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • Are we talking Pork or Beef?
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • Oh sorry. I am talking beef.
    Clarendon Hills, IL
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 1,051
    +1 on what @reh111 said and wrap with bacon!

    ____________________
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  • Definitely pull it sooner that 135, and don't mess with the initial sear.
    LBGE
  • njlnjl Posts: 768
    For beef, pull it at 125F max (120 is better...it'll probably still make 125F after you pull it at 120F).  The heathens who like their beef burned can microwave it to get the desired brownness.
  • DonWWDonWW Posts: 253
    +1 with previous posts.  Scale your temp back.  No need to sear.  I would settle the egg at about 300 degrees.  Pull the tenderloin off when it reaches about 115 - 120.  Wrap in foil for about 15-20 minutes.  Amen on the bacon....
    XL BGE.  Dallas, Texas.
  • Absolutely going to pull sooner. Probably forget about the sear. Regular height or raised grid though?
    Clarendon Hills, IL
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,341
    You could go either way.  Watch that internal temp and keep in mind you get a bigger rise the hotter you cook.  Consider wrapping that sucker with bacon - tenderloins are lean and bacon really works well with them (and this is coming from a guy that rarely ever uses bacon on bbq).  If you do use bacon, consider cooking it indirect (at least until most of the fat renders off) so you can catch the fat.
    ______________________________________________
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    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Hey Bob, doing the same thing on Xmas night with my new egg that I am getting.  I posted a similar request in the beef section (how to cook an Chateaubriand)?  I am definitely going to sear mine because we like the outside to be crusty, so we shall see how that works out.  Good Luck!
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