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Shun knife set - good deal?

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Comments

  • FockerFocker Posts: 1,628
    Thanks.  May be x-mas or income tax time and I will be ordering.  Since you took the green and black, Hawkeye is for Iowa, so that is out.  Frosty is too loud.  Leaves me with red and black. :))
    "Our houses are protected by the Good Lord and a gun.
     And you might meet 'em both if you show up here not welcome son."--Josh Thompson

    Brandon
    Quad Cities


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  • MikeGMikeG Posts: 174

    You guys talking your Shun luv need to have realistic sharpening strategies in mind if this thinness & hardness is new to you.  

    Shun's vg-10 is a chip prone steel and won't respond well to burr straightening on a grooved steel as do the Wustoffs, Victorinox, Henckle's etc.  When stoned by beginners it does tend to produce a stubborn wire edge that will feel razor sharp at first but then not so much after the wire rolls over in use.  Good jap water stones and some time invested in watching (some) youtube sharpening videos will give the desired results.

    If you really want to understand kitchen knives go to cheftalk.com forum and research BDL's posts over the years.   It's a great free education if you are serious about moving beyond $30 knives.

     

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  • I'm a little late to the discussion, so I apologize if I'm at all repetitious, but I am a knife collector.  Not kitchen knives, but hand forged hunting knives, swords, etc.  Traditional Damascus blades are made of alternating layers of high and low carbon steel.  As such they take on the strengths, and minimize the weaknesses of both metals combining hardness and flexibility.  Damascus was used often to make swords, for that reason.  For some time, it was touted as being a miracle steel.  When they are sharpened, the etching that occurs creates a microscopic serrated edge that is very durable.  Stainless does not provide the same qualities as true Damascus.  It only looks good.  (Just my two cents.)
    Brighton, IL (North East of St. Louis, MO)
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,415
    MikeG said:

    You guys talking your Shun luv need to have realistic sharpening strategies in mind if this thinness & hardness is new to you.  

    Shun's vg-10 is a chip prone steel and won't respond well to burr straightening on a grooved steel as do the Wustoffs, Victorinox, Henckle's etc.  When stoned by beginners it does tend to produce a stubborn wire edge that will feel razor sharp at first but then not so much after the wire rolls over in use.  Good jap water stones and some time invested in watching (some) youtube sharpening videos will give the desired results.

    If you really want to understand kitchen knives go to cheftalk.com forum and research BDL's posts over the years.   It's a great free education if you are serious about moving beyond $30 knives.

     

    Good advice.  I have the sharpening covered.  My wet wheel doesn't care if it's a CPM alloy or carbon steel.
    image
    tormek.jpg
    800 x 480 - 81K
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • Fishlessman,

    Do you steel it? I wouldn't even touch the damn thing. I can see my fingertips lying on the counter the first cut.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,392
    havent had to touch the leech yet. most of my knives are single bevel with japanese stainless or the japanese stainless with very tight bevel angles, i dont use a steel on them, i think a steel would do damage to them. i do have a diamond stone thats maybe 1500 grit 3 by 14 inches and a couple swipes with most knives puts them back on track, i have water stones down to 12000 grit or so but those are for razors, way overkill for a kitchen knife. the leech hasnt seen a stone yet
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  • Sorry, I said steel but I meant a ceramic "steel"

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,415
    The leech steel:

    "The blade is made from a specially designed high carbon/semi-stainless alloy steel. The steel is then hardened and tempered to Don's specifications. Each blade is signed and dated as well as marked with an "SS" that signifies Don Canney's "SUPER STEEL"."

    It doesn't sound like your usual alloy.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • high carbon/semi-stainless alloy steel. Sounds like Jumbo Shrimp to me

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,415

    high carbon/semi-stainless alloy steel. Sounds like Jumbo Shrimp to me

    Basically that means the chromium content is under 13%. I doubt it's really high carbon - it would be brittle.  Probably call it high carbon because the blade is thin and the carbon was added though the hardening process.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • Focker, I have a 6" Shun Hiro Santoku blade I use for all my veg. and I have a 8" Shun Reserve for my reg. blade. Before I was able to spoil myself, I cooked with Wustof due to the feel of the handle. Hankle's have that sharp edge that cut into my hand. I no longer cook for living so the rest of my blades I don't use very often. 
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  • high carbon/semi-stainless alloy steel. Sounds like Jumbo Shrimp to me

    Basically that means the chromium content is under 13%. I doubt it's really high carbon - it would be brittle.  Probably call it high carbon because the blade is thin and the carbon was added though the hardening process.
    Chromium content? High carbon? Shuns are made of Damascus steel composed of 32-56 alternating layers of nickel and stainless steel. This is why they keep their edge and are easily sharpened.....
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,415
    We were talking about the leech.  The Shuns hold their edge because the core is VG10.  The "Damascus" layers mostly look purdy - they don't do any cutting.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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