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Is reverse better for tri tip ?

  Do you feel the reverse sear produces a better tri tip than the trex method ? I have always used trex , but always looking to improve.

Comments

  • Hi54puttyHi54putty Posts: 1,401
    In my opinion, I feel like there is the potential to lose control of the internal temp by searing at the end. You have total control by searing and then roasting to desired finish temp.

    I know a lot of people sear at end, I don't want another opportunity to mess it up.
  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,212
    I agree, in a matter of seconds you can take it a level of doneness that can't be stopped. I am a big fan of trex plus you can season post sear and not burn the seasoning durning the sear.
  • Sounds like I haven't missed anything by not trying the reverse sear.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    So what you're saying is, the meat "absorbs" heat way more (and uncontrollably) faster if it's already mostly cooked.... 

    Look, you need to learn how much rise you get from a sear.  It's more or less the same if you do it when you start (trex) cooking or at the end (reverse sear).  You have less opportunity to accidentally overcook meat if you sear to start, but there are advantages to reverse sear if you have the tenacity to reliably pull it off. 

    The reverse sear - the meat surface is drier - you get less evaporation and more maillard reaction, and less total heat added.  So less rise, but you're riding a razor's edge.  You need to know how much that meat will rise with your sear so you don't overcook.  The lovely roasted taste is fresher on a reverse sear, and the pre-sear cook gets more smoke.  Them is good thangs.

    All and all, I think too much is made of all this.  Just throw your steak on and cook it the way you want.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 6,271
    I can see your point nola. I do think learning what temp changes occur during a sear can only help one down the road. That will only be ballpark though as there are a ton of variables as every piece of meat has its own character.

    I've seared 1st on all my tri tips and have always had outstanding results. Don't fix it if aint broken! :P
    Just a hack that makes some shitty BBQ...
  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 1,598
    edited December 2012
    I prefer to reverse sear as I find it provides a more uniform level of doneness than when searing first. In other words, I find a med rare tri-tip reverse seared will have a larger pink area than a seared first tri-tip. I do the same with thick steaks.

    As pointed out by others, the risk is overshooting your target temp. Once you get used to consistently cooking at a certain temp (I usually cook mine in the 275-325 range) to a set pre-sear temp (about 115 for me) and how long to sear (1 min/side for me) at a given temp (550-625 for me) you can turn them out how you like consistently.

    IMO, the reward is worth the risk (at least for my tastes). I know folks who don't sear their tri-tips at all so to each their own.
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs
    Bay Area, CA
  • I feel the best way to bring some of the charred flavored crust "to the plate" is by doing it on the back end.

    I do like the contrast of charred crust and the internal red meat in each bite.

    On nice thick steaks, I do an extended sear (3/4 min a side) and pull to rest for a med rare result. 

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

  • Hi54puttyHi54putty Posts: 1,401
    So what you're saying is, the meat "absorbs" heat way more (and uncontrollably) faster if it's already mostly cooked.... 

    If you were referring to my post, that's not at all what I'm saying. I don't think it "absorbs" heat more quickly or in a less controllable manner. I just think it adds a variable that I (a much less seasoned cook than you appear to be) would rather eliminate.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    Hi54putty said:
    So what you're saying is, the meat "absorbs" heat way more (and uncontrollably) faster if it's already mostly cooked.... 

    If you were referring to my post, that's not at all what I'm saying. I don't think it "absorbs" heat more quickly or in a less controllable manner. I just think it adds a variable that I (a much less seasoned cook than you appear to be) would rather eliminate.
    Sorry, I was just being a wiener.  The TRex method is proven, and you do have more control over the final internal temp the lower you cook it at the end.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,886
    edited December 2012
    For me on a 2" steak, when I Trex followed by a slower cook, the outside 1/4-1/2" of the steak is overdone, even though the center is perfect, medium rare. I've tried different Trex times, but the results are hit and miss. Some folks do this very well, I just seem to be an idiot with it. 

    I refer to reverse sear as the poor man's sous vide, I know it is not - it's just the result is, to me, similar. A 2" room temp fully seasoned steak cooked indirect at 225 and allowed to slowly rise to 115-125 (7 to degrees below the final desired temp) then reverse seared gives me the best result. If you cut into a slow cooked steak, before the sear, the color is remarkably consistent, edge to edge as is the temp. I then sear for color and crust. 
    SWMBO likes medium well, so I let hers "slow cook" until an internal of 135 or so, put it on 5-10 minutes early. Works for me. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Does the initial low temp cook have to be indirect , or will raised direct work as well ?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    fairchase said:
    Does the initial low temp cook have to be indirect , or will raised direct work as well ?
    That works fine too.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Hi54puttyHi54putty Posts: 1,401
     
    Sorry, I was just being a wiener.  The TRex method is proven, and you do have more control over the final internal temp the lower you cook it at the end.
    no worries
  • fairchase said:
    Does the initial low temp cook have to be indirect , or will raised direct work as well ?
    Like Nola says, either direct or indirect will work. I put my CI grid on fire ring, some tile spacers, then the setter, drip pan and SS grid. I do indirect and when ready, pull the SS grid, drip pan and setter (setter is easier to get off the CI grid with the tile strips) The Ci grid is hot, it has been right over the burnng lump and there is a lot of reflection from the setter. Get some air flowing and ready to sear. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    I dreamed up a hair-brained idea the other day.  Pull from the sous vide, then throw the bag in some ice water for (time to be determined - maybe 30 seconds).  Theoretically, that should cool down the outside layer of the food, ideally by the same amount of heat I'm adding in a sear.  Not much of an extra step - maybe just regular tepid water would work.  I don't have much of a problem with the rise, but a rise is a rise.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • No offense Nola but I'm kinda wishing you would STFU about sous vide for the next three weeks ;)

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    Seriously - you have to wait UNTIL Christmas before you can use it?!  GTFOH!
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • I did one yeaterday and didn't sear at all.  Cooked it like a roast indirect with a handful of whiskey barrel chips at grid 135 and pulled at 124 internal.  Came out great.  Grid temp was hot enough for a good Mailard reaction and it looked good.  No sear necessary for that one.  Ran it through the slicer today for sammies and cold cuts.

    My actuary says I'm dead.
  • I don't even know if she has it yet. I spent half the day looking at methods and information about it. I am so pumped. I might even have to pull the medium egg out of the garage as a searing unit. Get a big round of steel cut to fit inside

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    hahahah  Steve, I was planning on posting a 21 part series called "Sous Vide is F**king Dark Magic", where I explore the intricacies of the technique on Ethiopian fermented flat breads.  I'll do ya a favor man and hold off on that project until the new year.
    :-j
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Can you do dosa? My little buddy is selling out and I have become so used to the food. I was thinking about lamb and goat in SV.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    I'm made dosa before but I cheated and bought the mix at the International Market - a cool warehouse store in Metairie run by and Paki family that sells and wholesales imported food from everywhere.  I think I have more in the pantry, I need to look.  Miss B has a photographic memory for expiration dates so the mix might be thrown out by now.  Lamb - that sounds good...

    http://www.cuisinetechnology.com/blog/recipe-sous-vide/sous-vide-leg-of-lamb-tomato-confit-cucumbers-harissa-and-homemade-yogurt/
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,886
    edited December 2012
    I dreamed up a hair-brained idea the other day.  Pull from the sous vide, then throw the bag in some ice water for (time to be determined - maybe 30 seconds).  Theoretically, that should cool down the outside layer of the food, ideally by the same amount of heat I'm adding in a sear.  Not much of an extra step - maybe just regular tepid water would work.  I don't have much of a problem with the rise, but a rise is a rise.
    NOLA - grand plan, LS is one up on you, this time of year he doesn't need to worry about an ice bath, all he has to do is take the long way around the house to the egg, by the time he gets there the outside may have a touch of frost...
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,550
    He's got the advantage for the next 5 months or so.  It was in the low 70s here today, rainy with 78% humidity.  I'll take that and an ice bath please.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • TO set a record high today of 57* F

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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