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tri tip?

Ok...stupid question. What's a tri tip? What's it comparable to? Good cut or not? Thanks
Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 

Comments

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 5,491
    I look at it as a cross between a sirloin and a brisket. I cook it just like a steak but season it and cut it like I would a brisket.

    It's very very popular in Cali and is now starting to be readily available...at least in Texas.

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  • Better flavor than a brisket IMO.

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

  • KoskoKosko Posts: 533
    If you cook it just like your steaks, then how do you cook your steaks? Cause that thing looks sweeeeet!
    Peachtree City, Ga Large BGE
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019

    Kosko said:
    If you cook it just like your steaks, then how do you cook your steaks? Cause that thing looks sweeeeet!
    There are lots of techniques to cooking them.  But you cook them to 125-135 internal, depending on how you like your steaks done, rather than cooking like a brisket or butt at 200F.  If you overcook them, they'll dry out and it'll get tough.  Not as bad a steak would that overcooked, but you won't enjoy it as much.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 5,491
    edited November 2012



    Kosko said:

    If you cook it just like your steaks, then how do you cook your steaks? Cause that thing looks sweeeeet!

    There are lots of techniques to cooking them.  But you cook them to 125-135 internal, depending on how you like your steaks done, rather than cooking like a brisket or butt at 200F.  If you overcook them, they'll dry out and it'll get tough.  Not as bad a steak would that overcooked, but you won't enjoy it as much.


    Exactly! Don't overcook them!

    It's a fine cut so there isn't much fat.


  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,775
    I did my first one this Sunday.  I loved it, and so did my friends and family.  I used the recipe from eggs by the bay.


    I actually managed to overcook it a little...and it was still great.  








    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 10,842
    So cook indirect at 350? Sear our reverse sear?
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • I do sear first, but I doubt it matters..
  • Plano_JJPlano_JJ Posts: 448
    edited November 2012
    For mine, I sear both sides at 600 for 3-4 minutes, take it off and cool the egg down to 350. Put back on and cook 12-15 min per side then take off, put in a pan, and cover with foil for 10 min. This way has been a winner at my house. Crispy ends and pink on the inside. All cooking is done direct. I like the Dizzy Pig Raising the Steaks or Uncle Chris' Steak seasoning. Light coat of olive oil before the seasoning of course. Enjoy. There is a picture of the last one I did in my "New Member" thread.
  • cazzycazzy Posts: 5,491
    edited November 2012
    I sear 1st...using the spider and a cast iron grid. Then I roast raised direct at 400 till I reach the internal temp I desire.

    I never use olive oil as it will burn at searing temps and can leave a pungent taste. Also, I have never seen it to make a difference where as putting a garlic butter ball on the meat during rest actually adds a ton of flavor.

    A lot of peeps are fans of reverse sear and I plan to try it during my next tri tip cook.

  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 1,525
    henapple said:
    So cook indirect at 350? Sear our reverse sear?

    As Nola stated, lots of ways to cook tri-tip: sear & roast, roast then sear, roast & no sear. It is typically cooked either raised direct or indirect on an Egg. My favorite method for cooking them is reverse sear (http://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1143349/tri-tip-tutorial).

    Regardless of cook method, don't overcook them and slice against the grain for the most tender slices.

    It is hard to find outside of CA & a few other states at reasonable prices. If you have a Costco near you they probably carry them. Otherwise, if you can find a butcher that has a North American Meat Producers (NAMP) guide, tri tip is identified as NAMP 185 C & D.
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs
    Bay Area, CA
  • gte1gte1 Posts: 374
    I use the above method almost exactly, I just do the roast raised direct. Red oak, long rest, cut cross grain all lend to a perfect tri tip!!!!
    George
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,775
    The recipe/method I linked above is sear then roast. During the roast you baste with a sauce that is oil/vinegar/garlic. I cooked until 129-130 in the thickest part. It was good and juicy, but not enough pink for my taste. The cuts I were way thicker in the middle than the "tails" so the thinner parts were naturally much more done. Next time I will go 125 or lower.


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 320

    I agree completely with SmokeyPitt. In my opinion, it's always best to err on the side of rare when it comes to tri tip. Pull it around 125-130 and let it rest under foil for about 15-20 min.

    Tri Tip is one of the easier cooks I've done, and most rewarding. It's fairly quick, extremely flavorful, and if you can find it at your local butcher, it's not that expensive. (if I remember correctly, I paid about 18 bucks for a 3 lb tri tip)  Cut it thin for sandwiches, or serve it with fresh flour tortillas. 

    Let us know how it turns out! 

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • Did 1st tri-tip last night w Eggs by the Bay recipe, as suggested by SmokeyPitt, and it came out fantastic. I pulled at 126 (as per recipe for medium rare). Left my Maverick probe in for 15 minutes of rest under foil. The temp peaked at 141 and was initially nervous treat I had overcooked it. Fortunately the thick end was a perfect reddish medium rare and thin tip was more medium well (but only the first slice or two). Next time I'd pull a degree or two earlier, but that's just splitting hairs. Rub was quite good, but a bit apicy for one or two people others, myself included, loved it. I'll definitely make this again! Recipe: http://eggsbythebay.com/Recipes.html
  • Try jamming fresh garlic spears into the tri tip a while before cooking.
  • gte1gte1 Posts: 374
    Picked one up at Safeway last night $3.99/lb. pulled at 116 after rest it was about medium rare. If you rest 15 min or so they will go up a good 15 degrees especially if you reverse sear as you are throwing lots of heat on them for those last 3 mins.
    George
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