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Stromboli! Pic Heavy.

nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
edited December 2012 in EggHead Forum
Tonight's dinner.  I was inspired by someone's pic on the forum.

Made the dough at lunch.  500g Tipo 00 flour, 325mL water, 10g salt, 3g yeast.


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______________________________________________
This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    edited December 2012
    Tasso, pizza sauce, bresaola, mozzarella, onion, spinach, artichoke.  Egg wash.

    Here's what I learned.  Don't make the so big.  I could barely get the lid closed, and they were too big for my pizza stone, so I had to rig a heat shield and cook on a rack.  Make the dough thicker on the outside. 

    The Tipo flour can take some serious heat.  I ended up cooking at around 500 after starting the first one around 400.  Probably could have gone up to 550.  The dough inside cooked nicely.  I cooked the first one to 190.  The second I went to 210.   I haven't tried the second one yet.  Looks like we'll be eating stromboli for the next few days....
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • MickeyMickey Posts: 15,240
    Show off :x
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini, just added a Mini Max 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015 http://saladoeggheadgathering.blogspot.com

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    Thanks.  My first time.  It's pretty easy to make, just don't expect the first time to be perfect.  I didn't use no stinkin' recipe.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 6,492
    edited December 2012
    Looks great!  I'll have to do a Stromboli next time...just made the dough for my 1st egged pie.

    It appears I used the same recipe you did for the dough.  Question, did you follow the recipe that the egghead posted or did you follow the recipe in the link he posted?  The ingredients are the same but the process from the originator is much different.
    Just a hack that makes some shitty BBQ...
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    I used this one:

    Using Antico Molino Caputo Tipo 00 Pizza Flour

    Use Caputo Tipo 00 flour the same way you would use either general purpose, or bread flour, though you will see a number of differences in how it behaves compared with American flours.

    It hydrates very well. You will find yourself adding more water to your dough than you are accustomed. You want to make a moist, almost sticky dough. You can use flour to keep it from sticking to your hands or your work surface.

    It is very silky and soft. You can make great pizza dough without adding olive oil. Experiment with added olive oil, but definitely try it without. If you are used to throwing your pizzas, you will see that the dough needs gentle handling.

    It is very extensible. The flour is selected and milled to be easily shaped into a pizza base. You should not over work the dough. It will spring in the oven. The soft, well-hydrated, extensible dough will puff around the outside rim of the pizza where you do not have sauce.

    And the taste is great.

    Basic Vera Pizza Napoletana Dough Recipe

    Ingredients By Volume

    • • •

    500gr Molino Caputo Tipo 00 flour 325 gr water (65% hydration)
    10 gr salt
    3 gr dry active yeast

    4 cups Molino Caputo Tipo 00 flour 1 1⁄2 cups, plus 2-3 Tbs water
    2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp dry active yeast





    By Weight

    We highly recommend cooking by weight. It is fast, and easy to get the exact hydration (water to flour ratio) and dough ball size you want. Personally, I do not use recipes or a mixing cup when I cook dinner for the family, but pizza and bread dough are different. Being exact counts, and nothing works better than a digital scale.

    Mix the dough in a stand mixer, by hand or in a bread machine. If you are using a stand mixer, mix it slowly for two minutes, until you have made a ball. Let the dough rest for 10 minutes, to allow the flour to absorb the water. Then, mix at a middle speed (3 or 4 on a KitchenAid) for 5 minutes, and slow for 2 minutes.

    Shape the dough into a ball, place it in a slightly oiled bowl, cover it with a towel, and let it rise for 1 1/2 - 2 hours, or until double. Punch it down and push out the air bubbles. Form the dough into a large ball, then cut it into 4-5 equal pieces.

    To make your pizza balls, shape each piece of dough into a ball. Gently shape your dough into a ball, then stretch the top of the ball down and around the rest of the ball, until the outer layer wraps around the other side. Pinch the two ends together to make a smooth ball with a tight outer "skin." Set your ball seam-side down where it can rest. Dust your pizza balls with flour, and store them under a damp towel, in a proofing tray, or under plastic wrap. This will prevent the outside of the ball from drying out and creating a crust, and becoming difficult to work with. The top of the pizza ball should be soft and silky.

    Your pizza balls will need to rest for about an hour to become soft and elastic, so that they can be easily stretched into a thin crust pizza.

    If you don’t need your pizza balls for a few hours, you should refrigerate them, and bring them back out of the refrigerator an hour or so before you want to use them.

    Try making your pizza balls the day before you need them. Overnight refrigeration helps the dough develop more flavor, and a fully developed dough browns better in your oven.

    Using Caputo Tipo 00 Pizzeria Flour. Copyright 2011. v1.1


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    edited December 2012
    I used a whole KG of flour to make a big batch of dough, then I split it into quarters and froze two of them.  The other two made the stromboli.  I've used this recipe about half a dozen times, makes a very authentic crust in my opinion. 

    I use a Kitchen Aid mixer.  I put the flour in first, then the salt and yeast and mix it dry, then add the water slowly.  Mix for a couple minutes, let it sit for a while, then mix faster, then at the end slow.  Let it rise right in the KA bowl covered with a towel.

    I measure everything out by weight with a kitchen scale.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 6,492
    Here is the post from the creator (James) on the Forno Bravo website.  He has updated as the recipe progressed:

    We have been experimenting with this for some time, and I think we are ready to offer a standard "by weight" recipe for Pizza Napoletana dough. One thing that is remarkable is how simple it is -- if you start with the right ingredients and use a digital scale, it can be easy and fast. This is an olive oil-free recipe, but in order for it to work, you need to use real Italian Tipo 00 pizza flour.

    How to Read an Italian Flour Label - Forno Bravo Forum: The Wood-Fired Oven Community

    I have started working in grams, as the baker's percent is easy to calculate digitally. If you don't have a digital scale, think about getting one. They aren't expensive (you can on in the FB Store for $40), and a scale will definitely improve you baking. If you don't want to go digital, you can find our Pizza Napoletana recipe (in cups) here:

    http://www.fornobravo.com/PDF/Using-caputo-tipo00.pdf

    That said, I have enjoyed moving from volume (cups) to weight (grams). It is more accurate and it's fast. It can also be consistently replicated -- which unlike most home recipes, it very important.

    Here goes:

    500 grams Caputo Tipo 00 pizza flour
    325 grams water (65% hydration)
    10 grams salt
    3 grams active dry yeast

    First, mix the flour and water, and let it rest for about 20 minutes. Using a stand mixer set a low speed (use #2 for a minute or two, go to #4, then back to #2 with a KitchenAid mixer), blend the water and flour until you have reached a dough ball. It should take a couple of minutes. Once you have incorporated all of the flour, stop, and let everything rest for 20 minutes. This period will allow the flour to fully absorb the water.

    Next, add the salt and yeast, and knead the dough for 10 minutes.

    Then, make a large dough ball, and let the dough rest at room temperature for 90 minutes. It should have doubled.

    Then, cut the dough into four balls (about 215g each). Shape the pizza balls, and set them on a floured surface to rest for at least 30 minutes. If you start in the morning or the night before, make your dough balls in advance and put them in the refrigerator.

    If you use Caputo Tipo 00 flour and the moist (65% hydrated) recipe, and you handle your dough gently, you will reward you with a supple, silkly pizza base that is easy to shape, springs in the oven, and tastes great.
    James
    Just a hack that makes some shitty BBQ...
  • cazzycazzy Posts: 6,492
    Note the part in orange.  The one that you followed, did you just add all the ingredients and mix your dough?  The one I used tonight called for you to mix the water and flour, then let it absorb for 20 minutes.  Then, add yeast and salt.

    Just a hack that makes some shitty BBQ...
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    I'll have to try that and see if there's any difference.  Thanks.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    I put the flour in first, then the salt and yeast and mix it dry, then add the water slowly.  Mix for a couple minutes, let it sit for a while, then mix faster, then at the end slow.  Let it rise right in the KA bowl covered with a towel.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 6,492
    I used a whole KG of flour to make a big batch of dough, then I split it into quarters and froze two of them.  The other two made the stromboli.  I've used this recipe about half a dozen times, makes a very authentic crust in my opinion. 

    I use a Kitchen Aid mixer.  I put the flour in first, then the salt and yeast and mix it dry, then add the water slowly.  Mix for a couple minutes, let it sit for a while, then mix faster, then at the end slow.  Let it rise right in the KA bowl covered with a towel.

    I measure everything out by weight with a kitchen scale.
    Ok, that answered my question.  I'll do it your way next time.  Sounds a lil easier which I like.
    Just a hack that makes some shitty BBQ...
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    edited December 2012
    It's a great dough, takes no work at all to stretch out by hand.  It can take some serious heat - this dough likes a HOT egg.  Doesn't seem to brown.  Goes from bone white to dark.  Oil or egg wash will help with the color.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 6,492
    It's a great dough, takes no work at all to stretch out by hand.  It can take some serious heat - this dough likes a HOT egg.  Doesn't seem to brown.  Goes from bone white to dark.  Oil or egg wash will help with the color.
    Thanks for the tips.  After seeing your nom noms, I want pizza now.  lol


    Just a hack that makes some shitty BBQ...
  • That's a great looking crust, Nola !  We  took a one day cooking class in Serrano, Italy, and they recommended using at least half "Italian flour" in the dough for pizza.  I'm sure they were talking about the Tipo 00 flour.

    Lots of good info in this thread.  I'm bookmarking it.  Thanks.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • tulocaytulocay Posts: 1,591
    Good looking dough!
    LBGE, Marietta, GA
  • jfm0830jfm0830 Posts: 901
    Outstanding! Looks wonderful.

  • Bookmarked, Looks awesome! Definitely on my to do list
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • Marvelous, simply marvelous. You have given me a idea on how to improve last nights veggie pizza, thanks
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,202
    Just ate leftover stromboli for breakfast - excellent the next day!
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Dyal_SCDyal_SC Posts: 1,960
    That. is. AWESOME! =P~
    2014 Co-Wing King
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