Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

The consequence of good home cooking with the egg

Good home cooking on the egg has practically ruined dining out.  Don't get me wrong, there is occasional moment where I'm impressed/pleased at what's put before me at a restaurant.  Based on the photos I see on this forum I imagine I'm not alone.  Why go out and pay big money to be unimpressed when I can use fresh ingredients and make something truly tasty on my BGE!?
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Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    I second that, and there's no place like home. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • You are not alone. We recently were delighted to find a steakhouse in our "new-ish" neighborhood, and we booked our anniversary dinner there.

    The steak was d*mn near inedible. A $28 disappointment.  I suspect that we'll be continuing the trend to eat meat at home as a result.  :-)
  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,947
    edited November 2012
    You can still get an excellent steak at a super high end restaurant, where they've dry aged the prime grade meat themselves.  But, you're going to pay through the nose for it.  I'm not talking Outback or Saltgrass; I'm talking Sullivan's, Brennan's, or Ruggles (in Houston).

    So, yes, home cooking is the way to go.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    edited November 2012
    You can still get an excellent steak at a super high end restaurant, where they've dry aged the prime grade meat themselves.  But, you're going to pay through the nose for it.  I'm not talking Outback or Saltgrass; I'm talking Sullivan's, Brennan's, or Ruggles (in Houston).

    So, yes, home cooking is the way to go.
    Have you tried dry aging using the drybags?  I keep telling myself to buy some, at least for the charcuterie.  http://www.drybagsteak.com/
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • You can still get an excellent steak at a super high end restaurant, where they've dry aged the prime grade meat themselves.  But, you're going to pay through the nose for it.  I'm not talking Outback or Saltgrass; I'm talking Sullivan's, Brennan's, or Ruggles (in Houston).

    So, yes, home cooking is the way to go.
    Have you tried dry aging using the drybags?  I keep telling myself to buy some, at least for the charcuterie.  http://www.drybagsteak.com/
    No, not drybags.  I did buy 3 prime grade ribeye steaks, wrapped them in cheese cloth, and put them in the refrigerator on a rack and made sure the temperature was between 32 and 38.  After 4 days, I cooked one and it was very good, but I'm not sure the dry aging did it any more than the prime rating it had anyway.  I left the other two in the fridge for 3 weeks, and had to throw them out because they were as hard as a rock.  I think I petrified them.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    Stike would have eaten them. 
    >:)
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • I think I made prime jerky.  I should have sliced it and put it in my backpack.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • You can still get an excellent steak at a super high end restaurant, where they've dry aged the prime grade meat themselves.  But, you're going to pay through the nose for it.  I'm not talking Outback or Saltgrass; I'm talking Sullivan's, Brennan's, or Ruggles (in Houston).

    So, yes, home cooking is the way to go.
    Dude, where did I say we went to Outback? The place we went IS supposed to be a high-end restaurant, with specific grades of steak, and all the "hand rubbed", aged meat claims on the menu. It still sucked.

    We paid $28 for my top sirloin, and $34 for filet mignon for DH, and both were a disappointment.
  • Sorry Dudess.  I was not referring to your misfortunate experience.  I was actually trying to agree with Stargaze, and you weren't part of my post.  Lighten up.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • It's made me a lot pickier, that's for sure.

    I Don't think VI was saying you went to Outback. I think he was just saying you can still get good steaks out there but you are going to have to go to a spot like you went

    I'm with you though. Less and less of those places get it done for me. It's got to be special to make me happy



  • My consequence is weight gain. My nickname at work now is John, as in John Candy. At least its not Candy or Ox or Uncle Buck.

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 10,365



    You can still get an excellent steak at a super high end restaurant, where they've dry aged the prime grade meat themselves.  But, you're going to pay through the nose for it.  I'm not talking Outback or Saltgrass; I'm talking Sullivan's, Brennan's, or Ruggles (in Houston).

    So, yes, home cooking is the way to go.

    Have you tried dry aging using the drybags?  I keep telling myself to buy some, at least for the charcuterie.  http://www.drybagsteak.com/



    Drybag was my ex-wife's nickname.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    We still go out to eat, as there are many, many restaurants that are excellent in New Orleans.

    A foodie favorite:  http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/americas-best-cities-for-foodies/2

    However, we changed our ordering habits - where we used to order grilled stuff, we tend to order more technical food - meals that are difficult to prepare at home, dishes that you take one look at the recipe and say "hellll no".
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • Nola - Eating out is always fun, we like you, tend to go out for the stuff we don't do at home. Lately, we have made less trips to the local eateries, and there are some good ones. The cost of a meal and a good wine in Vancouver area restaurants is ridiculous, and the results are often hit and miss. 

    I spend much more time now looking for a good butcher, talking with him/her to get the best cut of meat I can, then bringing it home and burning some lump. The worst mistake I've ever made with my cooking is not half as bad as the disasters I paid top dollar for in some restaurant. Now if I do screw up the cook, at least I'm at home, no need to drive and I can drown my sorrows and forget my embarrassment. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,544
    edited November 2012
    I definitely know what you mean.  I too sometimes find myself saying "I could have made this at home for much less money".  I do still enjoy eating out.  Sometimes its nice to pay extra for someone else to do the prep and the clean up.  It also keeps the boss happy because...lets face it..she does all the clean up ;)

    It seems to bother me worse when I go to a more expensive restaurant.  The steak house is a good example... I went to Ruth Chris a couple of years ago and I was completely unimpressed with my filet and left with the feeling "I paid how much for that??".  The other thing that get's me is the pricier the restaurant...the pricier the drinks.  So, on top of the overpriced steak you pay $60 for a $12 bottle of wine.  

    When I go to my favorite Mexican place and order 2 fish tacos for around $6 and a 32 oz Dos XXX for $3 I don't feel remorse.


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    screw Ruth Chris.  Yeah, they buy top-notch meat, then cook it on the stove.  Garlic butter.  Sure, it's good if you're into lighting your cigar with a 100 dollar bill, but you can do much better with the same cut.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • henapple said:
    You can still get an excellent steak at a super high end restaurant, where they've dry aged the prime grade meat themselves.  But, you're going to pay through the nose for it.  I'm not talking Outback or Saltgrass; I'm talking Sullivan's, Brennan's, or Ruggles (in Houston).

    So, yes, home cooking is the way to go.
    Have you tried dry aging using the drybags?  I keep telling myself to buy some, at least for the charcuterie.  http://www.drybagsteak.com/

    Drybag was my ex-wife's nickname.

    =))

    Freaking awesome

  • Stargaze said:
    Good home cooking on the egg has practically ruined dining out.  Don't get me wrong, there is occasional moment where I'm impressed/pleased at what's put before me at a restaurant.  Based on the photos I see on this forum I imagine I'm not alone.  Why go out and pay big money to be unimpressed when I can use fresh ingredients and make something truly tasty on my BGE!?
    When people balk about the price of the egg I always say zero out your restaurant, take out and delivery accounts. I live in the country, close to a small town with a few decent restaurants but hardly ever go out. Rather invite friends over and cook stuff of the same or better caliber

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     


  • When I go to my favorite Mexican place and order 2 fish tacos for around $6 and a 32 oz Dos XXX for $3 I don't feel remorse.
    Exactly! We eat lunch at the odd roadhouse or pub, pub grub is like Holiday Inn, no surprises, not great, not bad. Have a place we go to with a Blues Burger, for $8, big chunk of blue cheese, frizzled onions lettuce and tomato, hand cut fries and a 20oz Blue Moon for $4. I have to drive home quickly or my afternoon nap starts when I'm still behind the wheel. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • misumisu Posts: 212
    edited November 2012
    I don't eat out much either but the difference is we weren't eating out much before the eggs. We grew up with home made food and normal restaurants just don't impress me. I remember a few years ago the guys at work had to pick something for lunch and run it by me first and they knew fast food chains were out of question :) I eat leftover egg food for lunch now.
  • Skiddy,

    I go to an Indian place three times a week at least if I don't take leftovers. Full buffet with naan, dosa and paratha. $6.99. You can't get a sammy from Tim's for that and the owner does a truly authentic job. That is about it for me and restaurants.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • I tell people the same thing daily. The better I get on my egg the more reastruants that get eliminated.
  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,338
    I skip most of the other restaurants a lot now, but have, still and will continue to hit my favorite sushi place once a week.   ;)
    _____________________________________________
     
    I Know Why The Egged Bird Sings.
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • jfm0830jfm0830 Posts: 873
    Same experience here. The thing is I would still like to go out to eat just to get a break from cooking and let someone wait on me. The problem is if I go out it will be alone. My wife now refuses to pay for something she feels I can do better. It has only gotten worse now that I've gotten the Egg and am making things I never grilled before. 
    BBQ Website: grillin' & smokin'

    Middlesex County, MA
    Two Large BGE's & Too Many Eggcessories to Count
  • The inspiration of this thread was the fact that I'm out of town with my son, he mentioned about going to Chili's which is right down from where we're staying [Philadelphia].  My spidey sense went off [you're going to be disappointed].

    "Sure son let's give it a go". 

    I ordered the chicken fajitas.  15 minutes later I got a skillet of greasy onions and peppers underneath a pile of cut up chicken breast.   The chicken breast was made to look like it had been grilled over and open fire but I knew better.  I'm not sure that someone wasn't tattooing the griddle lines on the chicken in the back.


  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,121
    I'm a lot pickier when it comes to going out to eat now-a-days. Stuff I can't/haven't tried making at home. Good cheap mexican food (cost to eat out less then the hassle of me doing it, plus better margaritas). Sushi. And sometimes its just nice to not have to cook and let others do it, although I am selective on the menu. I never order anything grilled at a restaurant.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

     

  • The rare times we've been out to eat post-egg, I'll usually order something I'm thinking about making and see what I'd do different.

    Damascus, VA.  Friendliest town on the Appalachian Trail.

    LBGE Aug 2012, SBGE Feb 2014

  • BYS1981BYS1981 Posts: 1,470
    I still eat out occasionally, but not nearly as much for several reasons the egg and going to a restaurant with two children under the age of 4 is not my idea of a good meal lol!

    I don't do BBQ places often because here in CA I haven't found a good one that I really like, but I still go to Indian/middle eastern, sushi (really good place in Concord for the Bay Area folks, http://www.yelp.com/biz/sushi-momoyama-concord-2 ), Mexican - while I can do tacos and stuff I cannot make real Mexican food nearly as good as I wish, dimsum, etc.

    I cook a lot outside of just the egg, so when I go out I am pretty much looking for a meal I know I can't make - when I was younger I'd do fettucini alfredo A LOT, now I know it is cream, butter, and cheese lol!!!!
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,121
    @BYS1981 try the Pioneer Woman's fettucini alfredo recipe. Super easy and good.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

     

  • robnybbqrobnybbq Posts: 1,466
    edited November 2012
    I wish we would stop eating out.  I can cook the meats good on the egg but the sauces/sides are blah.  I need to learn to cook a full meal.  Problem is my wife does not like 90% of fish and limited vegetables so I dont have a clue on what to make.  I went to the DR's as well yesterday and that is another story/train wreck.  I need to make healthier food NOW.  I need to limit the FAT which is in EVERYTHING.  My other issue is WINTER (Explicit Four Letter Word).  I hate the cold.  The egg is downstairs out in a yard not making it easy to use as I will not have in on the wooden deck next to the kitchen (afraid of fire).  I did it for Thanksgiving and it was a PITA cooking in the cold and dark.  And there is no such thing as quick weeknight cooks on the Egg.  Every cook is an event of getting the food.  Cooking it for a few hours. During the week that is no good when I get home at 7:00.  If I wanted to use the egg during the week means we are not eating until 8:30-10:00 between food prep, lighting the egg, 1/2 hour+  burn off/warm up, then the cook.  Enough Ranting - Dr kicked my but again.



    _______________________________________________________________
    LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


    Garnerville, NY
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