Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
It’s that time of year again-time to hop on out to your backyard for an EGG hunt. If you’re lucky, you’ll only have to search as far as your patio! Planning on cooking Easter Sunday? Check out our Easter Menu. If you’re looking for a sweet treat to enjoy with the whole family, try at least one of our sweet treats, if not both: Grilled Peeps & Carrot Cupcakes. Lastly, if you’re having company, our Pinterest page has lots of ideas for entertaining. We hope you have an EGGstra tasty holiday!



The Big Green Egg headquarters has moved - come visit our new location and check out the museum! 3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340

For you briners.....

Made my second brine tonight. I could not remember what I did with my first one, so I winged it.  It tasted pretty good when cooled, I just hope it is good for the bird!
  • Just shy of a cup of kosher salt
  • a cup pf light brown sugar loosely packed
  • tablespoon of rosemary leaves
  • teaspoon of thyme
  • 7-8 garlic cloves quartered
  • 3/4 lemon squeezed then cut up and dumped in
  • 8-10 whole peppercorns
  • a carrot cut up
  • a stalk of celery
  • half a sweet onion
I had all that put in 1/2 gallon of water, then barely simmered for about 2 mins, then turned off the heat. Let sit covered for 15 mins, then dumped in a 1/2 gallon of ice water with as much ice as I could fit into the 1/2 container as possible. That made the perfect amount of brine for the 17.4 lb bird.

I hope that I put in the right amount of salt and since I am letting it sit for 24 hrs, for the right amount of time.

I am less interested in the individual ingredients, but rather the brine strength and length of soak. It is either a 12 hr soak or a 24 hr soak as I work 12 hour days.

Thoughts/opinions? Any and all are welcome!
Burning lump in Downingtown, PA
or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
....just look for the smoke!
·

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,808
    Sounds right - I always use a scale to make brine, for the salt.  Depending on the granularity of the salt, you can be off in weight (which is what matters) by a lot. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

    ·
  • Learned a good lesson on brining tonight. Make sure your brine bag doesn't have any weak spots. While moving the bag the bottom blew out and 13 pounds of turkey and a gallon and a half of turkey juice exploded in the kitchen. While I let loose with quite a few expletives, my daughter naturally jumped up and took some pics which immediately made it out on Facebook, twitter, etc. All was good though. Had a backup bag and turkey on its way.
    Clarendon Hills, IL
    ·
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,808
    That's hilarious.  Sorry about the schadenfreude.  :D
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

    ·
  • cazzycazzy Posts: 7,142
    edited November 2012
    Sounds right - I always use a scale to make brine, for the salt.  Depending on the granularity of the salt, you can be off in weight (which is what matters) by a lot. 
    I've seen several recipes with 2 cups salt & sugar as the base ingredients.  Franklin's "Turkey Part " lists that too.  How does one determine exactly how much salt to use.  My bird was 19.5 #...how much salt should have been used?
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ...
    ·
  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,249
    its more salt to water than salt to weight of object being brined.  i'm not all science nerdy with scales and stuff but most brines do 1 cup kosher salt to 1 gallon liquid. and then use enough liquid to fully submerge your food.  thats the rule I have been using for about 5 years then I just adjust all the other ingredients accordingly.  also,  like nola said granularity varies, a cup of kosher salt is way less than a cup of standard table salt. 
    cazzy said:
    Sounds right - I always use a scale to make brine, for the salt.  Depending on the granularity of the salt, you can be off in weight (which is what matters) by a lot. 
    I've seen several recipes with 2 cups salt & sugar as the base ingredients.  Franklin's "Turkey Part " lists that too.  How does one determine exactly how much salt to use.  My bird was 19.5 #...how much salt should have been used?

    ·
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,808
    Here's how I do it.  (how many times have ya heard that?)

    225 g pure salt (pickling salt, brine salt basically pure sodium chloride)
    125g sugar
    1 gallon water.


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

    ·
  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 307
    So it sounds like I might be a little light on the salt to water ratio. I suppose being light is better than too much. Perhaps with a 24 hr soak I am okay. At least that is what I am thinking at the moment.

    Leaving for work in 20 mins, so I am now committed to the 24 hr soak.

    Good luck all! Happy thanksgiving!
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA
    or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    ·
Sign In or Register to comment.