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Length of double table need help?

I am building a table for the xl I am buying. I was thinking of setting it up also for the opportunity to add a medium or large in the future. So let's say I went large and xlarge. Can I build a 8 foot table? I guess I can build anything I want but what I am asking is do I need to have 6 or 8 legs on this thing or will four outer legs be able to do the trick. Was thinking.about 4 x4 posts and framing it with 1 x 6's. I figured that a 22" hole foe the large plus a 27" hole for the xlarge. This totals 49". Then I add say 5" on each side of the eggs to the table edge which bring my measurement to 59". Therefore the amount of space between the eggs is 37" or just over the 3 foot mark. Which should be about the right amount of space when operating both eggs. (the xl bge table plans leave about 28" of workspace for a single cooker) Obviously this would change by a few inches if I decide to go with an xlarge and a medium. Will four legs do the trick.? I would like to avoid putting posts down the middle if possible so I can use the space between the eggs for storage. Therefore if you think 4 legs can't do it for that weight and span, then I would go with either 6 and offset the middle legs around the xl bge basically leaving a five foot span from the center leg to the other side holding the smaller egg which would be plenty of support I'm thinking. Or i could go with 8 legs to make it look symmetrical. This will be on casters. Any help would be greatly appreciated. i have been to the naked whiz's site and seen many designs but most are for large and small. There was one xlarge and medium but I thought the workspace between the two was insufficient. In addition you are kinda guesstimating measurements in these pics based off of egg size etc. Thanks - Michael

Comments

  • you need 8 legs....could use 2x4's for legs....put the middle legs close to the two openings for the eggs and use the long span in the middle for work surface on the top and storage on the bottom 
  • I've always like the V or L design for double eggs. Something that is only in my dreams tho


    _______________________________________________

    LBGE & SBGE (big momma and pat)
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,180
    I have a 7 foot table with a large.  Me and a buddy stood on it when we lowered the egg in - it's strong enough to hold the weight of 3 XLs. 

    If I were building it, I'd just put in 4 legs.  The strength needs to be in the bottom shelf.  The load on the legs is in the long grain direction - wood is insanely strong in that direction.  For the cross grain stress - just double up  on some 2x4s on your 8' span.  Not much different structurally than an 8' span on a floor with joist construction.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • lilwootylilwooty Posts: 181

    The number of legs needed depends on the design.  My table is not quite 7 feet long.  Built for a large and an XL.  Four legs made with 4 x 4 posts.  Double 2 x 6's sistered together front and back provide plenty of support for both units.  The large is on order and has yet to arrive.image

    Living Large and XL

  • I've always like the V or L design for double eggs. Something that is only in my dreams tho

    I do too and they ccan actually save some space but it doesnt fit into my configuration on my patio.  Thats why I need to go long.
  • I have a 7 foot table with a large.  Me and a buddy stood on it when we lowered the egg in - it's strong enough to hold the weight of 3 XLs. 

    If I were building it, I'd just put in 4 legs.  The strength needs to be in the bottom shelf.  The load on the legs is in the long grain direction - wood is insanely strong in that direction.  For the cross grain stress - just double up  on some 2x4s on your 8' span.  Not much different structurally than an 8' span on a floor with joist construction.
    nolaegghead:  Thanks for the input.  I am not a wood craftsman but have dabbled a little.  Not anything like I have seen you do on these forums.  I am sonfused about your grain comments.  I understand grain of the wood.  Are you saying just double up my side to side supports and front to back supports and I should be good?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,180
    edited November 2012
    I'd go as far to say, I'd build a 10' long table and keep it to 4 legs - that is, if you want casters on it.

    Before I'd add two additional center legs, I'd truss the shelf and the top.  Creating a truss in a couple spots will double or treble the load bearing capacity.  Making the truss just involves connecting the top to the shelf in one or more spots.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Truss

    If this is something that you aren't going to move, or you like the way 6 legs look, then by all means, nothing wrong with that.  But from an engineering standpoint, a long span is not a problem if you build it correctly.  Most tables I've seen on this forum are overbuilt by a factor of 4 already.

    4 legs are easy to level, move easily with castors, and I think look better.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • lilwooty said:

    The number of legs needed depends on the design.  My table is not quite 7 feet long.  Built for a large and an XL.  Four legs made with 4 x 4 posts.  Double 2 x 6's sistered together front and back provide plenty of support for both units.  The large is on order and has yet to arrive.image

     

    This is basically what I am going for.  I want to add a bottom shelf for more storage and a door covering the space in the middle, possible drawers in there too.  How wide is the stone inlayed in the top?  Do you think you have enough room there or would ou rather have some extra space.  I know its may be tough to tell at this time cause the large egg is not in yet.

     

    Do you have any pictures on how your 2 X 6 s are sistered and mounted to the posts?  Just so I can get a reference. 

     

    BTW How do you like your XL? I have 7 in my family so I decided to go big and didn't feel like stacking and trying to be resourceful with a large.  BUt I do think that a future large or medium would be helpful for smaller cooks or some sides.  Maybe I am just drinking the forum water.


     

  • lilwootylilwooty Posts: 181

    The top tile is 16 x 22.  Forgive the rough sketch here, I put this together in excel for you.  It is not nowhere near scale.  The red is the basic inside 2 x 6 frame.  The blue are the sistered outside 2 x 6's that are lagged to the inside frame and the green posts.  The whole frame is then bolted all the way through the posts. 

    I absolutely love the XL, but when I am doing a low and slow on that bad boy and get a hankering to grill some burgers or wings at the same time, I feel he needs a little brother.

     

    table frame.jpg
    757 x 389 - 54K

    Living Large and XL

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,132
    If you're doing 2 eggs and have no other work/prep space go long like Jerry Rice. It can't hurt. Use really....really heavy duty casters even if you have to scab the bottom. Through bolt everything you can....they are heavy. Be sure to allow a spacer on your height for air flow. Don't forget...the egg gets hot. Good luck.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • Thanks lilwooty!!! Your diagram helps a lot. I appreciate you putting it together for me. I kinda figured on the two egg thing myself for the same reason. If I have something on for 18 hours or so, how do I feed my family. Plus it may be nice to have something smaller for just a few pieces of chicken or a package of hot dogs for the kids. I like the xl cause we feed 7 routinely and can make larger pizzas, etc. Now I am not sure if I should match my XL up with a large or a medium.
  • Nolaegghead. I am Putting casters on it. Down here in FL we get hurricanes and we need to be able to move things inside. What size casters should I be looking at for an 8 foot table?


    Michael
  • henapple said:
    If you're doing 2 eggs and have no other work/prep space go long like Jerry Rice. It can't hurt. Use really....really heavy duty casters even if you have to scab the bottom. Through bolt everything you can....they are heavy. Be sure to allow a spacer on your height for air flow. Don't forget...the egg gets hot. Good luck.
    Already planning on a table nest. Seems they are probably one of the cheapest eggcessories.  And their benefit is priceless when your house doesn't burn down. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,180
    Nolaegghead. I am Putting casters on it. Down here in FL we get hurricanes and we need to be able to move things inside. What size casters should I be looking at for an 8 foot table?


    Michael
    Hi Michael,

    We in the same boat down here with hurricanes and all dat.  I used these 5" cast iron castors - they're cheap, resist rust and are rated at 330 pounds each - 4 of them and that's over 1300 pounds for you table.  They're big so they roll over stuff easily.  They'll probably last 7 -10 years outside.  Look for the 20% off coupons and sales.  There's a 4" castor that's similar if you want less wheel.  I think the big wheels look and function better.  Mebbe that's just me.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/material-handling/casters-swivel/5-inch-cast-iron-molded-rubber-swivel-caster-38711.html
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • TheEasyLifeTheEasyLife Posts: 66
    edited November 2012

    I have a harbor freight less than a mile from the house..  I'll stop by on the way home and take a look.  I also get some magazines in which they advertise with coupons.

     

    Thanks.

  • Ok now I have another question. 

    The distance between the middle shelf and the top are different depending on what size egg you have. How do I build this without haviing to stack stuff under the xlarge to raise it up? I want the look to be clean. There is a 2.5" difference between the XL and L ? Is it that big of a deal if I raise the large by 2.5 inches in order to keep things on the same shelf?


    Does anyone know the actual height of the eggs?  Especially the XL, L & M.  Maybe raising the L by 2.5" would put the tops closer to the same level.  



    Thanks

    Michael
  • You might want to consider something like this, Michael. I had this table built for two eggs (a medium and a small) and made it convertible so that if I were to sell my small, which I was contemplating at the time, I could place a tile to use as a cutting board in the place of the small.

    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 

    Green egg collage.jpg
    5035 x 2428 - 2M
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,180
    @BGElovr - very nice job!
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Bgelover.....I saw that the other night going through this forum. I thought it was pretty ingenious.

  • I used 4x4's and 2x6's for my single LBGE nearly 60" long with a granite top.  I think you could park a small car on it. 

    Ernie McClain

    Scottsbluff, Nebraska

    (in the extreme western panhandle of NE)

  • I would imagine so. I do agree with Nolaegghead in that it's how it designed. I'm no engineer, so I thought I would ask how an 8 foot table would fair. It's possible. The additional weight of your granite is like adding a second egg.  

    I was thinking about redesigning my table to possibly 6 feet an have an extension on each side. This way it would store easier but then I lose storage space.  Arggg!

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