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Coal and the BGE

I think I know the answer to the question, but I will toss it out there anyway.
Can you use coal in the BGE?
A friend of mine is getting rid of a giant pile of coal that has lived in her basement for a long time-since the days when coal was the go to choice for heating.

Could you mix it with lump to get a higher temp with less lump?
I am guessing it is safe to cook with for my grandads stove/oven was a coal burner.  And what about coal fired pizza ovens?

If not safe for the BGE what about tossing a couple in a camp fire?

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,239
    Coal is solidified crude oil.  Burning coal smells like burning crude - lots of organic chemicals coming off the fire.  It's hard to start and it can burn very hot.  I wouldn't recommend it.  You could contaminate the ceramic.

    In a camp fire - sure.  You can cook over it - keep whatever you're cooking in a pot with a lid or wrapped in foil.

    People have been cooking over coal for centuries.  They still make coal fired pizza ovens, but the flue gas doesn't go over the pizza.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,233
    Everything I've read about coal burning temperature indicates the Egg would melt, or at least have some pretty sever heat warping.

    Burning coal vapors are quite noxious (and usually radioactive), so be sure to have plenty of ventilation. Also a place for the left over "clinkers."
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,948
    i toss a shovel full in the lump to light it from time to time, i have a coal fire burning from november til april in the house. i dont taste the coal at all but it is very sooty lighting it up and you would want it all burning red to cook over it, i say that would be a bad thing to fill an egg and get it burning well enough to cook over it, it takes several hours in my coal stove to get it to temps.
  • One has remember we're cooking food here guys, do things to make food taste better is the idea.

    As bad as it would make your food taste, you would eventually get used to it I guess....the guys using Mesquite say they can't tell their food taste bad after a while.

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

  • IMHO, I would never use an open coal fire to cook food. Coal works in "Grandpa's Oven" because the fire and fumes never touch the food, There is a heat exchanger in the stove, much like an airtight fireplace insert or wood stove. The exhaust gasses do not directly contact the food. In the egg, the exhaust gasses pass over, around and add smoke flavor to what you are going to eat. If you are happy with burning coal, you might just be happy with using briquettes or scrap lumber, heck even pressure treated will work.(just kidding) 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • LootyLooty Posts: 10
    I didn't think coal would be good for the old egg, but wanted to put it out there.  May use it in a campfire when we are not cooking anything,

    Thanks for the knowledge
  • njlnjl Posts: 768
    As bad as it would make your food taste, you would eventually get used to it I guess....the guys using Mesquite say they can't tell their food taste bad after a while.
    :)  So...My wife and I aren't the only ones who hate mesquite flavor on our steaks/burgers?  Even mesquite lump is no good.
  • So...My wife and I aren't the only ones who hate mesquite flavor on our steaks/burgers?  Even mesquite lump is no good.
    NO, You are not alone, Mesquite is to strong a taste for me and my house
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,239
    Some people like liquorice, others don't.  Mesquite is the same way.  The entire population of Texas share that genetic predisposition, apparently.   And it grows there like a weed.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • I like mesquite....I'm from Texas
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,239
    I like mesquite....I'm from Texas
    I rest my case. ;)
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,948
    maybe because ive cooked over coal i can smoke with mesquite
    :D
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,746
    edited November 2012
    So...My wife and I aren't the only ones who hate mesquite flavor on our steaks/burgers?  Even mesquite lump is no good.
    NO, You are not alone, Mesquite is to strong a taste for me and my house
    @nji, I think many folks use too much mesquite then find the result to be too strong. Mesquite is not our favorite, but used in moderation it can add a very distinct and enjoyable taste layer to the cook. Try using mesquite lump in a blend, I find a 20% mesquite/80% RO blend is about as strong as I like, and if using a blend I never add other smoke wood. Try a 10% blend first. Same goes for wood chips/chunks. If your normal smoke wood load is about 1 cup, try 1 or 2 oz of mesquite. In fact 2 oz of mesquite will add as much or more smoke flavour as 8 oz of hickory, IMHO. All that means is that the bag of chips will last 4 times longer. Use it sparingly and you might be surprised. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,948
    So...My wife and I aren't the only ones who hate mesquite flavor on our steaks/burgers?  Even mesquite lump is no good.
    NO, You are not alone, Mesquite is to strong a taste for me and my house
    @nji, I think many folks use too much mesquite then find the result to be too strong. Mesquite is not our favorite, but used in moderation it can add a very distinct and enjoyable taste layer to the cook. Try using mesquite lump in a blend, I find a 20% mesquite/80% RO blend is about as strong as I like, and if using a blend I never add other smoke wood. Try a 10% blend first. Same goes for wood chips/chunks. If your normal smoke wood load is about 1 cup, try 1 or 2 oz of mesquite. In fact 2 oz of mesquite will add as much or more smoke flavour as 8 oz of hickory, IMHO. All that means is that the bag of chips will last 4 times longer. Use it sparingly and you might be surprised. 
    thats how i add it, smaller amounts with 2 parts cherry and 1 part hickory
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,362

    I like mesquite, I'm from Texas and damn proud of it!!

    Nothing like burning mesquite down to pure coals and cooking steak over it.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • Griffin said:

    I like mesquite, I'm from Texas and damn proud of it!!

    Nothing like burning mesquite down to pure coals and cooking steak over it.


    Amen!
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