Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

My 1st Spatch Chicken

I'm giving it a run -my 1st Spatch Chicken!   And, I have read a bunch of posts here from you good folks and think I have a pretty good handle on the set-up, getting it my LBGE, cooking temp, etc. 

I've also read a lot about getting the skin crispy, etc. etc.  Well, that doesn't really apply to me - my family doesn't eat the skin (file that under the category of "Things to know before you marry a woman in the healthcare field!")

So, that's my question:  In that every pic I see has the skin on the bird.......has anyone had any experience in cooking the chicken the BGE without the skin??  Because the Egg retains moisture in the bird so well, I am wondering if the skin is needed (as it might be when you oven roast it)?  I want to season the bird with DP - but, that all sits up on the skin.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Comments

  • I just pulled one off 10 minutes ago. Brine it and the flavor will permeate the meat. Cook it skin on then remove for those who don't eat it. This bird was so tasty that it didn't need any rub or any skin. The meat was amazing and full of moisture

    I'll never do one without brining again. takes a little more work, but it's so much better that I'm hooked.

    If you don't do skin, then brining is an excellent option for you. Let me know if you need the brine recipe. It's easy but takes some time.





  • Thanks, Cen-Tex.  I would love to see your recipe.  I've been spooked-off because it seems like a lot of work and it also seems like it has little margin for error.  By that, I mean a little bit one way or the other and it doesn't turn-out as good.  Is that true?  Or, is it a forgiving process?
  • Thanks, Cen-Tex.  I would love to see your recipe.  I've been spooked-off because it seems like a lot of work and it also seems like it has little margin for error.  By that, I mean a little bit one way or the other and it doesn't turn-out as good.  Is that true?  Or, is it a forgiving process?
    It's been forgiving for me. This is the first whole bird I've done and it was perfect. I've done turkey and chicken breasts as well and they were great. Pork Chops too.

    I use the recipe from Ruhlman/Polcyn's book Charcuterie. I'm going to post it by itself so we can search it easier.

    Stay tuned..............

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    edited November 2012
    Cen-Tex isn't exaggerating.  Brining brings it to a new level.  And it's really not that hard, although it takes some extra time.  Follow this:

    http://ruhlman.com/2010/10/how-to-brine-chicken-quick-brine-recipe/
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • I do boneless skinless breasts all the time. For me it's a high heat sear folowed by a lower temp roast. I usually do them on the woo down first and then put them on the adjustable rig up high in the dome

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,548
    edited November 2012
    If it were me, I would just cook it with the skin on and then remove the skin after cooking.  You might want to work some of the rub under the skin on the breasts/thighs since you are going to be discarding it. My wife doesn't eat the skin...so I usually eat hers ;)

    I'm sure it would probably be fine if you just want to remove the skin ahead of time, however I would imagine you might loose some of the moisture.  I guess the healthiest choice would be to remove it ahead of time, because some of the fat on and under the skin will soak into the meat during cooking. 


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    If the chicken is brined, I wouldn't have a problem taking all the skin off and putting a rub right on the meat.  They cook so fast, it's not going to dry out unless you grossly overcook it.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • alright, posted it up on the egghead forum so we can all search it if needed

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,367
    edited November 2012
    If it were me, I would just cook it with the skin on and then remove the skin after cooking.  You might want to work some of the rub under the skin on the breasts/thighs since you are going to be discarding it. My wife doesn't eat the skin...so I usually eat hers ;)

    I'm sure it would probably be fine if you just want to remove the skin ahead of time, however I would imagine you might loose some of the moisture.  I guess the healthiest choice would be to remove it ahead of time, because some of the fat on and under the skin will soak into the meat during cooking. 
    This is slightly different than what the USDA found, testing chicken with both skin on and skin off during cooking for calorie count, result was no difference in calories. Skin on during cook and removed prior to eating resulted in juicier chicken. 
    Great idea to rub the meat under the skin and then remove before eating. 
    Given that thighs have as much as 3 times the fat of an equal amount of breast meat, you could eat a skin on chicken breast, including the skin, and take in less fat than someone eating the leg and thigh without the skin. It all becomes relative. 
    In other words, if you enjoy the crispy skin of a dry roasted chicken breast, you could be eating healthier than the health conscious individual who eats a leg and thigh and removes the high fat skin. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,548
    If it were me, I would just cook it with the skin on and then remove the skin after cooking.  You might want to work some of the rub under the skin on the breasts/thighs since you are going to be discarding it. My wife doesn't eat the skin...so I usually eat hers ;)

    I'm sure it would probably be fine if you just want to remove the skin ahead of time, however I would imagine you might loose some of the moisture.  I guess the healthiest choice would be to remove it ahead of time, because some of the fat on and under the skin will soak into the meat during cooking. 
    This is slightly different than what the USDA found, testing chicken with both skin on and skin off during cooking for calorie count, result was no difference in calories. Skin on during cook and removed prior to eating resulted in juicier chicken. 
    Great idea to rub the meat under the skin and then remove before eating. 
    Given that thighs have as much as 3 times the fat of an equal amount of breast meat, you could eat a skin on chicken breast, including the skin, and take in less fat than someone eating the leg and thigh without the skin. It all becomes relative. 
    That's interesting Skiddy- thanks for the info.  In that case it seems to me that removing the skin after the cook is definitely the way to go, especially if you are not brining.  



    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • Ok, I'm sold! 

    The chicken is soaking in brine (which smelled fantastic!!) at this very moment!  Thanks, Nola, for the link!

    Am I really to let this set at room temp on the counter for 3 or 4 hours?!  I can hear my Momma saying "Put that chicken in the fridge!"
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,128
    I'd say work the skin away from the breast and apply the rub between the two, cook and then remove the skin (as others suggested). Give brining a try. Works out great. I've yet to try the ones Nola and Cen-Tex speak of, but have had great results with others.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

     

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,212
    edited November 2012
    Ok, I'm sold! 

    The chicken is soaking in brine (which smelled fantastic!!) at this very moment!  Thanks, Nola, for the link!

    Am I really to let this set at room temp on the counter for 3 or 4 hours?!  I can hear my Momma saying "Put that chicken in the fridge!"
    Just make sure the chicken is fully covered with liquid. The high salt ratio will act as a preservative and Salmonella needs oxygen to start a party. Cooking to 165 eliminates stragglers.
  • If it were me, I would just cook it with the skin on and then remove the skin after cooking.  You might want to work some of the rub under the skin on the breasts/thighs since you are going to be discarding it. My wife doesn't eat the skin...so I usually eat hers ;)

    I'm sure it would probably be fine if you just want to remove the skin ahead of time, however I would imagine you might loose some of the moisture.  I guess the healthiest choice would be to remove it ahead of time, because some of the fat on and under the skin will soak into the meat during cooking. 
    This is slightly different than what the USDA found, testing chicken with both skin on and skin off during cooking for calorie count, result was no difference in calories. Skin on during cook and removed prior to eating resulted in juicier chicken. 
    Great idea to rub the meat under the skin and then remove before eating. 
    Given that thighs have as much as 3 times the fat of an equal amount of breast meat, you could eat a skin on chicken breast, including the skin, and take in less fat than someone eating the leg and thigh without the skin. It all becomes relative. 
    In other words, if you enjoy the crispy skin of a dry roasted chicken breast, you could be eating healthier than the health conscious individual who eats a leg and thigh and removes the high fat skin. 
    Agreed and all correct as far as I have read as well.

    skinless breast = 3gm fat
    skinless thigh = 11gm fat
    skinless leg
    Ok, I'm sold! 

    The chicken is soaking in brine (which smelled fantastic!!) at this very moment!  Thanks, Nola, for the link!

    Am I really to let this set at room temp on the counter for 3 or 4 hours?!  I can hear my Momma saying "Put that chicken in the fridge!"
    Every recipe i've seen says do it in the fridge but 3 or 4 hours is OK at room temp no matter if it's brined or not.



  • Thanks, as always!  The brine smells amazing!  I can't wait for dinner!

    Last question:  it's a big bird (7#) so I'm wondering how much that's going to affect cooking time.  I'm guessing 80-minutes @ 375.  ...but, I'm guessing.   Have any advice?
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,212
    Also, the biggest issue with food poisoning isn't "tainted meat" but cross-contamination. Just use common sense with raw meat.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    edited November 2012

    Ok, I'm sold! 

    The chicken is soaking in brine (which smelled fantastic!!) at this very moment!  Thanks, Nola, for the link!

    Am I really to let this set at room temp on the counter for 3 or 4 hours?!  I can hear my Momma saying "Put that chicken in the fridge!"
    It's totally safe.  That salt creates an inhospitable environment for bacteria.  I just hung raw salted duck breasts with butcher's string from my kitchen cabinet for a week.  Salt is the age old preservative.


    image
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • I think brining on the counter is OK for 3 or 4 hours directly before the cook, keeping the bird submerged in the brine with the container tightly covered with as little air as possible. 

    General food handling safety advises to keep it in the fridge, because it is "idiot proof". Some folks might just not get that a bird on the counter with just a little bit of it sticking above the brine is an accident waiting to happen. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Yeah, with that much salt, you could probably leave it out for much longer that standard practice would say.

  • ...reporting back on my 1st Spatch Chicken.   WOW!!!

    For the folks (like me) who have yet to try brining a bird, try it!  ...I'm absolutely SOLD on brining!!   It was easy to do!  And, the taste was amazing and the bird was so juicy it was practically messy to eat!  

    What was really interesting was how flavorful the meat was.  You could taste all the different flavors (garlic and lemon and parsley, etc.) - but, all the different flavors were very subtle.  I followed the link that Nola shared above and soaked for 5 hours.  On the grill, indirect @ 400 degrees - I chased the temp a little bit, for some reason, and that stretched the total cook time to 1H 45M (but, it was also a 7 1/2# bird).  I pulled @ 165 on the breasts and 190 on the thighs.  It was spectacular!

    Thanks, all, for all the great info!  I'm officially on-board with brining!

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,548
    Good deal- thanks for reporting back!  I have not brined my chicken before, but I think I must try it! 


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 10,889
    edited November 2012
    Nice egger. I just started brining a few weeks ago and I'll never go back. You nailed it when you said how flavorful the meat is. It's not just more moist, you can taste all the subtle flavors of what you put in the brine right in the meat. Its the perfect option for people who don't eat skin but it makes the skin even that much more crispy and delicious for those of us who do. Glad it worked out

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