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Prime Rib Question

I am thinking about doing a Prime Rib this weekend.  I have never smoked one before.  I can't imagine them being harder than turkey or ribs.  Any suggestions as to how long or what temp to cook?  Would you use just charcoal or add wood chips?  What kind?  Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

TarHeelBBQ

Comments

  • I always do Dr. BBQ's way, and they turn out excellent !  

    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,810
    edited November 2012
    Here are a couple of useful links with a couple of different methods. 

    http://www.nakedwhiz.com/madmaxprimerib.htm

    IMO the most important thing is not to overcook it.  I say this, because I usually do :).  

    I love the idea at the end of the post from the @NibbleMeThis link above:

    Notes
    • For your guests that want more than medium rare, a quick "bath" in beef broth in a heated skillet will quickly make the pink disappear and get the slice of roast to their liking. 

    I like some smoke with mine.  I really like cherry.  Next one I am going to try oak.  For some reason I don't think hickory goes well with beef. 


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    Standing rib roast needs to be cooked low and slow so it's done evenly and you have minimal water loss.  I don't use any smoke - neutral lump.  Smoke distracts from the taste IMO.

    Here's how I do it:

    1. salt and pepper rub.
    2. set up egg for indirect at 225F.
    3. add drip pan (to make au jus)
    4. cook until 7F below your desired final internal temp
    5. remove platesetter (go to direct), crank heat up to 500-600F
    6. reverse sear for 5-10 minutes
    7. let it rest (because of the reverse sear) for 20-30 minutes in warming oven.

    If you don't reverse sear, you can carve and eat immediately.  If someone wants their meat done more, throw in baking pan of au jus on stove and cook up to doneness.

    Don't forget the horseradish sauce.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Standing rib roast needs to be cooked low and slow so it's done evenly and you have minimal water loss.  I don't use any smoke - neutral lump.  Smoke distracts from the taste IMO.

    Here's how I do it:

    1. salt and pepper rub.
    2. set up egg for indirect at 225F.
    3. add drip pan (to make au jus)
    4. cook until 7F below your desired final internal temp
    5. remove platesetter (go to direct), crank heat up to 500-600F
    6. reverse sear for 5-10 minutes
    7. let it rest (because of the reverse sear) for 20-30 minutes in warming oven.

    If you don't reverse sear, you can carve and eat immediately.  If someone wants their meat done more, throw in baking pan of au jus on stove and cook up to doneness.

    Don't forget the horseradish sauce.
    Completely agree, in fact we use the same method for steaks and chops. We do use Penzey's English Prime Rib rub (Thanks @Brownie) and let the roast sit in the fridge uncovered overnight.

    A standing rib is so good we do not use smoke at all, some folks do. Although I use a drip pan like @Nolaegghead I seldom have any drippings. I assume the low and slow cooks the meat so gently the moisture stays in the meat. I do put the meat in a pan while the grill heats for the sear and there is always juice there as the moisture redistributes to the outside, this makes a great au jus. I strongly suggest you try without smoke, this cut just doesn't need it.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • I like them done at 250* start to finish.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    Let me clarify - 225 grate - I use the DigiQ.  250 dome is fine too.  Point is, you go to around 300 plus, the ring of meat and fat overcook, and that's some of the best parts of a rib eye. 

    If you have the choice for bone-in - take it.  The bones add flavor. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Standing rib roast needs to be cooked low and slow so it's done evenly and you have minimal water loss.  I don't use any smoke - neutral lump.  Smoke distracts from the taste IMO.

    Here's how I do it:

    1. salt and pepper rub.
    2. set up egg for indirect at 225F.
    3. add drip pan (to make au jus)
    4. cook until 7F below your desired final internal temp
    5. remove platesetter (go to direct), crank heat up to 500-600F
    6. reverse sear for 5-10 minutes
    7. let it rest (because of the reverse sear) for 20-30 minutes in warming oven.

    If you don't reverse sear, you can carve and eat immediately.  If someone wants their meat done more, throw in baking pan of au jus on stove and cook up to doneness.

    Don't forget the horseradish sauce.
    Completely agree, in fact we use the same method for steaks and chops. We do use Penzey's English Prime Rib rub (Thanks @Brownie) and let the roast sit in the fridge uncovered overnight.

    A standing rib is so good we do not use smoke at all, some folks do. Although I use a drip pan like @Nolaegghead I seldom have any drippings. I assume the low and slow cooks the meat so gently the moisture stays in the meat. I do put the meat in a pan while the grill heats for the sear and there is always juice there as the moisture redistributes to the outside, this makes a great au jus. I strongly suggest you try without smoke, this cut just doesn't need it.

    Skiddy,

    I ask for additional fat when I buy the roast. I cut out any meaty streaks from the fat, chop them small amd distribute around the pan. I also throw some of the fat in if I'm doing yorkshires.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • @Little_Steven - Great idea, thanks! Must admit we seldom do Yorshire with "prime" rib, we just pig out on the roast, garlic mashed taters and frizzled onions. Yorkies are great with sirloin tip, or so SWMBO says. Yorkshire, like bacon, makes everything good - although never tried a bacon Yorkshire...... I wonder?  :-$
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,116

    +1 for VI. Here's a great mild horseradish sauce we use. You can use it on some of your sides also.

    Mustard Horseradish Sauce:

    • 1 1/2 cups good mayonnaise
    • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
    • 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
    • 1/3 cup sour cream
    • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

    Whisk together the mayonnaise, mustards, horseradish, sour cream, and salt in a small bowl.

    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • We only do a few a year but when we do its all in. You may be on tho something with the bacon yorkies. Gonna try next time. My point was that the meaty bits caramelise in the pan to form the fond for the gravy.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    My horse sauce is simple:

    low fat sour cream
    horseradish to taste
    salt/pepper to taste
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,810
    Very good tips from all!  Maybe I won't try oak next time as it is very strong...think I'll stick with a little cherry wood. 


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • Have not done one yet but will soon.  Recipe above looks good but I am surprised that you pull at 7 degrees below desired final desired temp. I would have thought that searing plus rest would have resulted in temp rise more than 7 degrees; I would have gussed more like 10-15 degree increase. Gotta try one soon, great cut of meat.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    Have not done one yet but will soon.  Recipe above looks good but I am surprised that you pull at 7 degrees below desired final desired temp. I would have thought that searing plus rest would have resulted in temp rise more than 7 degrees; I would have gussed more like 10-15 degree increase. Gotta try one soon, great cut of meat.
    If I was cooking at 350 versus 225, I'd expect a bigger rise, even with the sear.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,810
    Just wondering what people think about doing the reverse sear on a CI skillet (assuming the roast will fit)?   


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019

    Just wondering what people think about doing the reverse sear on a CI skillet (assuming the roast will fit)?   
    That's really the best way to do it because you're getting more searing with less total heat added, so it's easier to prevent the scourge of searing - overcooking.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,116
    My horse sauce is simple:

    low fat sour cream
    horseradish to taste
    salt/pepper to taste
    Nola, Try adding the mustards and mayo I have in mine to yours as an experiment. I think it takes the sauce to a different flavor profile that is quite good.
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    billyray said:
    My horse sauce is simple:

    low fat sour cream
    horseradish to taste
    salt/pepper to taste
    Nola, Try adding the mustards and mayo I have in mine to yours as an experiment. I think it takes the sauce to a different flavor profile that is quite good.
    I'll do that.  I like both mustard and mayo.  Thanks.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • On Rib Roasts, particularly those that are choice grade I like to build in at least a 48-72 hour of "dry aging" before seasoning and roasting.  I have found the flavor and the overall finished product to be better.  Im just talking about taking it outta the package and putting on a v-rack over paper towels for a couple of days in the fridge.

  • Thanks everyone.  I will let you know

    TarHeel BBQ

  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
    @Skiddymarker  Your welcome. I'm glad you're enjoying it. :)
  • One thing to consider if you do a low temp cook is that the meat will look more rare than it is. This was done to 150* before the rest. I did it to prove a point to a specialist in rancid meat.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
    I've never heard of anyone making a rib roast to make a point. You have a funny way of dealing business above the border.  =))
  • Blame stike

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,941

    I'm in the low&slow camp for prime rib...

    @Brownie - 'bout time you surfaced-hope all is well.

    Louisville
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,019
    150 - that's medium well.  Don't look it.  That's when PR starts getting tough and you actually have to chew it.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • It was buttah. Did that one @ 200*.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
    @lousubcap  All is well. My super busy work schedule has kept me from cooking anything more than steaks and hot dogs... thats why the absence.
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