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Foiling Ribs

gfavorgfavor Posts: 57
I've been reading about cooking pork ribs on the BGE. Many folks like to wrap the ribs in foil during the cook; like maybe the last half of the cook. Is it really important to foil wrap ribs?

Comments

  • Some folks do and some don't.  I don't and thats the way my family & I like them.  It's just another method.

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

  • FxLynchFxLynch Posts: 433
    edited November 2012
    I do 3-2-1 method at about 250-275 dome with the plate setter and a drip pan
    3 hours rubbed and on the grate
    2 hours wrapped in foil with a little liquid splashed inside
    1 hour unwrapped back on the grate

    We love them using this method.  I've not heard a whole lot of people who foil, caring how others cook them.  Lots of people in the "no foil" camp seem to think foiling is bad.  Draw your own conclusions.  I just do them the way my family and friends love them.

    Frank

    *edit* Making them fall off the bone is easy with foil, but falling off the bone isn't "competition" style
  • Ragtop99Ragtop99 Posts: 1,120
    edited November 2012
    Not a fan of the foil as it is like steaming your meat, but plenty of people use it with good results.  Nice thing about not using it is that making ribs become a set and forget cook.  No need to interrupt your day to do anything.

    I'd suggest you make two slabs next time.  One with foil like FX's method or how you've been doing it, and one simply 4 or 5 hours plain and sauce the last hour. 
    Cooking on an XL and Medium in Bethesda, MD.
  • FxLynchFxLynch Posts: 433
    Ragtop99 said:
    Not a fan of the foil as it is like steaming your meat, but plenty of people use it with good results.  Nice thing about not using it is that making ribs become a set and forget cook.  No need to interrupt your day to do anything.

    I'd suggest you make two slabs next time.  One with foil like FX's method or how you've been doing it, and one simply 4 or 5 hours plain and sauce the last hour. 
    I actually want to give your method a try, I've gotta say on the egg I've only foiled so I do need a comparison.  If the family and I like them as well I'd definitely switch over.

  • njlnjl Posts: 768
    It's a method to try to get a more "fall off the bone" result.  For turbo, with baby backs, I've done 1hr in the rib rack at 350F indirect, 1 hour "boated" still at 350F indirect with some liquid (apple juice, beer, whatever), then about 30 minutes on the grate with bbq sauce painted on them, still at 350F indirect.  Next cook, I'm going to try more like 90 minutes in the boat.
  • Ragtop99Ragtop99 Posts: 1,120
    The texture will be a little different without the foil.  I grew up on unfoiled, so that's why I do it.  Flavor may be slightly different depending upon the liquid you put in your foil.  Some will spray apple juice to regain some of the flavor effects of foiling. 

    I like the simple. Smoke and a bit of spice.  If I make two slabs, I'll leave half a slab unsauced and eat it plain. 
    Cooking on an XL and Medium in Bethesda, MD.
  • I do same foil method as FX and njl and that's what my family likes although been meaning to try with no foil.
    Clarendon Hills, IL
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,745
    edited November 2012
    If we are having ribs slathered in BBq sauce, foil it is, the rib is the delivery medium for the sauce. If we are having just ribs, dry rub (whatever turns your crank) and that's it. 
    Most of the folks we have over, rave at the BBQ slathered ribs because that's what they expect. It is hard to overcook a foiled rib. (Some would say a foiled rib is overcooked to begin with) To each his own. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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