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Brined chicken, turkey and chops- Charcuterie Style

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Comments

  • U_tarded said:
    Great color on the chicken and turkey. Brined chicken is my favorite flavor profile for it, plus it takes the smoke to a different level. Thanks for sharing!

    You nailed it. The smoke actually tasted like cherries. It was so subtle but it really picked up the flavor of the wood. I've never been able to really dscern between apple or cherry etc but you definitely can after a brine. If you read the book, this is from the "pellicle" that forms on the outside after the brine. The pellicle is a sticky surface that forms on the outside that absorbs the smoke flavor in a way that non-brined foods don't. IT wasn't smokier, it was more flavorful and you could taste the fruit from the cherry wood. Super cool.

  • CT Your cook looks amazing!  Did you put the curing salts in the brine?

    Just trimmed a pork loin, getting ready for canadian bacon.  Will start the brine on Wednesday so its ready to smoke for the weekend.  I did the Bacon and it turned out fantastic.  My next project will be turkey breast, then Corned beef.

    My wife can;t believe what I am turning out these days.  All you guys are an inspiration!

    Simi Valley, California
  • CT Your cook looks amazing!  Did you put the curing salts in the brine?

    Just trimmed a pork loin, getting ready for canadian bacon.  Will start the brine on Wednesday so its ready to smoke for the weekend.  I did the Bacon and it turned out fantastic.  My next project will be turkey breast, then Corned beef.

    My wife can;t believe what I am turning out these days.  All you guys are an inspiration!


    no curing salts in this one. Just a kosher salt brine. I'll post the recipe here in a minute

  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,223
    edited October 2012


    U_tarded said:

    Great color on the chicken and turkey. Brined chicken is my favorite flavor profile for it, plus it takes the smoke to a different level. Thanks for sharing!




    You nailed it. The smoke actually tasted like cherries. It was so subtle but it really picked up the flavor of the wood. I've never been able to really dscern between apple or cherry etc but you definitely can after a brine. If you read the book, this is from the "pellicle" that forms on the outside after the brine. The pellicle is a sticky surface that forms on the outside that absorbs the smoke flavor in a way that non-brined foods don't. IT wasn't smokier, it was more flavorful and you could taste the fruit from the cherry wood. Super cool.

    Before I first brined something I couldn't discern much between woods especially on pork and poultry. But after I learned about brining and how to control smoke the different woods took on different flavor profiles, and that became really apparent to me, it was game changing. Think how much things change now doing everything else the same but using plum wood or apricot or other random woods you wouldn't use before because you couldn't taste it.
  • Here is the poultry Brine (Credit: Charcuterie- Brian Polcyn/Michael Rulman)

    1 Gallon/4 Liters Water
    1cup/225 grams sugar
    1 bunch fresh Tarragon (about an ounce/25 grams)
    1 bunch fresh parsley (about and ounce/25 grams)
    2 bay leaves
    1 head garlic halved horizontally
    1 onion sliced
    2 TBSP/30 grams black peppercorns lightly crushed with the bottom of a saute pan
    2 lemons, halved

    Combine all ingredients in a pot, give the lemons a good squeeze before throwing them in. put over high heat and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve all the salt and sugar. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temp. The refrigerate until chilled.

    Once chilled, add the bird and weight down with a plate or something similar and leave in the fridge for the appropriate times. You are gonna have to buy the book for the brine times :)




  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 5,131
    That looks amazing Cen-Tex.  As if this hobby isn't time consuming enough...now I have to go down this avenue! 


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg wing. 
    2014 Wing King's Apprentice
  • That looks amazing Cen-Tex.  As if this hobby isn't time consuming enough...now I have to go down this avenue! 
    This is a little more time intensive but it was amazing



  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,727
    Aw, could you just shut the ____ up. Whatta maroon

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • ................1 more word and I hit the abuse button



  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,727
    I hit it a bunch of times on me already. I am so outa here, I remember when this was a much more friendlier place

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632
    Looks great. I just got this book last week and have been reading through it. I think Canadian Bacon will be my first. I too am wondering about hanging some of the meat. No basements in our house, not sure where to hang it or how to keep track of humidity/control it. Worried I'll kill myself.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • Griffin said:
    Looks great. I just got this book last week and have been reading through it. I think Canadian Bacon will be my first. I too am wondering about hanging some of the meat. No basements in our house, not sure where to hang it or how to keep track of humidity/control it. Worried I'll kill myself.
    You can't kill yourself unless it's canned/vac sealed. That's where the botulism comes in to play. Outside of that, you can only make yourself sick :)



  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632
    Being sarcastic about the killing myself. I don't want to be stuck by the bathroom with food poisoning if I screw it up, though.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • Griffin said:
    Being sarcastic about the killing myself. I don't want to be stuck by the bathroom with food poisoning if I screw it up, though.
    I knew you were. And I hear you on the food poisoning. You just wish you were dead.



  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    CT.....food looks great...even the blurry chops!

    I did a yard bird last night, and was wishing I had taken the time to brine it. Just picked up some chops from the market, and I will this brine a shot. Will also throw in some cherry wood to see if I am able to pick up the difference.
  • AleBrewer said:
    CT.....food looks great...even the blurry chops!

    I did a yard bird last night, and was wishing I had taken the time to brine it. Just picked up some chops from the market, and I will this brine a shot. Will also throw in some cherry wood to see if I am able to pick up the difference.
    The pork brine is a little different. Do you want met to post it for you?

  • DocWonmugDocWonmug Posts: 266
    Botulism was originally called sausage sickness. Before cans. The casing kept the air out.
    LBGE
  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    AleBrewer said:
    CT.....food looks great...even the blurry chops!

    I did a yard bird last night, and was wishing I had taken the time to brine it. Just picked up some chops from the market, and I will this brine a shot. Will also throw in some cherry wood to see if I am able to pick up the difference.
    The pork brine is a little different. Do you want met to post it for you?
    Was it the garlic & sage pork brine from the book? I have it, and am hoping to try it later this week.
  • AleBrewer said:
    AleBrewer said:
    CT.....food looks great...even the blurry chops!

    I did a yard bird last night, and was wishing I had taken the time to brine it. Just picked up some chops from the market, and I will this brine a shot. Will also throw in some cherry wood to see if I am able to pick up the difference.
    The pork brine is a little different. Do you want met to post it for you?
    Was it the garlic & sage pork brine from the book? I have it, and am hoping to try it later this week.
    yep.



  • Well I'll be a suck egg mule!  I decided to re-look at this thread because a lot of people I respect on this forum are buzzing about brining, curing and otherwise playing with salt.  I figure this thread stirred things up a bit recently.  I knew Cen-Tex referred to a book and I thought I would look it up.  Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking & Curing by Michael Ruhlman & Brian Polcyn.  Looking at the bios I noticed that Polcyn teaches at Schoolcraft College in Livonia Michigan.  Right around the corner from my Mom's house!  Now I gotta check this out!

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

  • Oops- cut and pasted that recipe and the 1 cup of salt (most important ingredient in the brine) was left of. 

    Thanks NOLA for catching that!



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