Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

First timer question

So got my new shiny Egg from Eggtoberfest and have only done a few cooks. The first, about 2 hours after i got the egg, was just a boneless skinless chicken breast with a rub from Dinosaur BBQ and finished w their BBQ sauce. I got the egg to temp, 375, and cooked till 155-160 internal temp. It was direct grill, have not have time to get the toys yet. My problem is that the chicken came out a bit tough, rubbery. It was not dry. Did I over cook it? I did a NY strip and rib eye the next night, each 1.5-2 inches thick. Cooked it according to a recipie found in the BGE cook book. Direct at 650, 3 min a side, shut it down, cook for 3 more min, rest for 5-10 min Added a couple chunks of musquet Cooked to mid rare and rested for at least 8 mins. Again a bit rubbery- though they seemed more tender after a few mins after the first bite Did I not let it rest long enough? Did more chicken the next night with a speedie marinade, again rubber using the same method as above. What am I doing wrong? The meats are from the same places I have always gotten meat and have not had this problem before. Any help would be grand, thanks

Comments

  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,150
    i don't know an exact answer to your question but do you have a meat thermometer, and if so did you cook to temp prior to the egg?  the reason I ask is the first time i cooked a chicken breast to 160 for my wife she thought it had a funny texture, it was super juicy and i attributed it to us being used to over dry foods.  it really is a different world to cook to temp instead of the old standby "i think its done."  also on the steaks when "shutting it down" dont close the vents completely the soot has no where to go and your food will taste like and ashtray, most people will pull them off the grill, drop temp and the roast them until desired temp is reached.  
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,863
    Sounds like you cooked everything right, if you have an accurate meat thermometer like a Thermapen.  Not having all the details and assuming the cook temps and smoke and all that are within reasonable limits, I'd suspect the meat quality.  To reiterate, I can't say that (or anything) is the actual reason.
    ______________________________________________
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  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,385
    edited October 2012
    I find for steaks of at least 1-1/2" thick, cook them indirect at as low as you can get the egg. Have some rub, whatever you like. Cook until internal temp is 115-120, then take it off and let it rest while you open the bottom vent fully and take the top off. Cook direct now. The egg will roar to life and then do your sear, Maybe 1 min a side. Meat is juicy and tender, a reverse sear - really works. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,113
    edited October 2012
    Since you don't have any toys yet, I assume you are cooking at the regular grid level. 375 direct dome temp. with the grate at the regular level could be well over 400 at the grate. I always do chicken at 375-400, but on a raised grid. Pull breast between 160-165 and they have a good texture and are juicy. 
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,171
    I can't say that I've had very much "rubbery" meat. But my guess is that the meat is heating too fast, causing the muscle fibers to shrink, and expel water, but not stay hot long enough for the connective tissue to break down a lot. If you are cooking direct at the lower position, the meat certainly is getting a lot more heat than what the dome temp registers. Whenever I cook like that, I expect to flip the food at least every 10 minutes, and shift it around the grill to avoid hot spots.

    2 suggestions.

    Brine the chicken over nite. More water will be drawn into the flesh, and the meat will tenderize slightly.

    Try "hot tubbing" the steaks. Season them as you like, sear them in a plastic bag w. as little air left inside as possible, and immerse in 130F water. Let them sit in the water for about 45 minutes. At that point, they will be cooked rare. Then sear them on the Egg for 30 seconds per 1/2 inch per side.
  • Skinless chicken breast are are tough cook and can loose what little moisture they have quickly.  I would suggest that you cook chicken breast on the bone for more flavor and protection from the direst heat.  Brining the breast will also help.  

    As far as the beef pulling off at desired temp (i.e. 130) will yield about 5+ degrees higher after resting. Resting is important for the juices to be reabsorbed and the muscle fiber to relax.  As you noted the meat seemed "more tender after a couple of bites".
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • LootyLooty Posts: 10
    What are these and what do they do?

    photo.JPG
    2448 x 3264 - 3M
  • LootyLooty Posts: 10
    Is this a concern?
    The Egg is band new, with 3 cooks.

    photo.JPG
    2448 x 3264 - 1M
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,385
    Looty said:
    Is this a concern?
    The Egg is band new, with 3 cooks.

    Yes - easy to fix, but talk to your dealer first. 
    Looty said:
    What are these and what do they do?

    I think the flat things with a half round end are to cover the finger slicing tabs on the lower vent. Not sure what the plumber's wrench is for or the "petite condom". 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • LootyLooty Posts: 10
    thanks for the help everyone

    will make a visit to the dealer

  • SigPSigP Posts: 25
    Looty said:
    What are these and what do they do?

    The wrench is to hold the large nuts on the casters as you tighten the top nut. The small rubbery things go over exposed bolts and the large ones go over the exposed top of the nest supports.

  • pezking7ppezking7p Posts: 121
    375 is too low for chicken.  cook at 450-475 and you'll have much better results.  At 375 the chicken is drying out on the outside before the inside is done.

    For steaks, I follow the Trex method and have great results every time. 
  • DocWonmugDocWonmug Posts: 225
    The flat rubber things go over the ends of the nest. BGE says they are REQUIRED to keep the egg from slipping out. And to keep it from getting scratched. I put mine in. They slipped around for a bit, but are firm now. I suggest you put them in.
    LBGE
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