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Prime Rib HELP!!

boysmom2boysmom2 Posts: 5
Hi,
I'm new to the Big Green Egg and to the forum. I've used my Egg a few times and have been happy, but last night I made a Prime Rib roast and it was terrible!  It was a 3 rib roast and I cooked it at about 310 until the internal temp registered 140.  I took it out and let it rest a bit, but when I went to cut it, it was like cutting through stone.  It was EXTREMELY tough. The inside was pink though, but not moist at all...it was completely dry.  Any ideas what went wrong??? I was hoping to make my Christmas Dinner with this, but I'm having second thoughts now.
Thanks

Comments

  • Folks are probably gonna want to know the set up you had prior to giving advice. Were you cooking indirect, direct ,raised grid ,ect.
    Ova B.
    Fulton MO
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,030
    Do you know what grade the meat was? I suspect that, not the egg or cooking.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Do you know what grade the meat was? I suspect that, not the egg or cooking.
    I agree with this. I recently did a prime rib and it sucked. The meat had very little marbling. You need that in prime rib.
    Sarasota, FL via Boynton Beach, FL, via Sarasota, FL, via Charleston, SC, via The Outer Banks, via God's Country (East TN on Ft. Loudon Lake)
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736
    I agree the quality is important.  You want fat marbling. 

    It sounds like you cooked it to medium well, where this roast gets dry and tough.  You cooked it hot (calibrate your dome thermo).  That hot and I wouldn't be surprised if the internal temp was 150 plus.  Rib roast stays pink through MW-W.

    I salt and pepper, don't add smoke, cook at 200-225 to 125 internal.  Might do a quick reverse sear.  Catch the drippings for au jus.  Must less rise cooking low than high.  It almost sounds like you were cooking hotter than 310.
    ______________________________________________
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736
    Also, what did you use for an internal thermometer?  Check its calibration.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736
    Do you know what grade the meat was? I suspect that, not the egg or cooking.
    He said it was prime.  If it was, it should have this stamp on it (look for a ink stamp).


    image
    2010-01-11 17.40.56.jpg
    2592 x 1936 - 1M
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736
    The inside of prime has a lot of fat.  I cut this up to freeze.


    image
    2010-01-13 19.40.03.jpg
    2592 x 1936 - 1M
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • I was cooking it indirect w/the plate setter upside down and the meat on the wire rack.  I cooked it for about 2 1/2 - 3 hours, the temp was fluctuating between 310 - 350.  Honestly, I'm not sure of the grade of meat.  I got it from the market that I purchase all of my meat from and never had any issues in the past...it's possible that it was a bad piece of meat.  The thermometer is the one I always use, it's always been accurate.  How do I check the calibration on an instant read thermometer?  Usually when I cook it in the oven, it's moist and juicy this was just so awful.  
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736
    You put your thermometer in boiling water.  If you're at sea level, it should read 212 F.  If you're at a higher altitude, you can look up the boiling point, but it will be a little less - 211-200.  In Denver, water boils at 203 F.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • Thanks, I'm going to try that. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736
    The setup you described is fine.  Only thing I'd add is a drip pan.  Prime and choice make fine roasts.  Select, I'd rather grill as steaks. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • Thermometer registered 212 so that's good.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736
    Check the dome and meat thermometers.  I think you'll be fine if you cook as I described.  I've cooked hundreds of standing rib roasts when I was a chef - they're really pretty fool proof if you follow those temp guidelines.  About 130 is the highest I'd ever cook the roast.  If some one wants it over medium rare, cook it up 10 degrees in an au jus bath.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • What temp do you keep the egg at?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,736


    I salt and pepper, don't add smoke, cook at 200-225 to 125 internal.  Might do a quick reverse sear.  Catch the drippings for au jus. 
    You can get away with 250 if you have trouble keeping it at those temps.  You can cook hotter, but the hotter you cook the more temp rise you'll have after you pull it off.  Compensate for that.  A lower temp cook will give you a more even doneness.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • OK thanks...I'll try it again, it seems like it was either a poor cut of meat, or 300 F was too high.
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,030
    Nah, 300* is not too high. I do mine as Nola does but I have done them higher. Heat is not going to make a good quality roast tough, maybe overdone, but they have so much fat they will stay tender.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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