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Brisket tough

atbarratbarr Posts: 26
edited October 2012 in Beef
Hello people, my first post here, I recently purchased a LGE, and I am extremely pleased with it. The Pork Tenderloin came out perfect, as did the grilled T-bone and Pork chops.

This weekend I smoked a 7 lb. brisket. I used a plate setter with a pan of water, for indirect heat. The night before I injected it with a marinade of beef stock, Worcester sauce, Soy sauce and some Butt Rubb. Around 9:00 AM I finally settled the egg to a temp. of 196-198, using a Maverick ET732. The brisket finally settled to a temp of 151 for several hours an Egg temp. of 196-198. I bumped the temp. to 215. At 6:00 PM, the internal temp. was still only 165 degrees. The brisket was fairly tough. So tomorrow I'm wrapping the brisket in foil (after spraying with apple juice and bourbon) at a temp. of 200 for 6 hrs.

What did I do wrong?

Thanks people, I did try to search for the answer.

Comments

  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,291
    First of all, welcome. Glad to have you and glad to help you. 

    You did everything wrong.

    1. buy a bigger whole packer brisket 10-13lbs
    2. cook at a much hotter temp. I like to do 300 dome.
    3. brisket is done when it is done but not usually until 195 or so. 

    The reason yours was dry is because you didnt cook it long enough. (if I am reading you right)

    Here is a link to how I cook a brisket. Good luck next time. 

    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,680
    edited October 2012

    Most important factor in a good brisket is pulling it at the right time. If it's tough, it's under done.  I cook nothing but flats (whole packers hard to find around here)  and start checking for doneness at 195. If your probe goes in easily, it's done.  I don't baste, spray, inject or foil. I put the brisket on and leave the lid down until it reached 195.  Keep it simple and pull it off at the right time and you'll have a good brisket every cook.

    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • HashmakerHashmaker Posts: 149
    I did two briskets Friday night. These were 6 - 7 lbs.each. I haven't found any whole packers yet. The biggest I've found is a little over 9 pounds. One with a coffee rub and the other with a McCormick rub. I cooked them at 275 dome temp. The drip pan is empty and sitting on balls of foil so the drippings don't burn. I've never put any liquid in my drip pans. I think the egg doesn't need it. They went on at 10pm Friday night and one was pulled off at 11:30 am Saturday and the other one came off at 1 pm Saturday. I pulled them off when the thermometer read 195. I FTC'd them til 3:30 and pulled them out and sliced them up. They were moist, tender and gone in about 30 minutes. Since I'm still working on building my accessory collection and don't have a grill extender yet, I used two bricks to get my grill set up. My next brisket cook will be like travis posted above.
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  • Dave in FloridaDave in Florida Posts: 747
    edited October 2012
    Sounds like you may have had just a flat?  Also sounds like you did not cook to tenderness.  This is by far the best flat I have done and how I did it.

    http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=1260480&catid=1#
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Welcome to the Swamp.....GO GATORS!!!!
  • atbarr said:
    Lot's to learn.

    Thanks
    You are in the right place. I cook hotter too (around 300). I don't inject, I don't spray, I just rub and cook until done. Travis is right on all the other stuff. Keep it coming, we are glad to help

  • atbarratbarr Posts: 26
    Thanks for the great information fellows. I sprayed it with apple juice and bourbon, double wrapped it and baked @ 200 for 6 hrs. That made a big difference in the tenderness. My next brisket will be smoked at 300.


  • fairchasefairchase Posts: 192
    What grade of beef was your brisket ? I myself refuse to cook anything less than choice when it comes to brisket. I find that the piece of meat itself is the most important factor of a cook. Start with a bad piece of meat and everything else is just a waste of time . The other pointers you have received have been spot on as well.
  • atbarratbarr Posts: 26
    To be honest I don't know. I picked it up at Kroger in Brannon Crossing, in Nicholasville, KY. Normally their meat is pretty good.
  • atbarr said:
    To be honest I don't know. I picked it up at Kroger in Brannon Crossing, in Nicholasville, KY. Normally their meat is pretty good.
    actually good advice but I say start with learning to cook it correctly, then worry about the grade. You are on the right path. If you cooked a prime brisket the way you cooked this one, you would have been out $70. It's all good, just take trav's advice and ask again if anything does not make sense. Brisket is hard to get right but if you listen to Trav and others, you will be OK. Choice is better but just worry aout process first- then tweak it with finding the best grades

  • TanoTano Posts: 4
    ChokeonSmoke is 100% correct. "Most important factor in a good brisket is pulling it at the right time."  Inject and Marinade, overnight then use rub of your choice. (I really like Magic Dust Rub, you can make it yourself) I smoke mine at 250 for at long as it takes to get to brisket to 195.  Pull off your egg double wrap in foil and then wrap in a large towel and place in a playmate for 1 to 2 hours.  Now you are ready to plate it up, enjoy butter soft tasty brisket.
  • I commend you for trying your first brisket, it can be a little daunting if you have never done one before.  You had the low and slow right, but your low was too low, as mentioned above you want a temp that is higher than 225, I usually settle my BGE at 225 to 250,  and I also use a DigiQ to help control the heat easier.  I have never injected a brisket, although I do have one that I have been wanting to try.  Keep your brisket cooking until it hits 195 to 200 internal temp, you never want to pull it off earlier than this.  I also will double to triple wrap in foil, wrap with a towel, and throw it into a cooler for a couple of hours before slicing, this helps to break down the connective tissue even more.  When all is said and done I usually figure about an hour per pound for 1 brisket.  

    Good Luck!
  • atbarratbarr Posts: 26
    Lot's of great info, I hope in the future I can contribute.
  • fairchasefairchase Posts: 192
    edited October 2012
    atbarr said:
    I agree that learning how to cook is very important. However the Question was asked about a tough brisket. In my experience tough means one of two things ; it's under cooked and or it's a tough or bad piece of meat. The poster didn't say it was dry. Brisket is different from other meats , and I think grade of meat has alot to do with how this cook turns out. Point being. After you have learned how to cook brisket to your liking go out and buy the cheapest grade of brisket you can find. Cook it up the same way you have been cooking your briskets in the past , and I bet your dog wont be able to chew it up. I get nothing but complements on the choice grade briskets I cook . The couple of select ones I've tried have not been to my liking. Therefor I only cook choice when it comes to brisket.
    To be honest I don't know. I picked it up at Kroger in Brannon Crossing, in Nicholasville, KY. Normally their meat is pretty good.
    actually good advice but I say start with learning to cook it correctly, then worry about the grade. You are on the right path. If you cooked a prime brisket the way you cooked this one, you would have been out $70. It's all good, just take trav's advice and ask again if anything does not make sense. Brisket is hard to get right but if you listen to Trav and others, you will be OK. Choice is better but just worry aout process first- then tweak it with finding the best grades


    While I agree learning how to cook correctly is very important  ; I am still of the opinion that brisket is  a very different creature and a bad brisket in the cryovac will be a bad brisket at the table.
  • another key to a tender Brisket is how you cut it. Before I rub the brisket, I cut a slit in it against the grain. If you dont, it is nearly impossible to see which way the grain runs so that it is cut properly and comes out tender. Good Luck

  • The best advise I ever recieved was to place the Brisket in heavy duty foil the last 1-2 hours of cooking time. This will deliver tender meat - every time.
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