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Le Creuset Dutch Oven

bettysnephewbettysnephew Posts: 736
edited October 2012 in EggHead Forum
As a gift from my employer for 35 years of service, I was given a gift certificate to purchase something I would like to have.  The wife and I have decided on a Le Creuset dutch oven, which we can both use.  Any suggestions from those of you that own one as to what size (5 or 7.25 qt) and shape (oval or round) you would recommend.  It will be used in the Egg and the conventional oven, so I will be changing the lid handle to stainless.
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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Comments

  • We have 5 - 2 small, one large, and one is the largest they make.  We use the smalls for rice, canned beans, etc., the large for spaghetti, soups, etc.  I am surprised at how often we use the very large one.  I got it because I was fixing osso bucco for 10 people, but I use it a lot for making things like beef and chicken stock.  

    I never use them in the Egg.  I like to use my cast iron DO's for that.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • Solson005Solson005 Posts: 1,841
    I have a 5 1/2 qt round and use it all the time. I think it is a perfect size, I use it most for soups, jambalaya, gumbo that kind of thing. Just like @Vilage_Idiot said I have not used it in the egg as I have Cast Iron ones as well.  
    Large & Small BGE, CGW Two-Tier Swing Rack for BOTH EGGS, Spider for the Wok, eggCARTen & and Cedar Pergola my Eggs call home in Edmond, OK. 
  • I have have an oval enameled cast iron dutch oven and I prefer it over the round. I prefer the oval since there are more meats that i cook that are oval in shape and it just tends to fit all the ingredients a bit better. The downside is that burners on stoves are not oval, they are round so the heating of the dutch oven is not exactly even. This however is somewhat irrelevant since cast iron heats and maintains heat so well. 

    I know that sounds confusing but hopefully it makes sense. :) 
  • Mike8itMike8it Posts: 468
    I have 7.25 quart (I believe) and it is round. I love it but I do not use it on the egg. I have heard many people using them on the egg without any harm. I just use a non-porcelain enameled cast iron Dutch oven on the egg.
  • Le Creuset is pretty expensive stuff. I have several pieces and use them on the egg but I kinda wish I had just picked up a couple of cheaper ones, like Kitchenaid, for the egg work
  • With the minimal cost of a Lodge C I dutch oven, I think it might be best to follow the crowd regarding use on the Egg.
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 721
    But don't pass on the Le Creuset! I have the 3.5 quart, the 13 quart and a roasting pan. Love them all. They truly are superior, particularly for browning. I wouldn't put them in the Egg, though, and my husband visibly cringed at the mere thought. 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
  • jlsm, why not use the Le Cueuset on the egg?.  I have 3 LC's  that go on the egg all the time.  The small is my go to for camp bread. The smoke stain cleans up with either the LC cleaning solution, or lightly smear a non scented dishwashing soap on the outside and the soots cleans right off with water.  You can also foil wrap the outside too.
    I also have CI, Staubs and Emile Henry cookware and they all go on the egg.
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 721
    You're absolutely right, of course. Logically, I knew this, but emotionally, with the cookware costing so much, I just haven't been able to do it. I have used other nice cookware and it cleaned easily by soaking overnight in dishwasher liquid and water. Now I just might need to do a batch of cowboy beans in my small LC this weekend. 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
  • betty, get what comfortable fits on your egg and your cooking needs
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,517
    I have the 2.5 qt Doufeu, 5.25 qt round, 6.5 qt oval and a 7.5 qt Bouillabasse pot. I use the Doufeu for small meals and reheating meat(I can add ice to the lid and the dimples allow for self-basting so I don't have to add any liquid to BBQ for reheating). The round is what I use the most for cooking stews, soups or casseroles. I also roast meats such as Beef Bourguignon and Poulet en coccotte. I do long roasts in the oval as well as larger cuts of meat due to the increases surface area for browning. I use the Bouillabasse for large amounts of sauces(marinara) and soups and stews for larger crowds, since the rounded bottom lends itself to better stirring. 

    In terms of comparable ones(price point), you have Staub which is also made in france. If you are interested in the traditional aspect of these pots, this may be a point of concern for you.

    There are also many brands that sell enameled cast iron made in China, such as Lodge or Kitchen Aid. I have seen a Costco-branded one that is made in either China or Thailand. "Insert celebrity-chef's name here" branded ones are also made in China. All in all, they should complete the same function. I could only see the Staub or Le Creuset being heirloom-quality, if that concerns you.

    Getting a Lodge CI DO works too. It will be easier to "keep clean" on the egg and has it's own advantages and limitations. There is some argument about using acidic foods in them but this shouldn't be an issue if your pan is well seasoned and you don't use it for storage. Also, if size is a factor, Le Creuset beats the Lodge by at least 5 qts for their largest size. I doubt this is an issue, unless you are feeding double-digit family frequently. Plus, they get incredibly heavy so having 2 to match the volume would be better and more versatile, in my opinion.

    Le Creuset are nice to look at(they cook really well too), but for strict egg use I would go with the Lodge for ease of clean-up.
  • BudgeezerBudgeezer Posts: 443
    I have the 7.25 Le Creuset round that I absolutely love for braising, when I wanted to use it on the egg my wife was totally against it.  I now also own a 8 quart Lodge DO as well and have used it many times on the egg.  Best to keep the wife happy and now there are no concerns regarding the Le Creuset.  I think the handle on the Le Creuset is rated to @ least 400 degrees so you should be safe there.
    Edina, MN
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,017
    There's a big difference between enameled cast iron and seasoned cast iron in taste, browning, adding iron, carryover of flavor.  The enameled surface is inert - like glass or stainless.  The cast iron changes the taste of the food.  I think you could make an argument they're different cooking tools, and you could justify owning both.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • On the superb advice of this forum, I will "get both".  The best of two worlds, since I have no cash outlay in this instance due to the gift certificate.  The five qt Lodge double dutch with the skillet top for the Egg and a still to be determined Le Creuset (or Staub) for use in the kitchen.  

    We chose to go with the L C due to many citings of the enamel spalling off on the copies.  There is also a concern of the Asian made cast iron containing lead as was reported on the internet.  I inhale enough of that to meet my minimum daily requirement when I shoot at the indoor range in winter months.  I am not familiar with Staub, but will look into it.
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  •  I inhale enough of that to meet my minimum daily requirement when I shoot at the indoor range in winter months.

    All of the indoor ranges I've been to don't allow lead bullets.  By the way, Le Creuset's are not immune to wear and tear.  This is my oldest one.  That's not stain - the enamel has come off over time.


    lecreuset.jpg
    1280 x 978 - 127K
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • Mike8itMike8it Posts: 468



     I inhale enough of that to meet my minimum daily requirement when I shoot at the indoor range in winter months.

    All of the indoor ranges I've been to don't allow lead bullets.  By the way, Le Creuset's are not immune to wear and tear.  This is my oldest one.  That's not stain - the enamel has come off over time.



    VI- how old is that one? I'm guessing you used it a ton of times before that happened.

  • Mike8it said:
    VI- how old is that one? I'm guessing you used it a ton of times before that happened.
    Mike,

    I'm guessing it's about 8 or 9 years old.  Yes, we've used it a lot, but I don't think we've abused it.  Rarely, if ever, put it in the dishwasher, and never use anything like steel wool.  Perhaps the harshest thing is those green and yellow scrub sponges.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 15,830
     I inhale enough of that to meet my minimum daily requirement when I shoot at the indoor range in winter months.

    All of the indoor ranges I've been to don't allow lead bullets.  By the way, Le Creuset's are not immune to wear and tear.  This is my oldest one.  That's not stain - the enamel has come off over time.


    ive got a few pops in mine from spaghetti, if it sticks in the beginning to the pot it heats up underneath and pops a little piece out, but nothing like yours
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,017
    On the superb advice of this forum, I will "get both".  The best of two worlds, since I have no cash outlay in this instance due to the gift certificate.  The five qt Lodge double dutch with the skillet top for the Egg and a still to be determined Le Creuset (or Staub) for use in the kitchen.  

    We chose to go with the L C due to many citings of the enamel spalling off on the copies.  There is also a concern of the Asian made cast iron containing lead as was reported on the internet.  I inhale enough of that to meet my minimum daily requirement when I shoot at the indoor range in winter months.  I am not familiar with Staub, but will look into it.
    I used to do heavy metal leach tests on imported dishes way back in the day.  I would think a bigger risk from Chinese cookware (or some other country with low or no regulations) would be in the enamel or ceramic coating rather than in the iron.  Iron in cast iron needs to be a pretty high grade - it's iron from pig iron, silicone and carbon. 

    Lead, on the other hand, is great for impact resistance, shine and bold colors in glazes.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,549
    Le Creuset is pretty expensive stuff. I have several pieces and use them on the egg but I kinda wish I had just picked up a couple of cheaper ones, like Kitchenaid, for the egg work
    Agreed, use Kitchenaid, $30 on sale (70% off) for "outdoor cooks. I have a favorite Le Creuset oval which is perfect for pot roasts, Sears nicely then into the oven to do its thing.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • @VI - send it back.  LC have lifetime warranties great service - much like BGE.
    Mamaroneck
  • ...but we never use our LC stuff on our BGE either...
    Mamaroneck
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,159
    @VI - send it back.  LC have lifetime warranties great service - much like BGE.
    Really?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,017
    VI - do you consider that defective or abnormal wear and tear?  If not, more importantly if LC does not, it is not covered in their warranty.  Worth a shot, I suppose.  Looks totally functional to me unless I was using it to heat up nitric acid (which dissolves iron but not ceramic).  Bravo that you're getting your money's worth.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • i dream of the day when i finally have some le creuset in my house! i dream of the day i can afford the whole line!! though i do love my lodge dutch oven. 
  • VI - do you consider that defective or abnormal wear and tear?  If not, more importantly if LC does not, it is not covered in their warranty.  Worth a shot, I suppose.  Looks totally functional to me unless I was using it to heat up nitric acid (which dissolves iron but not ceramic).  Bravo that you're getting your money's worth.
    Nola,

    That is a difficult question.  If, indeed, that Le Creuset guarantees their ceramic covering for lifetime, I would certainly ask for a replacement.  However, if not, I would be perfectly happy to continue using it.  I think it is a bit harder to clean now, but not to the extent that I want to throw it out.

    I will say that if they decide to replace it, I will be a far better salesman for their products than if they decline.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,017
    They're going to follow some established corporate guideline.  Let us know if you try and what happens, and we'll be better informed to formulate a purchasing decision.  That warranty boilerplate is pretty standard everywhere.  If they man-up to the spirit of their life-time warranty, they're truly a good company.

    I would think they command great prices because of name and reputation, in that order, which is the root source of the demand that commands the high prices of their CI products. If I were a betting man, I'd put my money on replacement.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SkinnyVSkinnyV Posts: 1,544
    edited October 2012
    I have the round 7.25, do my no knead bread, and some other cooks in it. be warned its a beast and commands space for storing.
    Seattle, WA
  • Mighty_QuinnMighty_Quinn Posts: 1,878
    edited October 2012
    Well, I tried to copy and paste their warranty info here, but the paragraph formatting with the iPad is still screwed up for me....here's the link http://cookware.lecreuset.com/cookware/care_10151_-1_20002
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