Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Full Ribeye Primal or Sub Primal roast questions

CigarManCigarMan Posts: 27
edited September 2012 in Beef
I'm having a group of guys over for a get together in a week or so for a house cleaning party on Oct. 6th. By that, I have too much beer and too many cigars, and I needed a reason to have a party, lol. 

To clarify the title, I'm looking to do a full ribeye primal or sub primal on the egg. Don't know if it will be bone in, or boneless, depends on what the butcher has. I've seen plenty of full tenderloin roast recipes/instructions, but not much on Ribeye's as most search results yield prime rib. Should be 8-12 people, so it's going to be a pretty big cut of beef. Goal is prime grade, but may end up with choice. Any advice on a cook like this would be greatly appreciated. Thinking of putting my rub on, searing around 700 or so on all sides, then bringing it down and finishing indirect. Also thought about doing indirect low and slow with a little wood, then searing at the end. Please chime in if you've done this before.


Comments

  • I have done a number of theses. I have experimented many ways. For me, the best method has been indirect low and slow and then a sear at the end. As for the sear, it is easy to "over sear the fat side and have it pull back from the roast and lose some of your crust / rub (I have decided that an herb crust is what I like best on these, see pic below where this happened slightly). I have also "seared" it using the broiler in the oven and a rib rack with success. Same problem so be careful, but a broiler was easy to control. Before you sear the roast it looks rather anemic, so the searing is more for color and a little flavor. 

    Also, I let it rest at least 20 min. from roasting to searing and then at least another 20 min from searing to serving / carving. When I let it rest (both rests), I loosely tent the roast in foil, not tightly wrap it.  I am in Florida so we usually have warm weather in the summer, and I let it rest outside, however, int he winter when temps are low, I will do each rest in a cooler to hold temps. You will find that the internal temp will actually increase a little during each rest. When I do not let it rest I have definite difference.  It is my belief that both resting periods are important. If I have the time, I will extend each resting period to 30 min.

    Again, for me, this method has given the most flavor and gives me a really juicy roast with consistent edge to edge consistency of color (temperature).

    My way is definitely not the only, just works best for me :).
  • Here is another one I did. The pic is not as clear, but you can see the sear got away from me for just a bit and as a result,  the fat side on the top def pulled away a bit.  But, more importantly, you can see how evenly done from edge to edge this is. No thick well done crust or no over done parts.
  • Thanks Magic! The first post you made looks like almost like traditional whole NY strip? The bottom one looks like what is commonly referred to as "prime rib".  I've seen whole tenderloins, whole NY Strips, what I'm looking to cook is a whole ribeye, but not prime rib. Does that make sense? Is this possible?  

    What is the proper cut that I'm looking for if I'm wanting to get a big hunk of meat of this:


    That I can then cook all at once, and cut up and have a bunch of ribeye steaks to serve everyone?

    Ugh, this has been a process, lol. 
  • Just ask for a whole rib primal or a rib roast. You can get a to breast none in or out. Costco and SAMs usually have these in stock.

    Prime rib is a just a roasted rib roast so don't get too caught up in the name. It's all ribeye. Officially, it's the 3-4 ribs on one side of the primal that is considered more tender than the other. It's just a way to jack up the price when needed.

    If you are doing steaks, you don't want to cook it whole. If you cook it as a roast, slice it thin and serve that way. If you roast it then cut as steaks they are going to be charred on the edges and pink on the top and bottom. That is just weird :)

    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 19,626
    if you sear a big prime rib direct at high temps the fat pours out creating a sooty smoke that isnt too good. your better off roasting it at 450 for 20 or so minutes then dropping your temps down to 325/350 .  if i want to sear a big fatty cut i do it in a big cast iron pan, not direct. steaks sear quickly so it doesnt seem to be a problem, slower with a roast and soot and flareups are more of a problem
  • Without sounding like a broken record here, do it at 250* You will get a great result and the colour will look like rare. This was done to 150* internal to prove a point.

    DSC_0008-2

    If you cook to 115 or lower you could still rest, slice and sear but I doubt you will want to

     

  • The top one was a NY Strip and I could not figure out how to edit it, The second one was a whole Ribeye Roast. It was Prime grade. I have done a lot of whole Roasts the same way they have all been good. I have also done, as someone described above to start the temp at 450 for 15 - 20 min and then drop the temp to 325 for the remainder of the duration. While i think these come out good, they do not seem as juicy and the are not done as evenly. Low and slow, then sear for color has had the best result for me on these type of roasts.
  • What works best for me is bone on. Don't let the butcher cut the ribs off and tie them back on, it's just not the same and make sure the fat cap is left on. I like to cook it direct low and slow about 250 to 275. A four bone small end should take about 2.5 to 3 hrs. Small end is the prefered end. Rub with fresh ground black pepper, granulated garlic and Lawrys.  Here's the hot tip, cook it ribs up, fat cap down and do not turn. I've found cooking it this way the fat cap protects meat and the ribs will be some of the best beef ribs you've ever tried. I know that every cookbook will say to cook it ribs down fat cap up. I like to pull it at 135 which gives you a nice medium rare in the center and more well done on the outer cuts for those who prefer a little more done. Serve it with a nice horseradish sauce which is just sour cream and add horseradish to your liking. I thought I had some pics but I guess I'll have to cook another one!     

    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 20,125
    Bone on - definitely if you have the choice.  Lots of flavor in bone - you can taste the difference. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • CigarManCigarMan Posts: 27
    edited September 2012
    Thanks everyone for the tips. Ready to go! Final few questions for 11 people, how many pounds should I get if I do bone in? If I do a boneless, how many pounds? Any benefits of one over the other?

    From the sounds of it, I'm going to do it at about 250 or so until 120 internal, pull it, foil it, then slice it up!


  • CigarMan said:
    Thanks everyone for the tips. Ready to go! Final few questions for 11 people, how many pounds should I get if I do bone in? If I do a boneless, how many pounds? Any benefits of one over the other?

    From the sounds of it, I'm going to do it at about 250 or so until 120 internal, pull it, foil it, then slice it up!


    agreed with NOLA. Bone is is the way to go if possible (more flavor and you get some awesome beef ribs to go with your meal). I would get a 3 or 4 bone roast if you do bone in. I would get 4-5lbs if you do boneless


    Keeping it Weird in the ATX
  • billyraybillyray Posts: 1,140

    Here's a great mild horseradish sauce.


    Mustard Horseradish Sauce:


    • 1 1/2 cups good mayonnaise
    • 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
    • 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
    • 1/3 cup sour cream
    • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt


    Whisk together the mayonnaise, mustards, horseradish, sour cream, and salt in a small bowl.

    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small and waiting on a mini
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 20,125
    edited September 2012
    My go-to horseradish sauce is:

    sour cream (I use light so I can eat more)
    horseradish to taste (use prepared if you don't have straight horseradish)
    salt
    pepper
    garlic (optional - powder or roasted or tiny bit of fresh)
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Just to confirm, a 4 bone roast will be good for 11 people? Just want to be sure I have enough, as it stands now it'll be 9 steak loving guys and 2 pregnant girls, lol! I read somewhere else to buy 16-18oz's per person if doing a bone in. If that's the case, then I'm looking at an 11-13lb bone in roast. At that size, am I asking for the "small" or "big" end, or once I get this big is it all one piece?

    Finally, what kind of cook time can I expect if doing it at 250-275? 25 min per lb is about a 4hr cook time give or take.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 20,125
    That sounds about right on the weight and estimated cook times.  Better to not run out when company is over, and you gotta keep in mind that a bone-in standing rib roast will have around 40% waste (excess fat, bone).  We served 18 oz large prime ribs and 14 oz small.  We compensated for the bone, less if there wasn't a bone, more if there was. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,169

    I believe there are only seven bones in a rib roast that costitutes prime rim. I think it's the sixth through the thirteenth vertabrea. If you have a roast, bone in or out, your cook time wouldn't be 25 minutes per pound. It would be way shorter. Think about the length vs the thickness.

    I always go 1/2 lb per person pre-cooked and more if there are bones. Better to have delicious leftovers than be short.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 20,125
    Yep, 7 bones in the full primal.  6 - 12

    If it finishes early, you can hold it for hours in an oven on it's lowest setting. (150-170).  We'd roast them early in the morning and put them in warming ovens (restaurant I cooked at when in HS/college - Pelican's Wharf).
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Great info nolaegg and Steven. I think I'm going to do the full primal as just described, go indirect with the plate setter legs up at around 250. If it won't take 25-30 min per lb, then cooking once I get home from my event should work out fine. I'm planning on leaving it uncovered in the fridge for about 48hrs before the cook the cook with the rub on it so I can get a nice crust. Thoughts on that? As far as placement, do you recommend directly on the grate or on a rack?

    Thanks again for all your help!!
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,169
    Eggs have a natural hot spot at the back so I would place with the thickest bit to the back. I usually do roast beef with just salt and pepper so can't help with the rub. Make sure you use a drip pan cause you don't want to lose the drippings. I'll give you a Yorkshire Pudding recipe if you really want to blow them away.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 20,125
    I agree with little steven - I just do salt and pepper.  I'm sure it would be good with a rub, but I don't know how the au jus would turn out...not traditional.  Yeah, indirect on a rack or grate with a drip pan.  You can fashion one out of HD Aluminum foil or use a cookie sheet if it's a large piece of meat.

    And yorkshire pudding is a perfect side for the roast.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Sounds good. Definitely planning on a drip pan below! Is pulling it out of the fridge about 3 hrs prior to cooking enough time?
  • Please post that recipe as well! Actually haven't committed to a side dish yet!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 20,125
    You can pull it out the second before throwing it on.  Steaks benefit from warming up before cooking.  Roasts are cooked so long and slow they heat up pretty evenly.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,169

    http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-yorkshire-pudding

    These proportions are about right. My wife makes the batter in the Kitchenaid. I use the beef fat instead of oil in a cast iron dutch oven in the egg at 450*

     

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Looks easy enough. Can I double that recipe and put it in a turkey roasting pan? Given I have 11 people and the recipe in that video said it was 4-6 people (it looke awfully big for 4-6 people! Lol), I just want to be sure it can be doubled without a problem. Good to know the roast can go fridge to egg without bringing to room temp.
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,169
    Yes you can double or treble. I find the cast iron is best but have done it many times in stainless. You still want mashed potatoes and demi glace or gravy.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • CigarMan, have the butcher cut the meat away from the bone and then re-tie back to the bone.  This way you get the flavor from the bone while roasting, but easier to cut and serve.  S&P only seasoning needed.  

    If you put the roast directly on the grate, then use two drip pans with air space between the two for capturing the drippings.  The air layer between the two pans prevents the solids that drip down into the fat from burning.  

    Decant the the fat from the solids, use the solids as the basis for gravy and the fat for yorkshire pudding or popovers. 

    Large, small and mini SW Austin
  • I don't follow on the 2 drip pans with space? The roast goes directly on grate, with a drip pan below the grate, but raised off the plate setter. Where does a second drip pan come into play?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 20,125
    They're stacked. It's a way to keep the drippings from burning.  You create an air space that acts like an insulator - it's an alternative to keeping water in a single drip pan. Really more useful if you're baking/roasting well above the boiling point of water. 
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • ccpoulin1ccpoulin1 Posts: 390
    Always bone in, the dog loves it! It is his greatest pleasure in life, and the least I can do to reward him!

    "You are who you are when nobody is looking"

Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.