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roast beef for cold cuts

BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
edited September 2012 in EggHead Forum
I picked up some bottom rounds and was thinking of cold cuts. The egg has been giving better than deli grade lunch meats with pastrami, ham, and turkey (all smoked of course) 

  Any ideas or should I just go with a Montreal seasoning on the outside? I did a beef tenderloin for the mother in laws B  day dinner, and couldn't help but think of how great that would have been for sammies. I used Penzeys Spices, English Prime Rib Rub on that, but we ate all  6.5lbs. (what hogs)

Thanks as always folks.
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Comments

  • I have a eye of round roast on the egg right now. English prime rib rub, s & p, and some fresh chopped garlic and Rosemary. Looking forward to lunch this week.
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  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
    @70chevelle  ; Sounds good. I like the idea of fresh herbs. What temp are you roasting? and did sear first?
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  • Love Penzey's, Chicago Steak is fantastic, I have to use mail order, worth it. Never used their English Prime Rib, must try it. 

    Montreal Steak is great on eye of round for deli style meats. I find it a little too salty sometimes, but generally very good. 

    Check the rub used in this Italian beef, it is great to use for sammies, has a little zip to it. Obviously you don't need to go the whole Italian beef route, just use the rub, easy and tasty.

    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
    @Skiddymarker  ; Thanks, I will try this. It sounds delish to me.
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  • I did sear first, got the egg up to 600, seared and then dropped it to around 400 to roast. Took less than an hour to get to 125* internal.
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,741
    if im going for a hot roast beef sandwich i go with higher roasting temps, for cold deli beef sandwiches i roast direct but below 3oo dome raised direct. i like a medium rare all the way thru. i did a marinated pork loin for sandwiches this week, love deli meat off the egg
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  • @brownie, didn't have a phot of a round with Montreal Steak on it, here is photo of the last Italian beef we did. Not really a cold sammie because you heat the broth and dip the meat in it to warm and then put the whole dripping mess a roll. Top it with giardiniera and you have a real finger and drop cloth required meal. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022

    =P~   =D>   Nice!
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  • What are some examples of what you guys are cooking up for lunch meat?  I'm very interested
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 13,483
    I've done that before skiddymarker....delicious!
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • wkndcookerwkndcooker Posts: 10
    edited September 2012
    Me too. Not only the cut of meat, but how you cook it... Direct vs indirect... Temps etc. we're new at this so we're still learning. 70chevelle did you do your Eye of Round Direct heat?
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  • I like bottom round as well.  Favorite rub, indirect about 375 or so dome with your favorite smoke, raised, pull at 125.  In the fridge overnight to chill.  Next day I run it through the electric slicer very thin.  Good for sandwiches/cold cuts; low fat; inexpensive and plenty to freeze for another time.  The only way to mess it up is go too long and low and dry it out.
    My actuary says I'm dead.
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  • Sounds yummy. Baysidebob .... What do you mean by "raised" ?
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  • I use an adjustable rig to raise the meat.  It's not necessary but a fun toy. If you're using the stock grate 400ish is a good dome temp.  PS if you don't have an electric slicer: Next day pull it out of the fridge, Uncover it, put it on a piece of waxed paper or whatever and place it in the freezer for 2-4 hours. Just starting to freeze beef slices well with any straight, sharp knife.  Thin slices are the key to an otherwise "tough" cut that is easy to bite through without tearing up the sandwich bun.
    My actuary says I'm dead.
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,741
    roast beef you get in a deli is done at high low and slow temps, texture is different from a roast done in the upper 300 to 400 degree range. this was done at around 275, not dry at all and tasted like a deli beef, hotter temps give whats called pit beef, still great but different
    image
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,741
    theres also cheap ham after easter

    image
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,741
    cheap corned beef after st pats day for pastrami

    image
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  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
    edited September 2012
    @jjmills ; I like to do turkey, imagepastrami, and Low sodium hams. I just cook then to a recipe, rest them in the fridge till cold or over night and run them though my electric slicer. I food saver what I won't be eating in 1lb packs and put the excess in the freezer. (fresh meat doesn't have the preserves of deli).

    @fishlessman ; looks great. thanks for your ideas.
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  • Looks great Fishless.  Lots of ways to get there.  We will never be bored.
    My actuary says I'm dead.
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,768
    I need to get me a slicer so I can start doing my own lunch meat. Jealous of you guys and the sammiches you must be eating.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,741
    heres some marinated pork loin from the weekend run thru the slicer

    image
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  • Me too. Not only the cut of meat, but how you cook it... Direct vs indirect... Temps etc. we're new at this so we're still learning. 70chevelle did you do your Eye of Round Direct heat?

    I did my roast indirect at 400*. 

     

    A slicer may be in my future. (recommendations?)  The pics posted are excellent.  Looking forward to a roast beef sandwich on homemade bread for lunch today.  May even add a few smoked jalapenos I made yesterday after the roast was done. 

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  • There are lots of slicers out there, with a huge price range. The big thing is being able to clean it after it has performed its slicing magic. My experience is the less expensive models usually have all kinds of little nooks and crannies, catch and hold meat chunks that are almost impossible to get out. We have had ours for 10 years and the blade still sails through just about anything, so to me, being able to sharpen the blade has not been a big deal. Good luck!
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • Skiddy - what slicer do you have?  I've been thinking about one for a few years, but can't seem to pull the trigger.  I injured my right (carving) arm this summer and will be rehabbing for the rest of the year.  I may be able to rationalize a slicer due to my situation and don't mind spending the money on a good one, just don't want to spend it unnecessarily. 
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  • Does a great job on hams and beef for sammies. Ours is Chef's Choice, Pro model (sorry can't read the number because it has worn away). Wife thinks it was almost $300 10 years ago. We bought it at a restaurant/Kitchen supply place that is now gone. Sorry not much help to you. 

    My daughter bought a Rival (<$100) at Costco and it is now collecting dust and growing mould in the garage. Terrible lack of power and cleaning is almost impossible. I have a friend who just bought a good slicer, he is out of the country for a week or two, when he comes back I'll ask him what he bought. 

    @70chevelle, is that your ride? I have a '77 C10 short box, just getting to the inside of the cab on the restoration now. 
    Take care.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • BrownieBrownie Posts: 1,022
    I have a Chef's Choice 609... I purchased the smooth blade for it at an extra cost.

    I bought it based on reviews, and although it isn't a professional quality slicer, I think it does a good job and is easy to clean. The first time I used it I ran a (precooked weights) 10.5lb ham, a 6.5 pastrami, and 6lb turkey breast, and cleaned it after each meat in under an hour and a half. 

    I was pleased because my arm would have fallen off if I did it by hand, and my thinnest hand cuts would be double what the slicer.

    But, had I known how good cold cuts were from the egg I bet I would have spent at least double the price for a better grade slicer.
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 13,483
    I bought a Chef's Choice 615.  Really like it.  Easy to clean.  Perfect for what I do - jerky, sammich meat.  If you want to slice deli see-through thin, you'll need to spend 4-7 thousand on a Hobart.  Or maybe $1500 or so on a craigslist commercial slicer. 

    http://www.amazon.com/Chefs-Choice-Premium-Electric-Slicer/dp/B0058VCYWS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1348532903&amp;sr=8-1&amp;keywords=chef's+choice+615
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • If you want to slice deli see-through thin, you'll need to spend 4-7 thousand on a Hobart.  Or maybe $1500 or so on a craigslist commercial slicer. 
    I have a relatively cheap slicer.  When it burns up I'll get a better one.  This afternoon I sliced a raw serloin very, very thin and could have gone thinner.  I put the meat uncovered in the freezer and sliced it when the center was 29 degrees F.  Just right and it wasn't rock-solid frozen, just very firm.  That's also about the temp I grind beef at and it comes out fluffy.
    My actuary says I'm dead.
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  • @Brownie, Thanks - will check it out when this super exciting like watching paint dry Green Bay at Seattle hits the half. Much appreciated.
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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