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Fire Brick or New Table Nest? Please Help.

hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194
edited May 2012 in EggHead Forum
Building a brick nest for my Lg.  Granite will be on top of brick, and we started to put the fire brick on the bottom.  I saw another pic earlier today with the low profile nest.  I am now thinking granite on the bottom with the low profile nest?  Thoughtsimage

GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

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Comments

  • RandallBRandallB Posts: 67

    I really like pictures I see where a wide slab of granite is under the egg.   Looks attractive and very functional for cleaning up ash.  (flat, smooth, wide surface) 

    I have a wooden bottom shelf table with a smaller garden brick piece under egg.   It stays messy from cleanout with ash and small burns on the brick ledge and the wooden shelf ledge from sparks popping out. 

     

     

  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194

    Another thread today titled "Yet another new table -- with table nest" has a great pic of new table nest sitting on granite.  I think it looks better than my above pic.

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194

    Of course, all of my measurements were taken using the fire brick as the base.  2" table nest and 1.25" granite may still work.

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • springer01springer01 Posts: 4
    I think the granite would look best!  
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,261
    I think you are headed to a nice looking setup - with either choice.   Personally - I think the fire brick is a nice contrast.
    Cookin in Texas
  • twlangantwlangan Posts: 285
    I don't mean to lead this thread astray, but I am curious what you used to cut those fire bricks into wedge shaped pieces so cleanly?
  • Papi_MarkPapi_Mark Posts: 1

    I just about choked when the granite guy gave me a quote of over $200 for 2 pieces of granite for my table.  18x18 and 18 x 25 inches. 

    I went to Home Depot and got 3 18" travertine tiles and used a tube of hi temp rated adhesive to attach them to 1/4" Hardi Backer board.  This turned out to be the exact thickness of the 3/4" redwood I used for the table top.  Perfect insets for less than $45.

    Travertine + Hardi board might be an option for you too.  You are obviously good with a masonry or tile saw.

  • I think either would look fine, but agree that the granite slab would look "cleaner" as well as clean up easier.  Ash will fall into the fire brick cracks, which may or may not bother you.  Another consideration is that there will probably be less wobble to the Egg on a smooth piece of granite and the table nest.  Although I did notice that the Egg sways back a bit in the table nest when the lid is opened.  Will your top surface have a round opening for the Egg?  If so, then the slight swaying of the Egg will be impeded by the table top.  Good luck!
  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194
    I think either would look fine, but agree that the granite slab would look "cleaner" as well as clean up easier.  Ash will fall into the fire brick cracks, which may or may not bother you.  Another consideration is that there will probably be less wobble to the Egg on a smooth piece of granite and the table nest.  Although I did notice that the Egg sways back a bit in the table nest when the lid is opened.  Will your top surface have a round opening for the Egg?  If so, then the slight swaying of the Egg will be impeded by the table top.  Good luck!

    It will have a rounded piece of granite in the back, but will be completely open in front.  I went to my local dealer today who said he would order a table nest, but gave me a bunch of extra feet.  He thought the egg - feet - granite would be  fine.

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194
    I don't mean to lead this thread astray, but I am curious what you used to cut those fire bricks into wedge shaped pieces so cleanly?

    Brick guys have all the knowledge and tools.  I just show up and critique.  So far, they have been amazing with interior and exterior brick.

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,261
    If you do decide on granite - check around and find an installer.   Talk to them about left over, scraps.   I bought some for an outdoor area - very cheap.
    Cookin in Texas
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    you don't need firebrick, FWIW.  firebrick is rated for direct radiant exposure ti much higher temps than the bottom of the egg will see.  you could simply use the same brick you built the rest of the mass from.

    granite might look nice too, and be easier to clean (although i don't mind ash on the brick or in the joints, i have a brick patio).  but in either case, you may want the nest anyway. the egg could (might) rock a bit if it is sitting directly on different bricks.  the feet of the nest would avoid that.

    and there HAS been some cracking of stones when the egg was sitting directly on the stone itself.  that doesn't mean it's crazy high heat, and requires firebrick, just that some stone is vulnerable (might be a thickness or specie issue too, dunno)

    air (as from a nest or feet) will always be your simplest first line of insulation insurance, with stone or brick under that

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • GA_DawgsGA_Dawgs Posts: 271

    I like the fire brick.  As others have said it provides a nice contrast and I like the look and feel it will give to your outdoor kitchen/BBQ pit.  Either way, it looks great, good luck!

  • springer01springer01 Posts: 4
    you don't need firebrick, FWIW.  firebrick is rated for direct radiant exposure ti much higher temps than the bottom of the egg will see.  you could simply use the same brick you built the rest of the mass from.

    granite might look nice too, and be easier to clean (although i don't mind ash on the brick or in the joints, i have a brick patio).  but in either case, you may want the nest anyway. the egg could (might) rock a bit if it is sitting directly on different bricks.  the feet of the nest would avoid that.

    and there HAS been some cracking of stones when the egg was sitting directly on the stone itself.  that doesn't mean it's crazy high heat, and requires firebrick, just that some stone is vulnerable (might be a thickness or specie issue too, dunno)

    air (as from a nest or feet) will always be your simplest first line of insulation insurance, with stone or brick under that

    Agree I don't think you would need firebrick either.  I mean I use a paver stone under mine and it works fine.  As far as getting granite find a local installer and see if they have any scraps.  I just had a granite countertop installed and they cut the stove and sink here at my house.  They left me both pieces because I asked for them, I am sure many people don't ask even though they pay for them.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    edited May 2012
    firebrick isn't really a 'finish' brick.  most times we couldn't dirty it fast enough for the client, often building a fire as soon as possible in order to darken it and only using it at the back.  the buttery yellow refractory ceramic color is a little overkill.  lot of older chimneys (many around here that are a few hundred years old, one house i lived in had 400 year old chimneys) used 'klinkers', the hardest brick, from the center of the kiln.  once in a while one would crack or spall, but the chimneys were solid and it caused no structural or fire issues.

    personally, purely aesthetically, i think firebrick is not very attractive.  if you want accent, consider a more sympathetic material like stone.  i'd try the same brick you have already, on edge.  maybe even a herringbone or other (basketweave) pattern inset in the middle. they're going to be cutting brick anyway
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194
    Really appreciate all the feedback!

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194
    Well, I went with the granite.  Don't move into the new house for another 3 weeks.image

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,747
    Looks good. IMHO the granite makes it look finished.
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • LowflyerLowflyer Posts: 675
    Looks great. Good call on the granite.
  • STANGOJESTANGOJE Posts: 44
    Any BGE would be happy with a home like that, I can't let my egg see that setup or it may pack its bags and move on... Well Done!
  • EggbertsdadEggbertsdad Posts: 748
    Nice job! That looks great!
    Sarasota, FL via Boynton Beach, FL, via Sarasota, FL, via Charleston, SC, via The Outer Banks, via God's Country (East TN on Ft. Loudon Lake)
  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194
    Any BGE would be happy with a home like that, I can't let my egg see that setup or it may pack its bags and move on... Well Done!
    I did wait about 4 years before, but it has definately earned it's keep.

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • probe1957probe1957 Posts: 206
    I am impressed.  You are clearly far more skilled than I am.
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,261

    Granite looks very nice.

     

    Cookin in Texas
  • hartofatigerhartofatiger Posts: 194
    I am impressed.  You are clearly far more skilled than I am.
    It's all in the checkbook!

    GEAUX TIGERS!!!!!!!!!

  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 508
    That's a pretty awesome looking set up.  Minus the LSU reference.  Smoke up some Honey Badger this weekend.

    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12
    Tampa Bay, FL
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